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Rathcroghan
Rathcroghan
Rathcroghan
(Irish: Ráth Cruachan, meaning "fort of Cruachan") is a complex of archaeological sites near Tulsk
Tulsk
in County Roscommon, Ireland. It is identified as the site of Cruachan, the traditional capital of the Connachta, a term used to describe the prehistoric and early historic rulers of the western territory. The Rathcroghan Complex (Crúachan Aí) is a unique archaeological landscape with many references found in early Irish medieval manuscripts. Located on the plains of Connacht
Connacht
(Mag nAí/Machaire Connacht), Rathcroghan
Rathcroghan
is one of the six Royal Sites of Ireland
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Irish Language
The Irish language
Irish language
(Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language,[5] is a Goidelic
Goidelic
language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland
Ireland
and historically spoken by the Irish people. Irish is spoken as a first language by a small minority of Irish people, and as a second language by a larger group of non-native speakers. Irish has been the predominant language of the Irish people
Irish people
for most of their recorded history, and they have brought it with them to other regions, notably Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man, where Middle Irish gave rise to Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
and Manx respectively
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Medb Lethderg
In Irish mythology
Irish mythology
Medb
Medb
Lethderg ([mɛðv l͈ʲeθ.ðerɡ]; "red-side") was a goddess of sovereignty associated with Tara. She was the wife or lover of nine successive kings, including Fedlimid Rechtmar, Art mac Cuinn and Cormac mac Airt. She is probably identical with or the inspiration for Medb
Medb
of the Connachta
Connachta
in the Ulster Cycle (Byrne 2001). The poem "Macc Moga Corbb celas clú" in the Book of Leinster
Book of Leinster
is ascribed to her. References[edit]Byrne, Francis John, Irish Kings and High-Kings. Four Courts Press. 2nd edition, 2001.This article relating to a Celtic myth or legend is a stub
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Fort
Fortifications are military constructions, or buildings, designed for the defense of territories in warfare and also used to solidify rule in a region during peace time. For many thousands of years, humans have constructed defensive works in a variety of increasingly complex designs. The term is derived from the Latin
Latin
fortis ("strong") and facere ("to make"). From very early history to modern times, walls have often been necessary for cities to survive in an ever-changing world of invasion and conquest. Some settlements in the Indus Valley Civilization
Indus Valley Civilization
were the first small cities to be fortified. In ancient Greece, large stone walls had been built in Mycenaean Greece, such as the ancient site of Mycenae
Mycenae
(famous for the huge stone blocks of its 'cyclopean' walls)
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Nera (mythology)
Nera (modern spelling Neara) is a warrior of Connacht
Connacht
in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. One Samhain
Samhain
night when the warriors of Cruachan were feasting, King Aillil offered a prize to any man who was brave enough to put a wicker band around the ankle of a corpse that had been hanged. Because Samhain
Samhain
was considered to be a night when the dead have power, only Nera was courageous enough to volunteer. When he placed the wicker band around the corpse's ankle, it moved and asked him for water. Nera allowed it to climb on his back and he carried it to a house, but flames sprang up around the house when they approached. They tried a second house, which was then surrounded by water. On their third attempt, they were able to enter the house, and the corpse drank three cups of water, spitting the last out on the householders and killing them
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The King Of The Cats
The King of the Cats
The King of the Cats
(or The King o' the Cats) is a folk tale from the British Isles.[1] The earliest known example is found in Beware the Cat, written by William Baldwin
William Baldwin
in 1553,[nb 1] though it is related to the first century story of "The Death of Pan". Other notable versions include one in a letter written by Thomas Lyttelton, 2nd Baron Lyttelton, first published in 1782,[nb 2] M. G
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County Sligo
County Sligo
Sligo
(/ˈslaɪɡoʊ/ SLY-goh, Irish: Contae Shligigh) is an Irish county
Irish county
and part of the province of Connacht. It is located in the Border Region. Sligo
Sligo
is the administrative capital and largest town in the county. Sligo
Sligo
County Council is the local authority for the county. The population of the county is 65,393 according to the 2011[citation needed] census making it the 3rd most populated county in the province
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Tailtiu
Tailtiu or Tailltiu (Old Irish pronunciation: [ˈtalʲtʲu]; modern spelling: Tailte) (also known as Talti) is the name of a presumed goddess from Irish mythology. The goddess's name is linked to Teltown
Teltown
(< OI Óenach Tailten) in Co. Meath, site of the Óenach Tailten. A legendary dindsenchas "lore of places" poem relates a myth connecting the presumed goddess Tailtiu with the site
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Hill Of Tara
The Hill of Tara
Hill of Tara
(Irish: Cnoc na Teamhrach,[2] Teamhair or Teamhair na Rí), located near the River Boyne, is an archaeological complex that runs between Navan
Navan
and Dunshaughlin
Dunshaughlin
in County Meath, Ireland
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Martyrology Of Oengus
Óengus mac Óengobann, better known as Saint Óengus of Tallaght
Tallaght
or Óengus the Culdee,[1] was an Irish bishop, reformer and writer, who flourished in the first quarter of the 9th century and is held to be the author of the Félire Óengusso (" Martyrology of Óengus") and possibly the Martyrology of Tallaght. Little of Óengus's life and career is reliably attested
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Eochaid Feidlech
Eochu or Eochaid Feidlech ("the enduring"),[1] son of Finn, son of Fionnlogh, son of Rogen Ruad, son of Essamain Emna, son of Blathnachta, son of Labraid Lorc, son of Enna Aignech was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland. He is best known as the father of the legendary queen Medb
Medb
of Connacht. According to the 12th century Lebor Gabála Érenn, he took power when he defeated the previous High King, Fachtna Fáthach, in the Battle of Leitir Rúaid.[2] The Middle Irish saga Cath Leitrech Ruibhe tells the story of this battle. While Fachtna Fáthach was away from Tara on a visit to Ulster, Eochu, then king of Connacht, raised an army, had the provincial kings killed and took hostages from Tara
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Ailill
Ailill (Ailell, Oilioll) a popular male given name in medieval Ireland meaning "elf". It can be pronounced either as "AWL-yil" or "Ah-EEL", dependent on spelling and may refer to: Ailill mac Máta, legendary king of Connacht and husband of queen Medb Ailill mac Slanuill, legendary High King of Ireland of the 12th century BC Ailill Finn, legendary High King of the 8th century BC Ailill Caisfhiaclach, legendary High King of the 5th century BC Ailill mac Echach Mugmedóin, half-brother of Niall of the Nine Hostages (5th century AD) Ailill Molt, High King of the 5th century AD Ailill Inbanda (died c. 549), King of Connacht Saint Ailill the First b. c.460 – d.13 January 526, Bishop of Armagh, Ireland from 513 to 13 January 526 Ailill the Second
Ailill the Second
b. c.480 - d
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Ogham
Ogham
Ogham
(/ˈɒɡəm/;[1] Modern Irish [ˈoːmˠ] or [ˈoːəmˠ]; Old Irish: ogam [ˈɔɣamˠ]) is an Early Medieval
Early Medieval
alphabet used to write the early Irish language
Irish language
(in the "orthodox" inscriptions, 1st to 6th centuries AD), and later the Old Irish language (scholastic ogham, 6th to 9th centuries). There are roughly 400 surviving orthodox inscriptions on stone monuments throughout Ireland and western Britain; the bulk of which are in southern Munster.[2] The largest number outside Ireland are in Pembrokeshire, Wales.[3] The vast majority of the inscriptions consist of personal names. According to the High Medieval Bríatharogam, names of various trees can be ascribed to individual letters. The etymology of the word ogam or ogham remains unclear
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Gabriel Beranger
Gabriel Beranger
Gabriel Beranger
(1725-1817) was a Dutch artist, known for his works showing Irish antiquities.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 External links 4 NotesLife[edit] Beranger was born in Rotterdam
Rotterdam
on 9 March 1725, as the son of Henry Beranger and Marie le Duc/Anne Marie Leduc.[1] His parents, who had married in Rotterdam
Rotterdam
in 1713, were both of Huguenot
Huguenot
origin
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Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) is a national mapping agency in the United Kingdom which covers the island of Great Britain.[1] It is one of the world's largest producers of maps. Since 1 April 2015 it has operated as Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Ltd, a government-owned company, 100% in public ownership. The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
Board remains accountable to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. It is also a member of the Public Data Group. The agency's name indicates its original military purpose (see ordnance and surveying), which was to map Scotland
Scotland
in the wake of the Jacobite rising of 1745
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Triads Of Ireland
The title Trecheng Breth Féne "A Triad of Judgments of the Irish", more widely known as "The Triads of Ireland", refers to a miscellaneous collection of about 214 Old Irish triads (and some numerical variants) on a variety of topics, such as nature, geography, law, custom and behaviour
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