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Ray Winstone
Raymond Andrew "Ray" Winstone (/ˈwɪnstən/;[1] born February 19, 1957) is an English film and television actor. He is mostly known for his "hard man" roles beginning with his role as Carlin in the 1979 film Scum. He also played Kevin, an ex-army soldier, in Quadrophenia as well as Will Scarlet in the television series Robin of Sherwood
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Glaswegian
The Glasgow
Glasgow
patter, or Glaswegian, is a Scots dialect spoken in and around Glasgow, Scotland. In addition to local West Mid Scots, the dialect has Highland English and Hiberno-English
Hiberno-English
influences,[1] owing to the speech of Highlanders and Irish people, who migrated in large numbers to the Glasgow
Glasgow
area in the 19th and early 20th centuries.[2] The Patter is used widely in everyday speech in Glasgow, and even occasionally in broadcasting and print. It is constantly evolving and being updated with new euphemisms as well as nicknames for well-known local figures and buildings.Contents1 In the media 2 Alleged influence from Cockney 3 References 4 External linksIn the media[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Edward G. Robinson
Edward G. Robinson
Edward G. Robinson
(born Emanuel Goldenberg; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American actor, born in Romania,[1] who was popular star on stage and screen during Hollywood's Golden Age. He appeared in 40 Broadway plays and more than 100 films during a 50-year career[2] and is best remembered for his tough-guy roles as a gangster, such as his star-making films, Little Caesar and Key Largo. During the 1930s and 1940s, he was an outspoken public critic of fascism and Nazism, which were first growing in strength in Europe and led up to World War II. His activism included contributing over $250,000 to more than 850 organizations involved in war relief, along with cultural, educational and religious groups
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Slot Machine
A slot machine (American English), known variously as a fruit machine (British English), puggy (Scottish English),[1] the slots (Canadian and American English), poker machine/pokies ( Australian English
Australian English
and New Zealand English), or simply slot (American English), is a casino gambling machine with three or more reels which spin when a button is pushed. Slot machines
Slot machines
are also known as one-armed bandits because they were originally operated by one lever on the side of the machine as distinct from a button on the front panel and because of their ability to leave the player impoverished or in debt and because bandit can be a synonym for "thief" in modern usage.[2] Many modern machines are still equipped with a legacy lever in addition to the button. Slot machines
Slot machines
include a currency detector that validates the money inserted to play
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Grammar School
A grammar school is one of several different types of school in the history of education in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and other English-speaking countries, originally a school teaching Latin, but more recently an academically-oriented secondary school, differentiated in recent years from less academic Secondary Modern Schools. The original purpose of medieval grammar schools was the teaching of Latin. Over time the curriculum was broadened, first to include Ancient Greek, and later English and other European languages, natural sciences, mathematics, history, geography, and other subjects. In the late Victorian era
Victorian era
grammar schools were reorganised to provide secondary education throughout England and Wales; Scotland had developed a different system
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Comprehensive School
A comprehensive school is a secondary school that is a state school and does not select its intake on the basis of academic achievement or aptitude, in contrast to the selective school system, where admission is restricted on the basis of selection criteria. The term is commonly used in relation to England and Wales, where comprehensive schools were introduced on an experimental basis in the 1940s and became more widespread from 1965. About 90% of British secondary school pupils now attend comprehensive schools
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Certificate Of Secondary Education
The Certificate of Secondary Education (CSE) was a subject specific qualification family, awarded in both academic and vocational fields in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. CSE examination were set in the years 1965 to 1987 inclusive
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Albert Finney
Albert Finney
Albert Finney
(born 9 May 1936) is an English actor. Beginning in the theatre, Finney was especially successful in plays by William Shakespeare before he switched to films. He achieved prominence in films in the early 1960s, his debut being The Entertainer, directed by Tony Richardson, who had directed him in theatre plays various times before. He became a leading Free Cinema
Free Cinema
figure, and has maintained a successful career in theatre, film and television
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Saturday Night And Sunday Morning (film)
Saturday Night and Sunday Morning
Saturday Night and Sunday Morning
is a 1960 British drama film directed by Karel Reisz
Karel Reisz
and produced by Tony Richardson. It is an adaptation of the 1958 novel of the same name by Alan Sillitoe, who also wrote the screenplay adaptation. The film is about a young machinist who spends his weekends drinking and partying, all the while having an affair with a married woman. The film is one of a series of "kitchen sink drama" films made in the late 1950s and early 1960s, as part of the British New Wave
British New Wave
of filmmaking, from directors such as Reisz, Jack Clayton, Lindsay Anderson, John Schlesinger
John Schlesinger
and Tony Richardson
Tony Richardson
and adapted from the works of writers such as Sillitoe, John Braine
John Braine
and John Osborne
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John Wayne
Marion Mitchell Morrison (born Marion Robert Morrison; May 26, 1907 – June 11, 1979), known professionally as John Wayne
John Wayne
and nicknamed Duke, was an American actor and filmmaker.[1] An Academy Award-winner for True Grit (1969), Wayne was among the top box office draws for three decades.[2][3] Born in Winterset, Iowa, Wayne grew up in Southern California. He was president of Glendale High class of 1925.[4] He found work at local film studios when he lost his football scholarship to the University of Southern California
Southern California
as a result of a bodysurfing accident.[5]:63–64 Initially working for the Fox Film Corporation, he appeared mostly in small bit parts
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James Cagney
James Francis Cagney Jr. (July 17, 1899 – March 30, 1986)[2] was an American actor and dancer, both on stage and in film,[3] though he had his greatest impact in film
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Emil And The Detectives
Emil and the Detectives (German: Emil und die Detektive) is a 1929[1] novel for children set mainly in Berlin, by the German writer Erich Kästner and illustrated by Walter Trier. It was Kästner's first major success, the only one of his pre-1945 works to escape Nazi censorship, and remains his best-known work, and has been translated into at least 59 languages. The most unusual aspect of the novel, compared to existing children's literature at the time, was that it was realistically set in a contemporary Berlin
Berlin
peopled with some fairly rough characters, not in a sanitized fantasy world; also that it refrained from obvious moralizing, letting the characters' deeds speak for themselves.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Sequel 3 Adaptations 4 References 5 External linksPlot summary[edit] The story begins in Neustadt,[2] a provincial German town which is the home to young schoolboy Emil Tischbein
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London Borough Of Enfield
40.5% White British 2.2% White Irish 0.1% White Gypsy or Irish Traveller 18.2% Other White 1.6% White & Black Caribbean 0.8% White & Black African 1.3% White & Asian 1.8% Other Mixed 3.7% Indian 0.8% Pakistani 1.8% Bangladeshi 0.8% Chinese 4% Other Asian 9% Black African 5.5% Black Caribbean 2.6% Other Black 0.6% Arab 4.5% OtherTime zone GMT (UTC) • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)Postcodes EN, N, EArea code(s) 01992, 020ONS code 00AKGSS code E09000010Police Metropolitan PoliceWebsite https://new.enfield.gov.uk/The London Borough of Enfield ( pronunciation (help·info)) is a London borough in north London with some districts within the borough straddling north-east London, England
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Boxing
Boxing
Boxing
is a combat sport in which two people, usually wearing protective gloves, throw punches at each other for a predetermined set of time in a boxing ring. Amateur boxing
Amateur boxing
is both an Olympic and Commonwealth Games
Commonwealth Games
sport and is a common fixture in most international games—it also has its own World Championships. Boxing
Boxing
is supervised by a referee over a series of one- to three-minute intervals called rounds. The result is decided when an opponent is deemed incapable to continue by a referee, is disqualified for breaking a rule, resigns by throwing in a towel, or is pronounced the winner or loser based on the judges' scorecards at the end of the contest. In the event that both fighters gain equal scores from the judges, the fight is considered a draw (professional boxing)
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Sugar Ray Robinson
Sugar Ray Robinson
Sugar Ray Robinson
(born Walker Smith Jr.; May 3, 1921 – April 12, 1989) was an American professional boxer who competed from 1940 to 1965. Widely considered the greatest pound-for-pound boxer of all time, Robinson's performances in the welterweight and middleweight divisions prompted sportswriters to create "pound for pound" rankings, where they compared fighters regardless of weight. He was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame
International Boxing Hall of Fame
in 1990.[1] In 2002, Robinson was ranked number one on The Ring magazine's list of "80 Best Fighters of the Last 80 Years".[2] Robinson was 85–0 as an amateur with 69 of those victories coming by way of knockout, 40 in the first round. He turned professional in 1940 at the age of 19 and by 1951 had a professional record of 128–1–2 with 84 knockouts
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Welterweight
Welterweight is a weight class in combat sports. Originally the term "welterweight" was used only in boxing, but other combat sports like Muay Thai, taekwondo, and mixed martial arts also use it for their own weight division system to classify the opponents
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