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Ralph Bunche
Ralph Johnson Bunche (/bʌntʃ/; August 7, 1904[1][2][3]  – December 9, 1971) was an American political scientist, academic, and diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize
Nobel Peace Prize
for his late 1940s mediation in Israel.[2] He was the first African American to be so honored in the history of the prize.[4] He was involved in the formation and administration of the United Nations. In 1963, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom
Presidential Medal of Freedom
by President John F. Kennedy. For more than two decades (1928 to 1950), Bunche served as chair of the Department of Political Science at Howard University, where he also taught generations of students
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Alger Hiss
Alger Hiss
Alger Hiss
(November 11, 1904 – November 15, 1996) was an American government official who was accused of being a Soviet spy in 1948[1] and convicted of perjury in connection with this charge in 1950. Before he was tried and convicted, he was involved in the establishment of the United Nations
United Nations
both as a U.S. State Department official and as a U.N. official. In later life he worked as a lecturer and author. On August 3, 1948, Whittaker Chambers, a former U.S. Communist Party member, testified under subpoena before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) that Hiss had secretly been a Communist, while in federal service. Called before HUAC, Hiss categorically denied the charge
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Debate
Debate
Debate
is contention in argument; strife, dissension, quarrelling, controversy; especially a formal discussion of subjects before a public assembly or legislature, in Parliament
Parliament
or in any deliberative assembly.[1] Logical consistency, factual accuracy and some degree of emotional appeal to the audience are elements in debating, where one side often prevails over the other party by presenting a superior "context" or framework of the issue. In a formal debating contest, there are rules for participants to discuss and decide on differences, within a framework defining how they will interact. Debating is carried out in debating chambers and assemblies of various types to discuss matters and to make resolutions about action to be taken, often by voting.[citation needed] Deliberative bodies such as parliaments, legislative assemblies, and meetings of all sorts engage in debates
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Detroit
Detroit
Detroit
(/dɪˈtrɔɪt/)[6] is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, the largest city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of Wayne County. The municipality of Detroit
Detroit
had a 2016 estimated population of 672,795, making it the 23rd-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area, known as Metro Detroit, is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest
Midwest
after Chicago. Detroit
Detroit
is a major port on the Detroit
Detroit
River, one of the four major straits that connect the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. The Detroit Metropolitan Airport
Detroit Metropolitan Airport
is among the most important hubs in the United States
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Alton, Illinois
Alton is a city on the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in Madison County, Illinois, United States, about 15 miles (24 km) north of St. Louis, Missouri. The population was 27,865 at the 2010 census. It is a part of the Metro-East
Metro-East
region of the Greater St. Louis
Greater St. Louis
metropolitan area. It is famous for its limestone bluffs along the river north of the city, for its role preceding and during the American Civil War, and as the hometown of jazz musician Miles Davis
Miles Davis
and Robert Wadlow, the tallest known person in history. It was the site of the last Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas
Stephen Douglas
debate in October 1858
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Free People Of Color
The term free people of color (French: gens de couleur libres), in the context of the history of slavery in the Americas, at first specifically referred to people of mixed African and European descent who were not enslaved. The term was especially used in the French colonies, including La Louisiane and settlements on Caribbean
Caribbean
islands, such as Saint-Domingue
Saint-Domingue
(Haiti), Guadeloupe, and Martinique. Freed African slaves were included in the term affranchis, but historically they were considered as distinct from the free people of color. In these territories and major cities, particularly New Orleans, and those cities held by the Spanish, a substantial third class of primarily mixed-race, free people developed
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American Revolution
The American Revolution
Revolution
was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States
United States
of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War in alliance with France and others. Members of American colonial society argued the position of "no taxation without representation", starting with the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. They rejected the authority of the British Parliament to tax them because they lacked members in that governing body
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Toledo, Ohio
Toledo (/təˈliːdoʊ/) is a city in and the county seat of Lucas County, Ohio, United States.[6] Toledo is in northwest Ohio, at the western end of Lake Erie
Lake Erie
bordering the state of Michigan. The city was founded by United States
United States
citizens in 1833 on the west bank of the Maumee River, and originally incorporated as part of Monroe County, Michigan
Michigan
Territory. It was re-founded in 1837, after conclusion of the Toledo War, when it was incorporated in Ohio. After the 1845 completion of the Miami and Erie Canal, Toledo grew quickly; it also benefited from its position on the railway line between New York City
City
and Chicago. The first of many glass manufacturers arrived in the 1880s, eventually earning Toledo its nickname: "The Glass City"
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Ohio
Ohio
Ohio
/oʊˈhaɪ.oʊ/ ( listen) is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region
Great Lakes region
of the United States. Ohio
Ohio
is the 34th largest by area, the 7th most populous, and the 10th most densely populated of the 50 United States. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus. The state takes its name from the Ohio
Ohio
River
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Albuquerque, New Mexico
Albuquerque (/ˈælbəˌkɜːrki/ ( listen) AL-bə-kur-kee; in Navajo
Navajo
Beeʼeldííl Dahsinil, pronounced [pèːʔèltíːl tɑ̀xsɪ̀nɪ̀l], Arawageeki in Keres; Vakêêke in Jemez Towa; Gołgéeki in Jicarilla Apache) is the most populous city in the U.S. state of New Mexico. The city serves as the county seat of Bernalillo County,[5] and it is situated in the north central part of the state, straddling the Rio Grande. The city population is 559,277 as of the July 1, 2016 population estimate from the United States
United States
Census Bureau,[1] and ranks as the 32nd-largest city in the U.S. The Albuquerque metropolitan statistical area (or MSA) has a population of 909,906 according to the United States
United States
Census Bureau's most recently available estimate for 2016.[6] Albuquerque is the 60th-largest United States metropolitan area
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Suicide
Suicide
Suicide
is the act of intentionally causing one's own death.[6] Risk factors include mental disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, personality disorders, and substance abuse, including alcoholism and use of benzodiazepines.[2][4][7] Other suicides are impulsive acts due to stress such as from financial difficulties, troubles with relationships, or from bullying.[2][8] Those who have previously attempted suicide are at higher risk for future attempts.[2]
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Valedictorian
Valedictorian is an academic title of success used in the United States, Canada, Central America, and the Philippines for the student who delivers the closing or farewell statement at a graduation ceremony (called a valediction). The chosen valedictorian is often the student with the highest ranking (highest Grade Point Average, or GPA for short) among their graduating class.[1] The term is an Anglicised derivation of the Latin
Latin
vale dicere ("to say farewell"), historically rooted in the valedictorian's traditional role as the final speaker at the graduation ceremony before the students receive their diplomas. The valedictory address generally is considered a final farewell to classmates, before they disperse to pursue their individual paths after graduating. In Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Ireland, India, Pakistan and the United Kingdom, the title valedictorian is not used frequently
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South Los Angeles
South Los Angeles, formerly known as South Central, is a region in southern Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County, California
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Phi Beta Kappa
The Phi Beta Kappa Society
Phi Beta Kappa Society
(ΦΒΚ) is the oldest honor society for the liberal arts and sciences in the United States
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Political Science
Political science is a social science which deals with systems of governance, and the analysis of political activities, political thoughts and political behavior.[1] It deals extensively with the theory and practice of politics which is commonly thought of as determining of the distribution of power and resources. Political scientists "see themselves engaged in revealing the relationships underlying political events and conditions, and from these revelations they attempt to construct general principles about the way the world of politics works."[2] Political science comprises numerous subfields, including comparative politics, political economy, international relations, political theory, public administration, public policy, and political methodology
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Historically Black College
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era New Great MigrationCultureStudies Art Business history Black conductors Black mecca Black sc
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