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Rapier
Rapier
Rapier
(/ˈreɪpiər/) or espada ropera, is a loose term for a type of slender, sharply pointed sword. With such design features, the rapier is optimized to be a thrusting weapon, but cutting or slashing attacks were also recorded in some historical treatises like Capo Ferro's Gran Simulacro in 1610
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Dagger
A dagger is a knife with a very sharp point and two or more sharp edges, typically designed or capable of being used as a thrusting or stabbing weapon.[1][2] Daggers have been used throughout human experience for close combat confrontations,[3] and many cultures have used adorned daggers in ritual and ceremonial contexts. The distinctive shape and historic usage of the dagger have made it iconic and symbolic. A dagger in the modern sense is a weapon designed for close-proximity combat or self-defence; due to its use in historic weapon assemblages, it has associations with maleness and martiality. Double-edged knives, however, play different sorts of roles in different social contexts
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Giovanni Dall'Agocchie
Giovanni Dall’Agocchie was an Italian fencer and author who published a fencing manual titled Dell'Arte di Scrima Libri Tre ("Three Books on the Art of Defense") in 1572. External links[edit]Dell'Arte di Scrima translation by William E. WilsonThis biographical article about an Italian writer or poet is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis biographical article related to fencing in Italy is a stub
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Crossguard
On a sword, the crossguard, or cross-guard, also known as quillons,[1] is a bar of metal at right angles to the blade, placed between the blade and the hilt. The crossguard was developed in the European sword around the 10th century for the protection of the wielder's hand. The earliest forms were the crossguard variant of the Spatha
Spatha
used by the Huns, the so-called Pontic swords. The crossguards were not only used to counter enemy attacks, but also to get a better grip on the sword. They were later seen in late Viking swords, and is a standard feature of the Norman sword
Norman sword
of the 11th century and of the knightly arming sword throughout the high and late medieval period.[citation needed] Early crossguards were straight metal bars, sometimes tapering towards the outer ends. While this simple type was never discontinued, more elaborate forms developed alongside it in the course of the Middle Ages
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Charles Du Fresne, Sieur Du Cange
Charles du Fresne, sieur du Cange
Charles du Fresne, sieur du Cange
or Du Cange (French: [dy kɑ̃ʒ]; December 18, 1610 in Amiens
Amiens
– October 23, 1688 in Paris) was a distinguished philologist and historian of the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and Byzantium.Contents1 Charles du Fresne 2 Works 3 Notes 4 Further readingCharles du Fresne[edit] Educated by Jesuits, du Cange studied law and practiced for several years before assuming the office of Treasurer of France. Du Cange was a busy, energetic man who pursued historical scholarship alongside his demanding official duties and his role as head of a large family. Du Cange's most important work is his Glossarium mediae et infimae Latinitatis (Glossary of medieval and late Latin, Paris, 1678)
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Art Institute Of Chicago
The Art Institute of Chicago, founded in 1879 and located in Chicago's Grant Park, is one of the oldest and largest art museums in the United States. Recognized for its curatorial efforts and popularity among visitors, the museum hosts approximately 1.5 million guests annually.[2] Its collection, stewarded by 11 curatorial departments, is encyclopedic, and includes iconic works such as Georges Seurat's A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, Pablo Picasso's The Old Guitarist, Edward Hopper's Nighthawks, and Grant Wood's American Gothic
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Walter William Skeat
Walter William Skeat
Walter William Skeat
(21 November 1835 – 6 October 1912), FBA, was the pre-eminent British philologist of his time. He was instrumental in developing the English language as a higher education subject in the United Kingdom.Contents1 Life 2 Work2.1 Etymology, lexicography, and place-name studies 2.2 Editions 2.3 Teaching3 International relations 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Skeat was born in London and educated at King's College School (Wimbledon), Highgate School, and Christ's College, Cambridge. He became a fellow at Christ's College in July 1860.[1] In 1860, Skeat was ordained an Anglican deacon and married Bertha Clara. In December 1860, he became a curate at East Dereham, where he served during 1861 and most of 1862. From 1862 to 1863, Skeat served as the curate at Godalming, Surrey
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Gustavus Adolphus Of Sweden
Gustav II Adolf (9 December 1594 – 6 November 1632, O.S.), widely known in English by his Latinised name Gustavus Adolphus or as Gustav II Adolph,[1] was the King of Sweden
Sweden
from 1611 to 1632 who is credited for the founding of Sweden
Sweden
as a great power (Swedish: Stormaktstiden). He led Sweden
Sweden
to military supremacy during the Thirty Years' War, helping to determine the political as well as the religious balance of power in Europe. He was formally and posthumously given the name Gustavus Adolphus the Great (Swedish: Gustav Adolf den store, Latin: Gustavus Adolphus Magnus) by the Riksdag of the Estates
Riksdag of the Estates
in 1634.[2][3][4] He is often regarded as one of the greatest military commanders of all time, with innovative use of combined arms.[5] His most notable military victory was the Battle of Breitenfeld (1631)
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Self-Defense
Self-defence (self-defense in some varieties of English) is a countermeasure that involves defending the health and well-being of oneself from harm.[1] The use of the right of self-defense as a legal justification for the use of force in times of danger is available in many jurisdictions, but the interpretation varies widely.[2]Contents1 Physical1.1 Unarmed 1.2 Armed2 Mental 3 Other forms3.1 Avoidance 3.2 De-escalation 3.3 Personal alarms4 Self-defense
Self-defense
education4.1 ACS Algerien combat système 4.2 Farid Guendouze système5 Legal aspects5.1 Application of the law6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPhysical[edit] Ju-Jitsu
Ju-Jitsu
defence against a knife attack. Berlin
Berlin
1924Physical self-defense is the use of physical force to counter an immediate threat of violence. Such force can be either armed or unarmed
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Swiss Guard
Swiss Guards
Swiss Guards
(French: Gardes Suisses; German: Schweizergarde) are the Swiss soldiers who have served as guards at foreign European courts since the late 15th century. Foreign military service was outlawed by the revised Swiss Federal Constitution of 1874, with the only exception being the Pontifical Swiss Guard (Latin: Pontificia Cohors Helvetica, Cohors Pedestris Helvetiorum a Sacra Custodia Pontificis; Italian: Guardia Svizzera Pontificia) stationed in Vatican City. The modern Papal Swiss Guard serves as both a ceremonial unit and a bodyguard. Established in 1506, it is one of the oldest military units in the world. The earliest Swiss guard unit to be established on a permanent basis was the Hundred Swiss (Cent Suisses), which served at the French court from 1490 to 1817. This small force was complemented in 1567 by a Swiss Guards
Swiss Guards
regiment
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Thirty Years' War
Peace of Westphalia Protestant
Protestant
princes allowed to continue religious practices Decline of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
mainly, although not exclusively, in northern Europe[9] Habsburg
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Château De Chillon
Chillon
Chillon
Castle
Castle
(French: Château de Chillon) is an island castle located on Lake Geneva
Lake Geneva
(Lac Léman), south of Veytaux
Veytaux
in the canton of Vaud. It is situated at the eastern end of the lake, on the narrow shore between Montreux
Montreux
and Villeneuve, which gives access to the Alpine valley of the Rhône
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Early Modern Europe
Early modern Europe
Europe
is the period of European history
European history
between the end of the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, roughly the late 15th century to the late 18th century
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Achille Marozzo
Achille Marozzo (1484–1553) was an Italian fencing master teaching in the Dardi or Bolognese tradition. Marozzo was probably born in Bologna. His text Opera Nova dell'Arte delle Armi (roughly equivalent to "The New Text on the Art of Arms") was published in 1536 in Modena, dedicated to Count Rangoni, then reprinted several times all the way into the next century. It is considered one of the most important works about fencing in the 16th century. It exemplifies theory, sequences and techniques about combat with different weapons, such as:Sword and Small Buckler Sword and Broad Buckler Sword and Targa Sword and Dagger Sword and Cape Sword-Alone Sword and Rotella Large Dagger with and without Cape Sword for Two Hands Polearms
Polearms
(Lance, Ronca, Spetum, and Partisan) Unarmed against DaggerHe also includes a fairly comprehensive treatise on judicial dueling customs in Italy
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Francesco Alfieri
Francesco Ferdinando Alfieri of Padova
Padova
was a 17th-century master of the Italian school of swordsmanship
Italian school of swordsmanship
and “Maestro D’Arme” to the Accademia Delia in Padua in 1640.Contents1 Works 2 Approach and re
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Lamborghini Espada
The Lamborghini Espada is a 4-seat grand touring coupé built by Italian car manufacturer Lamborghini between 1968 and 1978.Contents1 History1.1 Series I 1.2 Series II 1.3 Series III 1.4 Lamborghini Faena 1.5 Revival attempts2 Specifications 3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The car was designed by Marcello Gandini at Bertone. Gandini drew inspiration and cues from two of his Bertone show cars from 1967, the Lamborghini Marzal and the Jaguar Piraña.[1]Rear viewThe Espada was a four-seater GT, selling alongside the 2+2 400GT and the mid-engined Miura
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