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Ray Suarez
BA, New York University MA, University of ChicagoOccupation Journalist, AnchorNotable credit(s) PBS NewsHour, Talk
Talk
of the Nation, American RadioWorks, Inside StorySpouse(s) Carole SuarezChildren Rafael, Eva and IsabelRafael Suarez, Jr. (born March 5, 1957), known as Ray Suarez, is an American broadcast journalist and the current John J. McCloy Visiting Professor of American Studies at Amherst College. Most recently,[when?] Suarez was the host of Inside Story on Al Jazeera America Story, a daily news program on Al Jazeera America, until that network ceased operation in 2016. Suarez joined the PBS NewsHour
PBS NewsHour
in 1999 and was a senior correspondent for the evening news program on the PBS television network until 2013. He is also host of the international news and analysis public radio program America Abroad from Public Radio International
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Twitter
Twitter
Twitter
(/ˈtwɪtər/) is a microblogging and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as "tweets". Tweets were originally restricted to 140 characters, but on November 7, 2017, this limit was doubled to 280 for all languages except Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.[14] Registered users can post, like, and retweet tweets, but unregistered users can only read them. Users access Twitter
Twitter
through its website interface, through Short Message Service
Short Message Service
(SMS) or its mobile-device application software ("app").[15] Twitter, Inc. is based in San Francisco, California, and has more than 25 offices around the world.[16] Twitter
Twitter
was created in March 2006 by Jack Dorsey, Noah Glass, Biz Stone, and Evan Williams, launched in July of that year. The service rapidly gained worldwide popularity
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UCLA
The University of California, Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(UCLA) is a public research university in the Westwood district of Los Angeles, United States
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National Capital Area Council
The National Capital Area Council
National Capital Area Council
(NCAC) is a local council of the Boy Scouts of America within the Northeast Region that serves Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, and the United States Virgin Islands.[1] The council offers extensive training, and administrative support to units.[3] It is rated as a "Class 100" council by the National Council (headquarters office), which denotes that the NCAC is among the very largest in the country. Chartered in 1911, it is also one of the oldest. The council is divided into 22 districts serving ten counties in Northern Virginia, six counties in Maryland, the District of Columbia, the US Virgin Islands, and BSA units throughout North and South America. The council has a 2.5 to 1 ratio of youth members to adult leaders, which is among the highest of all the councils. The youth retention rate approaches 80%.[4]Contents1 History 2 Organization 3 Goshen Scout Reservation 4 Camp William B
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Social Sciences
Social science
Social science
is a major category of academic disciplines, concerned with society and the relationships among individuals within a society. It in turn has many branches, each of which is considered a social science. The social sciences include, but are not limited to: anthropology, archaeology, economics, history, human geography, jurisprudence, linguistics, political science , psychology, public health, and sociology. The term is also sometimes used to refer specifically to the field of sociology, the original 'science of society', established in the 19th century. A more detailed list of sub-disciplines within the social sciences can be found at Outline of social science. Positivist
Positivist
social scientists use methods resembling those of the natural sciences as tools for understanding society, and so define science in its stricter modern sense
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States.[5] Founded after the American Revolution
American Revolution
as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, the first president of the
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Episcopal Church (United States)
Episcopal may refer to:Bishop, an overseer in the Christian church Episcopate, the see of a bishop – a diocese Episcopal Church (other), any church with "Episcopal" in its nameThe Episcopal Church, an affiliate of Anglicanism
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Latino
Latino
Latino
(/læˈtiːnoʊ, lə-/)[1] is a term often used in the United States to refer to people with cultural ties to Latin
Latin
America, in contrast to
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H1N1
Influenza
Influenza
A (H1N1) virus is the subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu) in 2009, and is associated with the 1918 outbreak known as the Spanish Flu. It is an orthomyxovirus that contains the glycoproteins haemagglutinin and neuraminidase. For this reason, they are described as H1N1, H1N2 etc. depending on the type of H or N antigens they express with metabolic synergy. Haemagglutinin
Haemagglutinin
causes red blood cells to clump together and binds the virus to the infected cell. Neuraminidase
Neuraminidase
is a type of glycoside hydrolase enzyme which helps to move the virus particles through the infected cell and assist in budding from the host cells.[1] Some strains of H1N1 are endemic in humans and cause a small fraction of all influenza-like illness and a small fraction of all seasonal influenza
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Utne Reader
Utne Reader
Utne Reader
(a.k.a. Utne)[pronunciation?] is a quarterly American magazine that collects and reprints articles on politics, culture, and the environment, generally from alternative media sources including journals, newsletters, weeklies, zines, music, and DVDs. The magazine's writers and editors contribute book, film, and music reviews and original articles which tend to focus on emerging cultural trends. The magazine's website produces ten blogs covering politics, environment, media, spirituality, science and technology, great writing, and the arts
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Rubén Salazar
Ruben Salazar
Ruben Salazar
(March 3, 1928 – August 29, 1970)[1] was a reporter for the Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times, the first Mexican-American
Mexican-American
journalist from mainstream media to cover the Chicano
Chicano
community.[2] Salazar died during the National Chicano
Chicano
Moratorium March against the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
on August 29, 1970, in East Los Angeles, California. An investigation determined that his death was accidental, after Salazar was struck by a tear-gas projectile fired by a Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County Sheriff's deputy
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National Council Of La Raza
UnidosUS, formerly National Council of La Raza
National Council of La Raza
(NCLR) (La Raza),[1] is the United States's largest Latino
Latino
nonprofit advocacy organization
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Kalamazoo College
Kalamazoo College, also known as K College or simply K, is a private liberal arts college founded in 1833 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The college campus is located immediately east of Western Michigan University. The school was founded by American Baptist ministers, but today maintains no religious affiliation. Kalamazoo College
Kalamazoo College
is a member of the Great Lakes Colleges Association. It is listed in Loren Pope's Colleges That Change Lives. In 2012, Forbes
Forbes
rated it 65th of America's Best Colleges,[2][3] the highest ranked private college in Michigan
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Brooklyn
Coordinates: 40°41′34″N 73°59′25″W / 40.69278°N 73.99028°W / 40.69278; -73.99028Brooklyn Kings CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateClockwise from top left: Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge, Brooklyn
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Muhlenberg College
Muhlenberg College
College
is a private liberal arts college located in Allentown, Pennsylvania, United States. Founded in 1848, Muhlenberg is affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
and is named for Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, the German patriarch of the Lutheran
Lutheran
Church in America.Contents1 History 2 Campus 3 Academics3.1 Programs 3.2 Admissions and rankings4 Student life 5 Athletics5.1 Football6 Notable people 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Muhlenberg College
College
was initially established in 1848 as the Allentown Seminary by Reverend Samuel K
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Westminster College, Salt Lake City
Westminster
Westminster
College is a private liberal arts college located in the Sugar House neighborhood of Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. The college comprises four schools: the School of Arts and Sciences, the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business, the School of Education, and the School of Nursing and Health Sciences
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