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Rammelsberg
The Rammelsberg
Rammelsberg
is a mountain, 635 metres (2,083 ft) high, on the northern edge of the Harz
Harz
range, south of the historic town of Goslar in the North German state of Lower Saxony
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Summit
A summit is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically, a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak", and "zenith" are synonymous.Contents1 Definition1.1 Western United States 1.2 Summit
Summit
climbing equipment2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit] The term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peak that is located some distance from the nearest point of higher elevation. For example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. A pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Gold
Gold
Gold
is a chemical element with symbol Au (from Latin: aurum) and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold
Gold
often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver (as electrum) and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium
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Silver
Silver
Silver
is a chemical element with symbol Ag (from the Latin
Latin
argentum, derived from the Proto-Indo-European
Proto-Indo-European
h₂erǵ: "shiny" or "white") and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth's crust in the pure, free elemental form ("native silver"), as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining. Silver
Silver
has long been valued as a precious metal
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Osterode Am Harz
For the town in East Prussia
East Prussia
formerly called Osterode, see Ostróda.Osterode am HarzCoat of armsOsterode am HarzLocation of Osterode am Harz
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Anglo-Saxon Settlement Of Britain
The Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain
Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain
describes the process which changed the language and culture of most of what became England
England
from Romano-British
Romano-British
to Germanic.[1] The Germanic-speakers in Britain, themselves of diverse origins, eventually developed a common cultural identity as Anglo-Saxons. This process occurred from the mid-fifth to early seventh centuries, following the end of Roman power in Britain around the year 410. The settlement was followed by the establishment of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the south and east of Britain, later followed by the rest of modern England. The available evidence includes the scanty contemporary and near-contemporary written record, and archaeological and genetic information.[a] The few literary sources tell of hostility between incomers and natives
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Duchy Of Saxony
The Duchy of Saxony
Saxony
(Low German: Hartogdom Sassen, German: Herzogtum Sachsen) was originally the area settled by the Saxons
Saxons
in the late Early Middle Ages, when they were subdued by Charlemagne
Charlemagne
during the Saxon Wars
Saxon Wars
from 772 and incorporated into the Carolingian Empire (Francia) by 804
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Widukind Of Corvey
Widukind
Widukind
of Corvey (c. 925 – after 973) was a medieval Saxon chronicler. His three-volume Res gestae saxonicae sive annalium libri tres is an important chronicle of 10th-century Germany during the rule of the Ottonian dynasty.Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Corvey Abbey
Corvey Abbey
Church, westworkIn view of his name, he possibly was a descendant of the Saxon leader and national hero Widukind, mentioned in the Royal Frankish Annals, who had battled Charlemagne
Charlemagne
in the Saxon Wars
Saxon Wars
from 777 to 785. Widukind
Widukind
the Chronicler entered the Benedictine abbey of Corvey in the Westphalian part of Saxony around 940/42, probably to become a tutor. It is widely assumed that he had reached the age of 15 upon his access, though it has been recently suggested that he may have joined the Order as a child
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Res Gestae Saxonicae Sive Annalium Libri Tres
The Deeds of the Saxons, or Three Books of Annals (Latin: Res gestae saxonicae sive annalium libri tres) is a three-volume chronicle of 10th century Germany written by Widukind
Widukind
of Corvey. Widukind, proud of his people and history, begins his chronicon, not with Rome, but with a brief synopsis derived from the orally-transmitted history of the Saxons, with a terseness that makes his work difficult to interpret. Widukind
Widukind
omits Italian events in tracing the career of Henry the Fowler and he never mentioned a pope.Contents1 Manuscripts 2 Volumes2.1 First 2.2 Second 2.3 Third3 References 4 Editions and translations 5 Secondary literature 6 External linksManuscripts[edit] Widukind's Gesta is known from five manuscripts, one of which came to light at the beginning of the twentieth century. The contexts and dates of the various versions which these represent have occasioned much discussion
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Silver Mining
Silver
Silver
mining is the resource extraction of silver by mining. Silver
Silver
is found in native form very rarely as nuggets, but more usually combined with sulfur, arsenic, antimony, or chlorine and in various ores such as argentite (Ag2S), chlorargyrite ("horn silver," AgCl), and galena (a lead ore often containing significant amounts of silver). As silver is often found in conjunction with these or alloyed with other metals such as gold, it usually must be further extracted through amalgamation or electrolysis. Silver
Silver
mining has been undertaken since early times. As silver is a precious metal often used for coins, its mining has historically often been lucrative. As with other precious metals such as gold or platinum, newly discovered deposits of silver ore have sparked silver rushes of miners seeking their fortunes
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Henry II, Holy Roman Emperor
Henry II (German: Heinrich II; Italian: Enrico II) (6 May 973 – 13 July 1024), also known as Saint
Saint
Henry, Obl. S. B.,[a] was Holy Roman Emperor ("Romanorum Imperator") from 1014 until his death in 1024 and the last member of the Ottonian dynasty
Ottonian dynasty
of Emperors as he had no children. The Duke of Bavaria
Duke of Bavaria
from 995, Henry became King of Germany ("Rex Romanorum") following the sudden death of his second cousin, Emperor Otto III in 1002, was crowned King of Italy
King of Italy
("Rex Italiae") in 1004, and was crowned by the Pope as Emperor in 1014. The son of Henry II, Duke of Bavaria
Henry II, Duke of Bavaria
and his wife Gisela of Burgundy, Emperor Henry II was a great-grandson of German King Henry I and a member of the Bavarian branch of the Ottonian dynasty
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Salian Dynasty
The Salian dynasty
Salian dynasty
(German: Salier; also known as the Frankish dynasty after the family's origin and position as dukes of Franconia) was a dynasty in the High Middle Ages. The dynasty provided four German Kings (1024–1125), all of whom went on to be crowned Holy Roman Emperor (1027–1125); as such, the term Salic dynasty is also used to refer to the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
of the time as a separate term. After the death of the last Saxon of the Ottonian Dynasty
Dynasty
in 1024, the elective titles of King of the Germans
King of the Germans
and then three years later Holy Roman Emperor both passed to the first monarch of the Salian dynasty in the person of Conrad II, the only son of Count Henry of Speyer
Henry of Speyer
and Adelheid of Alsace (both territories in the Franconia of the day)
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Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor
Conrad II (c. 990—4 June 1039), also known as Conrad the Elder and Conrad the Salic, was Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
from 1027 until his death in 1039. The founder of the Salian dynasty
Salian dynasty
of emperors, Conrad also served as King of Germany
King of Germany
from 1024, King of Italy
King of Italy
from 1026, and King of Burgundy
King of Burgundy
from 1033. The son of a mid-level nobleman in Franconia, Count Henry of Speyer and Adelaide of Alsace, he inherited the titles of count of Speyer
Speyer
and of Worms as an infant when his father died. Conrad extended his power beyond his inherited lands, receiving the favor of the princes of the Kingdom of Germany
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