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Ralph Vary Chamberlin
Ralph Vary Chamberlin[a] (January 3, 1879 – October 31, 1967) was an American biologist, ethnographer, and historian from Salt Lake City, Utah. He was a faculty member of the University of Utah
Utah
for over 25 years, where he helped establish the School of Medicine and served as its first dean, and later became head of the zoology department. He also taught at Brigham Young University
Brigham Young University
and the University of Pennsylvania, and worked for over a decade at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University, where he described species from around the world. Chamberlin was a prolific taxonomist who named over 4,000 new animal species in over 400 scientific publications. He specialized in arachnids (spiders, scorpions, and relatives) and myriapods (centipedes, millipedes, and relatives), ranking among the most prolific arachnologists and myriapodologists in history
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Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
(often shortened to Salt Lake and abbreviated as SLC) is the capital and the most populous municipality of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Utah. With an estimated population of 190,884 in 2014,[7] the city is the core of the Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
metropolitan area, which has a population of 1,153,340 (2014 estimate). Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
is further situated within a larger metropolis known as the Salt Lake City–Ogden–Provo Combined Statistical Area
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Hopkins Marine Station
Hopkins Marine Station
Hopkins Marine Station
is the marine laboratory of Stanford University. It is located ninety miles south of the university's main campus, in Pacific Grove, California
Pacific Grove, California
(United States) on the Monterey Peninsula, adjacent to the Monterey Bay Aquarium. It is home to nine research laboratories and a fluctuating population of graduate and undergraduate students. It has also been used for archaeological exploration including that of the Chinese-American fishing village that existed on the site before being burnt down.Contents1 History 2 Hopkins Marine Life Refuge 3 Research at Hopkins3.1 Researchers4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]Agassiz Building viewed from Monterey Bay Aquarium
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The Church Of Jesus Christ Of Latter-day Saints
The Church of Jesus
Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints (known as the LDS Church or, informally, the Mormon Church) is a Nontrinitarian, Christian restorationist church that is considered by its members to be the restoration of the original church founded by Jesus
Jesus
Christ. The church is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, and has established congregations and built temples worldwide
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Mormon
Mormons
Mormons
are a religious and cultural group related to Mormonism, the principal branch of the Latter Day Saint movement
Latter Day Saint movement
of Restorationist Christianity, initiated by Joseph Smith
Joseph Smith
in upstate New York during the 1820s. After Smith's death in 1844, the Mormons
Mormons
followed Brigham Young to what would become the Utah
Utah
Territory. Today, most Mormons
Mormons
are understood to be members of The Church of Jesus
Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Some Mormons
Mormons
are also either independent or non-practicing
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Evolution
Evolution
Evolution
is change in the heritable characteristics of biological populations over successive generations.[1][2] Evolutionary processes give rise to biodiversity at every level of biological organisation, including the levels of species, individual organisms, and molecules.[3] Repeated formation of new species (speciation), change within species (anagenesis), and loss of species (extinction) throughout the evolutionary history of life on Earth are demonstrated by shared sets of morphological and biochemical traits, including shared DNA sequences.[4] These shared traits are more similar among species that share a more recent common ancestor, and can be used to reconstruct a biological "tree of life" based on evolutionary relationships (phylogenetics), using both existing species and fossils
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Biblical Criticism
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t e Biblical
Biblical
criticism is the scholarly "study and investigation of biblical writings that seeks to make discerning judgments about these writings".[1] Viewing biblical texts as being ordinary pieces of literature, rather than set apart from other literature, as in the traditional view, it asks when and where a particular text originated; how, why, by whom, for whom, and in what circumstances it was produced; what influences were at work in its production; what sources were used in its composition; and what message it was intended to convey. It will vary slightly depending on whether the focus is on the Hebrew Bible, the Old Testament, the letters of New Testament
New Testament
or the canonical gospels
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Modernism
Modernism
Modernism
is a philosophical movement that, along with cultural trends and changes, arose from wide-scale and far-reaching transformations in Western society during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Among the factors that shaped modernism were the development of modern industrial societies and the rapid growth of cities, followed then by reactions of horror to World War I. Modernism
Modernism
also rejected the certainty of Enlightenment thinking, and many modernists rejected religious belief.[2][3] Modernism, in general, includes the activities and creations of those who felt the traditional forms of art, architecture, literature, religious faith, philosophy, social organization, activities of daily life, and even the sciences, were becoming ill-fitted to their tasks and outdated in the new economic, social, and political environment of an emerging fully industrialized world
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Massachusetts Bay Colony
The Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Colony (1628–1691) was an English settlement on the east coast of North America in the 17th century around the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay, the northernmost of the several colonies later reorganized as the Province of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay. The lands of the settlement were located in southern New England
New England
in what is now Massachusetts, with initial settlements situated on two natural harbors and surrounding land, about 15.4 miles (24.8 km) apart[1]—the areas around the present-day cities of Salem and Boston. The territory nominally administered by the colony included much of present-day central New England, including portions of the U.S. states of Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. Territory claimed but never administered by the colonial government extended as far west as the Pacific Ocean
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Pennsylvania Dutch
The Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Dutch (Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch,  listen (help·info)) are a cultural group formed by early German-speaking immigrants to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and their descendants. The word "Dutch" does not refer to the Dutch people
Dutch people
or Dutch language, but to the German settlers, known as Deutsch (in standard German) and Deitsch (in the principal dialect they spoke, Palatine German). Most emigrated to the Americas from Germany
Germany
or Switzerland
Switzerland
in the 17th and 18th century. Over time, the various dialects spoken by these immigrants fused into a unique dialect of German known as Pennsylvania German or Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
"Dutch"
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LDS High School
LDS High School (previously known as Salt Lake Stake Academy[1] or Latter-day Saints' High School, and sometimes spelled Latter-day Saints High School) was a secondary school located in Salt Lake City, Utah operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The school was closely associated with Latter-day Saints' University, the last vestiges of which are now LDS Business College. Both trace their beginnings to the Salt Lake Stake Academy, which started in 1886. The LDS High School name was adopted in 1927. In 1931, LDS High School was closed, leaving about 1,000 students to attend public high schools, most notably the newly built South High, which opened in the fall of the same year. The closure was a late example of a process of closure of most LDS run secondary schools in the Utah area. Notable alumni[edit] Gordon B. Hinckley
Gordon B

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Latter-day Saints' University
LDS Business College (LDSBC) is a two-year college in Salt Lake City, Utah, focused on training students in business and industry. The college is owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and operates under its Church Educational System. LDSBC offers one year certificates and two-year degrees in business administration, interior design, and healthcare. The college also furnishes an Institute of Religion. It is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.[6]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksHistory[edit]The Latter-day Saints' University in 1905.Current home of the college at the Triad Center in Salt Lake City.LDS Business College façade.The Salt Lake Academy was founded in 1886, with high school, normal, business and college courses of study. In 1888, it was renamed the Salt Lake Stake Academy, and a year later it was again renamed, this time Latter-day Saints' University
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Stanford University
Stanford University
University
(officially Leland Stanford
Leland Stanford
Junior University,[11] colloquially the Farm) is a private research university in Stanford, California. Because of its academic strength, wealth, and proximity to Silicon Valley, Stanford is often cited as one of the world's most prestigious universities.[12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19] The university was founded in 1885 by Leland and Jane Stanford
Jane Stanford
in memory of their only child, Leland Stanford
Leland Stanford
Jr., who had died of typhoid fever at age 15 the previous year. Stanford was a former Governor of California
California
and U.S. Senator; he made his fortune as a railroad tycoon
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Utah
Utah
Utah
(/ˈjuːtɔː/ YOO-taw, /-tɑː/ -tah  listen) is a state in the western United States. It became the 45th state admitted to the U.S. on January 4, 1896. Utah
Utah
is the 13th-largest by area, 31st-most-populous, and 10th-least-densely populated of the 50 United States. Utah
Utah
has a population of more than 3 million (Census estimate for July 1, 2016)
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Gamma Alpha
The Gamma Alpha Graduate Scientific Society (ΓΑ) is a non-profit fraternal organization (501(c)(7)) in the United States which fosters interdisciplinary dialogue among graduate students through its local chapters. The Society’s chapters have often been headquartered in chapter houses, akin to residential cooperatives, though there have been many chapters which lacked a chapter house. Where established, chapter houses have served as venues for the academic talks hosted by the Society
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Sigma Xi
Sigma
Sigma
Xi: The Scientific Research
Research
Honor Society
Honor Society
(ΣΞ) is a non-profit honor society for scientists and engineers which was founded in 1886 at Cornell University
Cornell University
by a junior faculty member and a handful of graduate students.[2] Members elect others on the basis of their research achievements or potential.Contents1 Information about 2 Motto and name 3 Notable Alumni 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksInformation about[edit] Sigma
Sigma
Xi has nearly 100,000 members[3] who were elected to membership based on their research achievements and potential. It has more than 500 chapters[4] in North America and around the world
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