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Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives And Collections
The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is housed in the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage in Washington, D.C., United States. It is one of the Smithsonian archive collections; as such it serves as a pillar of institutional memory, preserving manuscripts, sound recordings, moving images, and other records of enduring cultural, scientific, historical, and legal value within museums, research centers, governments, businesses, and communities. The Ralph Rinzler Archives consist of two major collections. The first is the Moses and Frances Asch collection, which consists of the original recordings, business records, correspondence, and photographic material that came to the Smithsonian with the purchase of Folkways Records
Folkways Records
in 1987. It also contains recordings on the Paredon, Cook, Dyer-Bennet, Fast Folk, and Monitor labels that have been subsequently acquired by the Smithsonian
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Smithsonian Center For Folklife And Cultural Heritage
The Center for Folklife & Cultural Heritage (CFCH) is one of three cultural centers within the Smithsonian Institution.[1] With a motto of “culture of, by, and for the people”, its expressed role is to act as steward and ambassador to cultures around the world. It does this by encouraging understanding and cultural sustainability through research, education, and community engagement. The CFCH differs in important aspects from the more conventional museums within the Smithsonian complex. Although it contains (numerically) the largest collection in the Smithsonian, it is not outward facing to the public.[note 1] Its budget comes primarily from grants, trust monies, federal appropriations, and gifts, with only a small percentage coming out the main Smithsonian budget.[2] The center is composed of three distinct units. The Smithsonian Folklife Festival is planned and implemented annually by the Festival staff at the Folklife center
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Moe Asch
Moses Asch (December 2, 1905 – October 19, 1986), often known as Moe Asch, was a Polish-American
Polish-American
recording engineer and record executive. He founded Asch Records, which then changed its name to Folkways Records when the label transitioned from 78 RPM
78 RPM
recordings to LP records. Asch ran the Folkways label from 1948 until his death in 1986. Folkways was very influential in bringing folk music into the American cultural mainstream. Some of America's greatest folk songs were originally recorded for Asch, including "This Land Is Your Land" by Woody Guthrie
Woody Guthrie
and "Goodnight Irene" by Lead Belly
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Folkways Records
Folkways Records
Folkways Records
was a record label founded by Moses Asch that documented folk, world, and children's music. It was acquired by the Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
in 1987 and is now part of Smithsonian Folkways.Contents1 History 2 Smithsonian 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Folkways Records
Folkways Records
& Service Co. was founded by Moses Asch and Marian Distler in 1948 in New York City. Harold Courlander was editor of the Folkways Ethnic Library at the time and is credited with coming up with the name "Folkways" for the label.[1] Asch sought to record and document sounds and music from everywhere in the world. From 1948 until Asch's death in 1986, Folkways Records
Folkways Records
released 2,168 albums
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Richard Dyer-Bennet
Richard Dyer-Bennet
Richard Dyer-Bennet
(October 6, 1913 in Leicester, England
England
– December 14, 1991 in Monterey, Massachusetts) was an English-born American folk singer (or his own preferred term, "minstrel"), recording a
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Fast Folk
Fast Folk Musical Magazine
Magazine
(originally known as The CooP), was a combination magazine and record album published from February 1982 to 1997. The magazine acted as a songwriter/performer cooperative, and was an outlet for singer-songwriters to release their first recordings.Contents1 History 2 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] In December 1977, singer/songwriter Carolyne Mas
Carolyne Mas
started a songwriter's night at The Cornelia Street Cafe
Cornelia Street Cafe
in Greenwich Village, New York, after a less formal group started by singer/songwriter/ Greenwich Village
Greenwich Village
legend Jack Hardy lost its spot at a local tavern called The English Pub
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Smithsonian Folkways Recordings
Smithsonian Folkways
Smithsonian Folkways
is the nonprofit record label of the Smithsonian Institution. It is a part of the Smithsonian's Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, located at Capital Gallery in downtown Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
The label was founded in 1987 after the family of Moses Asch, founder of Folkways Records, donated the entire Folkways Records label to the Smithsonian. The donation was made on the condition that the Institution continue Asch's policy that each of the more than 2,000 albums of Folkways Records
Folkways Records
remain in print forever, regardless of sales. Since then, the label has expanded on Asch’s vision of documenting the sounds of the world, adding six other record labels to the collection, as well as releasing over 300 new recordings
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American Folk Music Revival
The American folk-music revival began during the 1940s and peaked in popularity in the mid-1960s. Its roots went earlier, and performers like Josh White, Burl Ives, Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly, Big Bill Broonzy, Richard Dyer-Bennet, Oscar Brand, Jean Ritchie, John Jacob Niles, Susan Reed, Paul Robeson
Paul Robeson
and Cisco Houston had enjoyed a limited general popularity in the 1930s and 1940s
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National Mall
The National Mall
National Mall
is a landscaped park within the National Mall
National Mall
and Memorial Parks, an official unit of the United States
United States
National Park System
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Cook Records
Cook Records was a record label founded by Emory Cook (1913–2002), an audio engineer and inventor. From 1952 to 1966, Cook used his Sounds of our Times and Cook Laboratories record labels to demonstrate his philosophy about sound, recording equipment, and manufacturing techniques.[1]Contents1 Recording techniques 2 Cook Records2.1 Genres 2.2 Binaural recording 2.3 The Clip-on 2.4 Tonearm 2.5 Preamp 2.6 Microfusion pressing 2.7 Unusual recordings 2.8 Stereo 2.9 Remains of the company3 See also 4 References 5 External linksRecording techniques[edit] In addition to Sounds of Our Times, Cook released Road Recordings, a "White Label" series, test and binaural recordings.[2] Cook is sometimes said[citation needed] to have intended only to show the quality of his recording and molding process at an audio fair, with the added feature of binaural (i.e., stereophonic) sound to get attention
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Smithsonian Folklife Festival
The Smithsonian Folklife Festival, launched in 1967, is an international exhibition of living cultural heritage presented annually in the summer in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
in the United States.[1] It is held for two weeks around the Fourth of July
Fourth of July
(the U.S. Independence Day) holiday.[1] The Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage produces the Festival.[1] Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival
2014The Festival is free to the public, encouraging cultural exchange.[1] Attracting more than one million visitors yearly, the two-week-long celebration is the largest annual cultural event in the United States capital
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Lee Hays
Lee Hays (March 14, 1914 – August 26, 1981) was an American folk-singer and songwriter, best known for singing bass with The Weavers. Throughout his life, he was concerned with overcoming racism, inequality, and violence in society. He wrote or co-wrote "Wasn't That a Time?", "If I Had a Hammer", and "Kisses Sweeter than Wine", which became Weavers' staples. He also familiarized audiences with songs of the 1930s labor movement, such as "We Shall Not Be Moved".Contents1 Childhood 2 Teenage years 3 Commonwealth College 4 The Almanacs and World War II 5 People's Songs 6 The Weavers and the Red Scare 7 Later life 8 References 9 External sourcesChildhood[edit] Hays came naturally by his interest in folk music since his uncle was the eminent Missouri and Arkansas
Arkansas
folklorist Vance Randolph,[1] author of the bestselling Pissing in the Snow and Other Ozark Folktales and Who Blewed Up the Church House?, among other works
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Ralph Rinzler
Ralph Rinzler (July 20, 1934 – July 2, 1994) was a mandolin player, folksinger, and the co-founder of the annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival on the Mall every summer in Washington, D.C., where he worked as a curator for American art, music, and folk culture at the Smithsonian.[1] This festival was from the beginning and continues to be a major event for musicians, artistans, and craftsman from a broad variety of American culture, including African American, Native American, Appalachian, Southern, Western and other groups in the United States.[2] Biography[edit] Ralph Rinzler grew up in Passaic, New Jersey. His father was a doctor of Russian-Jewish descent.[3][4] While in High School, Rinzler became a friend and mentor to younger Passaic resident David Grisman. Rinzler went to Swarthmore College
Swarthmore College
where he began performing as a mandolin player in various folk music groups in the mid to late 1950s
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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