HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Raja Rao
Raja Rao
Raja Rao
(8 November 1908 – 8 July 2006) was an Indian writer of English-language novels and short stories, whose works are deeply rooted in Metaphysics. The Serpent and the Rope
The Serpent and the Rope
(1960), a semi-autobiographical novel recounting a search for spiritual truth in Europe and India, established him as one of the finest Indian prose stylists and won him the Sahitya Akademi Award
Sahitya Akademi Award
in 1964.[1] For the entire body of his work, Rao was awarded the Neustadt International Prize for Literature in 1988
[...More...]

"Raja Rao" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hassan, Karnataka
Hassan is a town and the district headquarters of Hassan district
Hassan district
in the Indian state of Karnataka. The town is situated 980 m (3,220 ft) above sea level.[1] It is named after the Hasanamba temple.[2] Hassan is 183 kilometres (114 mi) west of Bangalore, 119 kilometres (74 mi) north of Mysore, and 171 kilometres (106 mi) east of Mangalore
Mangalore
by road. The urban population in 2011 was 133,436.[3]City park in HassanContents1 History 2 Demographics 3 Transport3.1 Road4 Climate 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Hassan dates from beginnings of the Hoysala Empire
Hoysala Empire
in the 11th century.[4][5] Demographics[edit]Hassan in 1900As of the 2011 Indian census,[3] the town of Hassan had an urban population of 133,436. Males were 49.5% of the population and females 50.5%. The average literacy rate was 80.8%
[...More...]

"Hassan, Karnataka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brahmins
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


[...More...]
"Brahmins" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mysore Kingdom
The Kingdom of Mysore
Mysore
was a kingdom in southern India, traditionally believed to have been founded in 1399 in the vicinity of the modern city of Mysore. The kingdom, which was ruled by the Wodeyar
Wodeyar
family, initially served as a vassal state of the Vijayanagara
Vijayanagara
Empire. With the decline of the Vijayanagara Empire
Vijayanagara Empire
(c. 1565), the kingdom became independent
[...More...]

"Mysore Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ram Mohan Roy
Raja
Raja
Ram Mohan Roy
Ram Mohan Roy
(22 May 1772 – 26 September 1833) was the founder of the Brahmo
Brahmo
Sabha movement in 1828, which engendered the Brahmo Samaj, an influential social-religious reform movement.[1] His influence was apparent in the fields of politics, public administration and education as well as religion. He was known for his efforts to abolish the practice of sati, the Hindu
Hindu
funeral practice in which the widow was compelled to sacrifice herself in her husband’s funeral pyre in some parts of Bengal
[...More...]

"Ram Mohan Roy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jawaharlal Nehru
Jawaharlal Nehru
Jawaharlal Nehru
(/ˈneɪruː, ˈnɛruː/;[1] Hindustani: [ˈdʒəʋaːɦərˈlaːl ˈneːɦru] ( listen); 14 November 1889 – 27 May 1964) was the first Prime Minister of India
India
and a central figure in Indian politics before and after independence. He emerged as the paramount leader of the Indian independence movement
Indian independence movement
under the tutelage of Mahatma Gandhi
Mahatma Gandhi
and ruled India
India
from its establishment as an independent nation in 1947 until his death in 1964. He is considered to be the architect of the modern Indian nation-state: a sovereign, socialist, secular, and democratic republic
[...More...]

"Jawaharlal Nehru" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quit India Movement
           Motto: Jai HindPeopleLists of people from India by stateHistoryIndian independence movement Quit India MovementCultureArchitecture Art Cinema Cuisine Dance Festivals Literature Music SportsLanguagesHindi English (Indian) Other regional languagesReligion Hinduism
Hinduism
(Temples) Islam Christianity Sikhism Jainism (Temples) Buddhism in India Zoroastrianism Bahá'í Faithv t eThe
[...More...]

"Quit India Movement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bombay
Mumbai
Mumbai
(/mʊmˈbaɪ/; also known as Bombay, the official name until 1995) is the capital city of the Indian state of Maharashtra. It is the most populous city in India
India
with an estimated city proper population of 12.4 million as of 2011
[...More...]

"Bombay" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gandhi
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (/ˈɡɑːndi, ˈɡæn-/;[3] Hindustani: [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( listen); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India
India
to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable")[4]—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa[5]—is now used worldwide
[...More...]

"Gandhi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nonviolence
Nonviolence
Nonviolence
is the personal practice of being harmless to self and others under every condition. It comes from the belief that hurting people, animals or the environment is unnecessary to achieve an outcome and refers to a general philosophy of abstention from violence. This may be based on moral, religious or spiritual principles, or it may be for purely strategic or pragmatic reasons.[1] Nonviolence
Nonviolence
also has 'active' or 'activist' elements, in that believers accept the need for nonviolence as a means to achieve political and social change. Thus, for example, the Tolstoy and Gandhian non violence is a philosophy and strategy for social change that rejects the use of violence, but at the same time sees nonviolent action (also called civil resistance) as an alternative to passive acceptance of oppression or armed struggle against it
[...More...]

"Nonviolence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Texas At Austin
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
[...More...]

"University Of Texas At Austin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pariahs
An outcast is someone who is rejected or 'cast out', as from home or society,[1] or in some way excluded, looked down upon, or ignored. In common English speech an outcast may be anyone who does not fit in with normal society, which can contribute to a sense of isolation.Contents1 History 2 Exiles 3 In the Bible 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Pariahs of Madras a German engraving, 1870sIn Ancient Greece the Athenians had a procedure known as "ostracism" in which all citizens could write a person's name on a shard of broken pottery (called ostraka) and later place it in a large container in a public location. If an individual were to have his or her name written a sufficient number of times, they would be subject to "ostracism" and banished from the city for ten years. This was normally practiced against individuals who had behaved in a manner that was in some way offensive to the community. Exiles[edit] To be exiled is to be away from one's home (i.e
[...More...]

"Pariahs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hyderabad
Hyderabad
Hyderabad
(/ˈhaɪdərəˌbɑːd/ ( listen) HY-dər-ə-bAHd; often /ˈhaɪdrəˌbɑːd/) is the capital of the Indian state of Telangana
Telangana
and de jure capital of Andhra Pradesh.[A] Occupying 650 square kilometres (250 sq mi) along the banks of the Musi River, it has a population of about 6.7 million and a metropolitan population of about 7.75 million, making it the fourth most populous city and sixth most populous urban agglomeration in India
[...More...]

"Hyderabad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Class Discrimination
Class discrimination, also known as classism, is prejudice or discrimination on the basis of social class. It includes individual attitudes, behaviors, systems of policies, and practices that are set up to benefit the upper class at the expense of the lower class or vice versa.[1]Contents1 History 2 Institutional versus personal classism 3 Media representation 4 Legislation 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] Class structures existed in a simplified form in pre-agricultural societies, but became much more complex and established following the establishment of permanent agriculture-based civilizations with a food surplus.[2] Classism started to be practiced around the 18th century.[3] Institutional versus personal classism[edit] The term classism can refer to personal prejudice against lower or upper classes as well as to institutional classism, just as the term racism can refer either strictly to personal prejudice or to institutional racism
[...More...]

"Class Discrimination" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mahatma Gandhi
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (/ˈɡɑːndi, ˈɡæn-/;[3] Hindustani: [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( listen); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India
India
to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable")[4]—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa[5]—is now used worldwide
[...More...]

"Mahatma Gandhi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Khaddar
Khadi (pronounced [kʰaːd̪iː]; IAST: Khadi) or khaddar is handspun, hand-woven natural fiber cloth from India, Bangladesh and Pakistan mainly made out of cotton.[1].[2][3] The cloth is usually woven from cotton and may also include silk, or wool, which are all spun into yarn on a spinning wheel called a charkha. It is a versatile fabric, cool in summer and warm in winter. In order to improve the look, khādī/khaddar is sometimes starched to give it a stiffer feel. It is widely accepted in fashion circles.[4] Khadi is being promoted in India by Khadi and Village Industries Commission, Ministry of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises of Government of India.Contents1 History 2 India 3 Bangladesh 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
[...More...]

"Khaddar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.