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Ramidreju
In Cantabrian mythology, a ramidreju (Cantabrian: [ramiˈdrehu]) is a creature said to inhabit the mountains and forests of Cantabria, in northern Spain. This animal, which resembles a weasel, is born once every hundred years from a weasel or a marten. These mythological creatures have a very long body, like a snake, and their fur is slightly green-colored. Its eyes are yellow and its nose is like that of a hog, which it uses to dig very deep holes
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Sun Of The Dead
Sun of the Dead (Russian : Солнце Мёртвых) is the second studio album by the Russian folk metal band Satanakozel (Russian : СатанаКозёл)
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Jupiter (mythology)
Jupiter, also known as Jove (Latin: Iūpiter [ˈjuːpɪtɛr] or Iuppiter [ˈjʊppɪtɛr],[1] gen. Iovis [ˈjɔwɪs]), is the god of the sky and thunder and king of the gods in Ancient Roman religion
Ancient Roman religion
and mythology. Jupiter
Jupiter
was the chief deity of Roman state religion throughout the Republican and Imperial eras, until Christianity became the dominant religion of the Empire. In Roman mythology, he negotiates with Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome, to establish principles of Roman religion such as offering, or sacrifice. Jupiter
Jupiter
is usually thought to have originated as a sky god. His identifying implement is the thunderbolt and his primary sacred animal is the eagle,[2] which held precedence over other birds in the taking of auspices[3] and became one of the most common symbols of the Roman army (see Aquila)
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Deva River
The Deva is a river in Northern Spain, flowing through the Autonomous Communities of Cantabria
Cantabria
and Asturias
Asturias
until it joins the Cares
Cares
River and flows into the Atlantic Ocean, in the Bay of Biscay, where they form the Tina Mayor estuary which is the natural border between Asturias
Asturias
and Cantabria. See also[edit]List of rivers of SpainThis article about a location in the Principality of Asturias, Spain, is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to Cantabria, Spain
Spain
is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to a river in Spain
Spain
is a stub
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Midsummer
Midsummer, also known as Saint John's Day, is the period of time centered upon the summer solstice, and more specifically the northern European celebrations that accompany the actual solstice or take place on a day between June 19 and June 25 and the preceding evening. The exact dates vary between different cultures. The undivided Christian Church designated June 24 as the feast day of the early Christian martyr St John the Baptist, and the observance of St John's Day begins the evening before, known as St John's Eve. These are commemorated by many Christian denominations, such as the Roman Catholic Church, Lutheran Churches, and Anglican Communion.[1][7] In Sweden
Sweden
the Midsummer
Midsummer
is such an important festivity that there have been serious discussions to make the Midsummer's Eve into the National Day of Sweden, instead of June 6. It may also be referred to as St
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St John's Eve
Eve
Eve
(/ˈiːv/; Hebrew: חַוָּה‬, Modern Chava, Tiberian Ḥawwāh; Arabic: حَوَّاء‎, translit. Ḥawwā’; Syriac: ܚܘܐ) is a figure in the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible. According to the creation myth[1] of the Abrahamic religions, she was the first woman. In Islamic tradition, Eve
Eve
is known as Adam's wife and the first woman although she is not specifically named in the Quran. According to the second chapter of Genesis, Eve
Eve
was created by God (Yahweh) by taking her from the rib[2] of Adam, to be Adam's companion. She succumbs to the serpent's temptation to eat the forbidden fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. She shares the fruit with Adam, and as a result the first humans are expelled from the Garden of Eden
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Arquetu
The Arquetu is a mythological being that appears in Cantabrian mythology as an old man with the drawing of a green cross and 7 keys on his forehead. He lends money to those foolish enough to spend their fortune but if they do it again, he punishes them by giving them a curse of eternal poverty.[1] References[edit]^ Hernúñez, Pollux, Monstruos, Duendes Y Seres Fantasticos De La Mitología Cantabra, pg. 100This mythology-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to Cantabria, Spain
Spain
is a stub
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Anjana (Cantabrian Mythology)
Anjana may refer to:Anjana, the village in Grahi taluka, district Banswara Rajasthan Añjanā, the mother of Hanuman in the Indian epic, the Ramayana. Anjana (Cantabrian mythology), a witch in Cantabrian mythology. Anjana, Faizabad, a poor village in Faizabad District, Uttar Pradesh, India. Añjana, a king of the Koliya dynasty of ancient India.This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Anjana. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Samhain
Samhain
Samhain
(/ˈsɑːwɪn, ˈsaʊɪn/; Irish: [sˠəuɪnʲ]) is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the "darker half" of the year. Traditionally, it is celebrated from 31 October to 1 November, as the Celtic day began and ended at sunset. This is about halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice. It is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals, along with Imbolc, Bealtaine
Bealtaine
and Lughnasadh. Historically, it was widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man
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All Saints' Day
All Saints' Day, also known as All Hallows' Day, Hallowmas,[3][4] Feast of All Saints,[5][6] or Solemnity
Solemnity
of All Saints,[7] is a Christian festival celebrated in honour of all the saints, known and unknown. In Western Christianity, it is celebrated on 1 November by the Roman Catholic
Catholic
Church, the Anglican Communion, the Methodist Church, the Lutheran Church, and other Protestant churches
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Neptune (mythology)
Neptune (Latin: Neptūnus [nɛpˈtuːnʊs]) was the god of freshwater and the sea[1] in Roman religion
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Mars (mythology)
In ancient Roman religion and myth, Mars
Mars
(Latin: Mārs, [maːrs]) was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian, a combination characteristic of early Rome.[2] He was second in importance only to Jupiter and he was the most prominent of the military gods in the religion of the Roman army. Most of his festivals were held in March, the month named for him (Latin Martius), and in October, which began the season for military campaigning and ended the season for farming. Under the influence of Greek culture, Mars
Mars
was identified with the Greek god Ares,[3] whose myths were reinterpreted in Roman literature and art under the name of Mars
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Janus
In ancient Roman religion and myth, Janus
Janus
(/ˈdʒeɪnəs/; Latin: IANVS (Iānus), pronounced [ˈjaː.nus]) is the god of beginnings, gates, transitions, time, duality, doorways,[1] passages, and endings. He is usually depicted as having two faces, since he looks to the future and to the past. It is conventionally thought that the month of January
January
is named for Janus
Janus
(Ianuarius),[2] but according to ancient Roman farmers' almanacs Juno was the tutelary deity of the month.[3] Janus
Janus
presided over the beginning and ending of conflict, and hence war and peace. The gates of a building in Rome named after him, not a temple as it is often called, but an open enclosure with gates at each end, were opened in time of war, and closed to mark the arrival of peace (which did not happen very often)
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List Of Roman Deities
A vast number[vague] of ancient Roman deities are known by name. The most familiar today are those the Romans identified with Greek counterparts (see interpretatio graeca), integrating Greek myths, iconography, and sometimes religious practices into Roman culture, including Latin literature, Roman art, and religious life as it was experienced throughout the Empire. Many of the Romans' own gods remain obscure, known only by name and function, through inscriptions and texts that are often fragmentary. This is particularly of those gods belonging to the archaic religion of the Romans dating back to the era of kings, the so-called "religion of Numa," which was perpetuated or revived over the centuries. Some archaic deities have Italic or Etruscan counterparts, as identified both by ancient sources and by modern scholars
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