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RealD 3D
RealD
RealD
3D is a digital stereoscopic projection technology made and sold by RealD
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Epipolar Geometry
Epipolar geometry
Epipolar geometry
is the geometry of stereo vision. When two cameras view a 3D scene from two distinct positions, there are a number of geometric relations between the 3D points and their projections onto the 2D images that lead to constraints between the image points. These relations are derived based on the assumption that the cameras can be approximated by the pinhole camera model.Contents1 Epipolar geometry1.1 Epipole or epipolar point 1.2 Epipolar line 1.3 Epipolar plane 1.4 Epipolar constraint and triangulation 1.5 Simplified cases 1.6 Epipolar geometry
Epipolar geometry
of pushbroom sensor2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingEpipolar geometry[edit] The figure below depicts two pinhole cameras looking at point X. In real cameras, the image plane is actually behind the focal center, and produces an image that is the symmetry about the focal center of the lens
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Liquid Crystal On Silicon
Liquid crystal
Liquid crystal
on silicon (LCoS or LCOS) is a miniaturized reflective active-matrix liquid-crystal display or "microdisplay" using a liquid crystal layer on top of a silicon backplane. It is also referred to as a spatial light modulator. LCoS was initially developed for projection televisions but is now used for wavelength selective switching, structured illumination, near-eye displays and optical pulse shaping. By way of comparison, some LCD
LCD
projectors use transmissive LCD, allowing light to pass through the liquid crystal. In a LCoS display, a CMOS chip controls the voltage on square reflective aluminium electrodes buried just below the chip surface, each controlling one pixel. For example, a chip with XGA resolution will have 1024x768 plates, each with an independently addressable voltage
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Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California
Los Angeles, California
since 1881
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4DX
4DX
4DX
is a motion picture technology owned and developed by South Korean company CJ 4DPLEX, a part of the CJ Group. 4DX
4DX
allows a motion picture presentation to be augmented with environmental effects such as seat motion, wind, rain, fog, lights, and scents along with the standard video and audio. As such, theaters must be specially designed for and equipped with 4DX
4DX
technology
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Lenny Lipton
Leonard (Lenny) Lipton (born May 18, 1940, Brooklyn, New York) is an author, filmmaker and inventor. At age 19, Lipton wrote the poem that became the basis for the lyrics to the song "Puff the Magic Dragon". He went on to write books on independent filmmaking and become a pioneer in the field of projected three-dimensional imagery. His technology is used to show 3D films on more than 25,000 theater screens worldwide.Contents1 Education 2 Career2.1 Puff the Magic Dragon 2.2 Independent films 2.3 Stereography3 Books 4 References 5 External linksEducation[edit] Lipton majored in physics at Cornell University after starting out in electrical engineering. A self-described "mediocre student", he only excelled once he found a field he loved
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Panavision 3D
Panavision is an American motion picture equipment company specializing in cameras and lenses, based in Woodland Hills, California. Formed by Robert Gottschalk as a small partnership to create anamorphic projection lenses during the widescreen boom in the 1950s, Panavision expanded its product lines to meet the demands of modern filmmakers. The company introduced its first products in 1954. Originally a provider of CinemaScope accessories, the company's line of anamorphic widescreen lenses soon became the industry leader. In 1972, Panavision helped revolutionize filmmaking with the lightweight Panaflex 35 mm movie camera
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IMAX
IMAX
IMAX
is a 70 mm motion picture film format that displays images of greater size and resolution than conventional film systems. Graeme Ferguson, Roman Kroitor, Robert Kerr, and William C. Shaw developed the IMAX
IMAX
cinema projection standards in the late 1960s and early 1970s in Canada.[1] Unlike conventional projectors, the film runs horizontally (see diagram sprocket holes) so that the image width is greater than the width of the film. Since 2002, some feature films have been converted into IMAX
IMAX
format for displaying in IMAX
IMAX
theatres, and some have also been partially shot in IMAX. IMAX
IMAX
is the most widely used system for special-venue film presentations
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List Of 3D Films
This is an incomplete list of 3D films from 2005 onwards. The tables can be sorted by clicking the arrow icons in the column headers.Contents1 Feature films 2 Short films 3 See also 4 External links 5 ReferencesFeature films[edit]This list needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Note: films listed as "Filmed in 2D" or "Rendered in 2D" in the Camera System column were converted to 3D during post-production.Title Release Date Prod
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Silver Screen
A silver screen, also known as a silver lenticular screen, is a type of projection screen that was popular in the early years of the motion picture industry and passed into popular usage as a metonym for the cinema industry
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Liquid Crystal
Liquid
Liquid
crystals (LCs) are matter in a state which has properties between those of conventional liquids and those of solid crystals.[1] For instance, a liquid crystal may flow like a liquid, but its molecules may be oriented in a crystal-like way. There are many different types of liquid-crystal phases, which can be distinguished by their different optical properties (such as birefringence). When viewed under a microscope using a polarized light source, different liquid crystal phases will appear to have distinct textures. The contrasting areas in the textures correspond to domains where the liquid-crystal molecules are oriented in different directions. Within a domain, however, the molecules are well ordered. LC materials may not always be in a liquid-crystal phase (just as water may turn into ice or steam). Liquid
Liquid
crystals can be divided into thermotropic, lyotropic and metallotropic phases
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Electro-optics
Electro-optics is a branch of electrical engineering, electronic engineering, materials science, and material physics involving components, devices (e.g. Lasers, LEDs, waveguides etc.) and systems which operate by the propagation and interaction of light with various tailored materials. It is essentially the same as what is popularly described today as photonics. It is not only concerned with the "Electro-Optic effect". Thus it concerns the interaction between the electromagnetic (optical) and the electrical (electronic) states of materials. Electro-optical devices[edit] The electro-optic effect relates to a change in the optical properties of the medium, which is usually a change in the birefringence, and not simply the refractive index. In a Kerr cell, the change in birefringence is proportional to the square of the electric field, and the material is usually a liquid
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Motion Blur
Motion blur
Motion blur
is the apparent streaking of rapidly moving objects in a still image or a sequence of images such as a movie or animation. It results when the image being recorded changes during the recording of a single exposure, either due to rapid movement or long exposure.Contents1 Applications of motion blur1.1 Photography 1.2 Animation 1.3 Computer graphics 1.4 Biology2 Negative effects of motion blur 3 Restoration 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 ReferencesApplications of motion blur[edit] Photography[edit]An example of motion blur showing a London
London
bus passing a telephone box in London1920s example of motion blurWhen a camera creates an image, that image does not represent a single instant of time
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Sony
Sony
Sony
Corporation (ソニー株式会社, Sonī Kabushiki Kaisha, /ˈsoʊni/ SOH-nee, stylized as SONY) is a Japanese multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Kōnan, Minato, Tokyo.[9][1] Its diversified business includes consumer and professional electronics, gaming, entertainment and financial services.[10] The company is one of the leading manufacturers of electronic products for the consumer and professional markets.[11]
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Digital Cinema
Digital cinema
Digital cinema
refers to the use of digital technology to distribute or project motion pictures as opposed to the historical use of reels of motion picture film, such as 35 mm film. Whereas film reels have to be shipped to movie theaters, a digital movie can be distributed to cinemas in a number of ways: over the Internet
Internet
or dedicated satellite links, or by sending hard drives or optical discs such as Blu-ray
Blu-ray
discs. Digital movies are projected using a digital video projector instead of a film projector. Digital cinema
Digital cinema
is distinct from high-definition television and does not necessarily use traditional television or other traditional high-definition video standards, aspect ratios, or frame rates
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Circular Polarization
In electrodynamics, circular polarization of an electromagnetic wave is a polarization state in which, at each point, the electric field of the wave has a constant magnitude but its direction rotates with time at a steady rate in a plane perpendicular to the direction of the wave. In electrodynamics the strength and direction of an electric field is defined by its electric field vector. In the case of a circularly polarized wave, as seen in the accompanying animation, the tip of the electric field vector, at a given point in space, describes a circle as time progresses. At any instant of time, the electric field vector of the wave describes a helix along the direction of propagation
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