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Rail Freight Transport
Rail freight transport
Rail freight transport
is the use of railroads and trains to transport cargo as opposed to human passengers. A freight train or goods train is a group of freight cars (US) or goods wagons (International Union of Railways) hauled by one or more locomotives on a railway, transporting cargo all or some of the way between the shipper and the intended destination as part of the logistics chain. Trains may haul bulk material, intermodal containers, general freight or specialized freight in purpose-designed cars.[1] Rail freight practices and economics vary by country and region. When considered in terms of ton-miles or tonne-kilometers hauled per unit of energy consumed, rail transport can be more efficient than other means of transportation. Maximum economies are typically realized with bulk commodities (e.g., coal), especially when hauled over long distances
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Freight Train (other)
Freight train may refer to:A freight train, or goods train; the transportation used in Freight rail transportMedia and entertainment[edit]Freight Train (book), children's book by Donald Crews Freight Train (folk song), song by Elizabeth Cotten Freight Train (album),a 2010 album by Alan Jackson Freight Train (Nitro song), song by glam metal band NitroStage and character names[edit]Freight Train, ring name for wrestler Jimmy Jacobs Freight Train, character in TV series Big Time Rush, see List of Big Time Rush characters Levar "Freight Train" Brown, minor character in TV series The Cleveland Show, see List of The Cleveland Show charactersThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Freight train. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Tank Car
A tank car ( International Union of Railways
International Union of Railways
(UIC): tank wagon) is a type of railroad car (UIC: railway car) or rolling stock designed to transport liquid and gaseous commodities.Narrow gauge tank car, 750 mm (2 ft 5 1⁄2 in) gaugeContents1 History1.1 Timeline2 Usage2.1 North America 2.2 Outside North America3 Specialized applications3.1 DOT-111 3.2 DOT-112 3.3 DOT-114 3.4
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Drayage
Drayage
Drayage
is defined as the transport of goods over a short distance in the shipping industry and logistics industry.[1][2] Drayage
Drayage
is often part of a longer overall move, such as from a ship to a warehouse. Some research defines it specifically as "a truck pickup from or delivery to a seaport, border point, inland port, or intermodal terminal with both the trip origin and destination in the same urban area".[3] Port drayage is the term used when describing[4] short hauls from ports and other areas to nearby locations. Drayage
Drayage
is a key aspect of the transfer of shipments to and from other means of transportation. The term drayage is also used for the fee paid for such services. History[edit] The term originally meant "to transport by a sideless cart", or dray. Such carts, pulled by dray horses, were used to move goods short distances, limited by the physical limitations of a dray horse
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Sorting
Sorting
Sorting
is any process of arranging items systematically, and has two common, yet distinct meanings:ordering: arranging items in a sequence ordered by some criterion; categorizing: grouping items with similar properties.Contents1 Sorting
Sorting
information or data1.1 Common sorting algorithms2 Physical sorting processes 3 See also 4 External links Sorting
Sorting
information or data[edit] In computer science, arranging in an ordered sequence is called "sorting"
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Box Car
A boxcar is a North American railroad car that is enclosed and generally used to carry freight. The boxcar, while not the simplest freight car design, is probably the most versatile, since it can carry most loads. Boxcars have side doors of varying size and operation, and some include end doors and adjustable bulkheads to load very large items. Similar covered freight cars outside North America
North America
are covered goods wagons and, depending on the region, are called goods van (UK), louvre van (Australia), covered wagon (UIC and UK) or simply van (UIC and UK).Contents1 Use 2 Dimensions 3 Double-door boxcar 4 Hicube boxcar 5 Passenger use 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksUse[edit]Illustration of a boxcar being unloaded by handBoxcars can carry most kinds of freight. Originally they were hand-loaded, but in more recent years mechanical assistance such as forklifts have been used to load and empty them faster
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Covered Goods Wagon
A covered goods wagon or van is a railway goods wagon which is designed for the transportation of moisture-susceptible goods and therefore fully enclosed by sides and a fixed roof. They are often referred to simply as covered wagons, and this is the term used by the International Union of Railways
International Union of Railways
(UIC). Since the introduction of the international classification for goods wagons by the UIC in the 1960s a distinction has been drawn between ordinary and special covered wagons
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Flat Car
A flatcar (US) (also flat car (US)[1] or flat wagon (UIC)) is a piece of railroad (US) or railway (non-US) rolling stock that consists of an open, flat deck mounted on a pair of trucks (US) or bogies (UK), one at each end containing four or six wheels. Occasionally, flat cars designed to carry extra heavy or extra large loads are mounted on a pair (or rarely, more) of bogeys under each end . The deck of the car can be wood or steel, and the sides of the deck can include pockets for stakes or tie-down points to secure loads. Flatcars designed for carrying machinery have sliding chain assemblies recessed in the deck.[2] Flatcars are used for loads that are too large or cumbersome to load in enclosed cars such as boxcars
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Flat Wagons
A flatcar (US) (also flat car (US)[1] or flat wagon (UIC)) is a piece of railroad (US) or railway (non-US) rolling stock that consists of an open, flat deck mounted on a pair of trucks (US) or bogies (UK), one at each end containing four or six wheels. Occasionally, flat cars designed to carry extra heavy or extra large loads are mounted on a pair (or rarely, more) of bogeys under each end . The deck of the car can be wood or steel, and the sides of the deck can include pockets for stakes or tie-down points to secure loads. Flatcars designed for carrying machinery have sliding chain assemblies recessed in the deck.[2] Flatcars are used for loads that are too large or cumbersome to load in enclosed cars such as boxcars
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Well Car
A well car, also known as a double-stack car or stack car (also well wagon), is a type of railroad car specially designed to carry intermodal containers (shipping containers) used in intermodal freight transport. The "well" is a depressed section which sits close to the rails between the wheel trucks of the car, allowing a container to be carried lower than on a traditional flatcar. This makes it possible to carry a stack of two containers per unit on railway lines (double-stack rail transport) wherever the loading gauge assures sufficient clearance. The top container is secured to the bottom container either by a bulkhead built into the car (e.g., bottom and top containers are the same dimensions of 40 ft.), or through the use of inter-box connectors (IBC)
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Refrigerated Van
A refrigerated van (also called a refrigerated wagon) is a railway goods wagon with cooling equipment. Today they are designated by the International Union of Railways
International Union of Railways
(UIC) as Class I.Contents1 History 2 Construction 3 Use 4 Types 5 References 6 See also 7 External linksHistory[edit] The first wagons were cooled with ice that had been cut in winter from special pools or lakes. It was Gustavus Swift
Gustavus Swift
who succeed in the winter of 1877 for the first time in developing an efficient cooling system for railway wagons for Chicago
Chicago
businesses and meat producers. It circulated air through the ice and then through the entire wagon in order to cool it down. This system was the basis of the success of the Union Stock Yard, the Chicago
Chicago
slaughterhouses
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Mineral
A mineral is a naturally occurring chemical compound,[1] usually of crystalline form and not produced by life processes. A mineral has one specific chemical composition, whereas a rock can be an aggregate of different minerals or mineraloids. The study of minerals is called mineralogy. As of March 2018[update], there are more than 5,500 known mineral species;[2] 5,312 of these have been approved by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA).[3] Minerals are distinguished by various chemical and physical properties. Differences in chemical composition and crystal structure distinguish the various species, which were determined by the mineral's geological environment when formed. Changes in the temperature, pressure, or bulk composition of a rock mass cause changes in its minerals
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Hopper Car
A hopper car (US) or hopper wagon (UIC) is a type of railroad freight car used to transport loose bulk commodities such as coal, ore, grain, and track ballast.[1][2][3] Two main types of hopper car exist: covered hopper cars, which are equipped with a roof, and open hopper cars, which do not have a roof. This type of car is distinguished from a gondola car in that it has opening doors on the underside or on the sides to discharge its cargo. The development of the hopper car went along with the development of automated handling of such commodities, with automated loading and unloading facilities. Covered hopper
Covered hopper
cars are used for bulk cargo such as grain, sugar, and fertilizer that must be protected from exposure to the weather. Open hopper cars are used for commodities such as coal, which can suffer exposure with less detrimental effect
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British Rail Class 92
The British Rail
British Rail
Class 92 is a dual-voltage electric locomotive which can run on 25 kV AC
25 kV AC
from overhead wires or 750 V DC from a third rail. It was designed specifically to operate services through the Channel Tunnel between Britain and France. Eurotunnel
Eurotunnel
indicates the Class 92 locomotive as the reference for other locomotives which railway undertakings might want to get certified for usage in the Channel tunnel. Locomotives of this type are operated by GB Railfreight/Europorte 2 and DB Cargo
DB Cargo
UK. In France, a number were also owned and operated by SNCF; these were classified as CC 92000 on French railways. The class 92 was intended as a mixed traffic locomotive for hauling both international freight trains and the ill-fated and never introduced Nightstar passenger sleeper trains though the Channel Tunnel
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Gondola (rail)
In US railroad terminology, a gondola is an open-topped rail vehicle used for transporting loose bulk materials. Because of their low side walls gondolas are also suitable for the carriage of such high-density cargos as steel plates or coils, or of bulky items such as prefabricated sections of rail track.Contents1 History 2 Specialized car types2.1 Lorry or mine car2.1.1 Chaldrons2.2 "Bathtub" gondolas 2.3 Track ballast
Track ballast
gondolas3 Sources 4 Naming 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Before the opening of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal in Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia), considerable amounts of coal were carried via the Potomac River. Since timber was an abundant resource, flat boats, called "gondolas" (a spoof on Venetian rowing boats), were constructed to navigate the "black diamonds" down river to markets around Washington, DC
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Open Wagon
Open wagons form a large group of railway goods wagons designed primarily for the transportation of bulk goods that are not moisture-retentive and can usually be tipped, dumped or shovelled. The International Union of Railways
International Union of Railways
(UIC) distinguishes between ordinary wagons (Class E/UIC-type 5) and special wagons (F/6)
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