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Raikva
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Asteya
Asteya
Asteya
is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
term for "non-stealing". It is a virtue in Jainism
Jainism
and Hinduism
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Ārjava
Ārjava (Sanskrit: आर्जव) literally means sincerity, straightness and non-hypocrisy.[1][2] It is one of the ten Yamas
Yamas
in ancient Hindu and Jaina texts.[3]Contents1 Definition 2 Literature 3 See also 4 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Ārjava means straightness, sincerity and harmony in one’s thought, words and actions towards oneself and towards others.[1] Kane translates arjava as straightforwardness.[4] It is explained in ancient Indian texts as “self-restraint from hypocrisy", and "the absence of hypocrisy”. It is included as one of several ethical virtuous restraints in an individual's path to spirituality
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Puranic Chronology
The Puranic chronology
Puranic chronology
gives a timeline of Hindu
Hindu
history according to the Hindu
Hindu
scriptures
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Kama
Kama
Kama
(/ˈkɑːmə/; Sanskrit, Pali; Devanagari: काम, IAST: kāma) means wish, desire or longing in Hindu literature.[3] Kama often connotes sexual desire and longing in contemporary literature, but the concept more broadly refers to any desire, wish, passion, longing, pleasure of the senses, the aesthetic enjoyment of life, affection, or love, with or without sexual connotations.[4][5] Kama
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Tapas (Sanskrit)
Tapas is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word that means "to heat".[2] It also connotes certain spiritual practices in Indian religions
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God In Hinduism
The concept of God
God
in Hinduism
Hinduism
varies in its diverse traditions.[1][2][3] Hinduism
Hinduism
spans a wide range of beliefs such as henotheism, monotheism, polytheism, panentheism, pantheism, pandeism, monism, atheism and nontheism.[1][4][5] Forms of theism find mention in the Bhagavad Gita
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Hinduism
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Dāna
Dāna
Dāna
(Devanagari: दान) is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Pali
Pali
word that connotes the virtue of generosity, charity or giving of alms in Indian philosophies.[1][2] It is alternatively transliterated as daana.[3][4] In Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism
Jainism
and Sikhism, dāna is the practice of cultivating generosity
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Aparigraha
In Hinduism
Hinduism
and Jainism, aparigraha (Sanskrit: अपरिग्रह) is the virtue of non-possessiveness, non-grasping or non-greediness.[1] Aparigrah is the opposite of parigrah, and refers to keeping the desire for possessions to what is necessary or important, depending on one's life stage and context
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Santosha
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Svādhyāya
Svādhyāya
Svādhyāya
(Devanagari: स्वाध्याय) is a Sanskrit term which literally means "one's own reading" and "self-study".[1][2] It is also a broader concept with several meanings. In various schools of Hinduism, Svadhyaya is a Niyama
Niyama
(virtuous observance) connoting introspection and "study of self".[3] The term also means the self-study and recitation of the Vedas
Vedas
and other sacred books.[4][5][6]Contents1 Etymology, meaning and usage 2 Svadhyaya in ancient literature2.1 Upanishads 2.2 Other scriptures3 Svadhyaya as a historical practice3.1 Exceptions4 Svadhyaya as a Niyama 5 Notes 6 ReferencesEtymology, meaning and usage[edit] Svādhyāya
Svādhyāya
is a compound Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word composed of svā (स्वा) + adhyāya (अध्याय)
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Shaucha
Shaucha
Shaucha
(Sanskrit: शौच, also spelled Saucha, Śauca) literally means purity, cleanliness and clearness.[1] It refers to purity of mind, speech and body.[2] Saucha is one of the Niyamas
Niyamas
of Yoga.[3] It is discussed in many ancient Indian texts such as the Mahabharata
Mahabharata
and Patanjali's Yoga
Yoga
Sutras. It is a virtue in Hinduism
Hinduism
and Jainism.[4][5] Saucha includes outer purity of body as well as inner purity of mind.[6][7][8] The concept of Saucha is synonymous with Shuddhi (शुद्धि).[9] LePage states that Saucha in yoga is on many levels, and deepens as an understanding and evolution of self increases.[10] Shaucha, or holistic purity of the body, is considered essential for health, happiness and general well-being
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Mitahara
Mitahara
Mitahara
(Sanskrit: मिताहार, Mitāhāra) literally means the habit of moderate food.[1] Mitahara
Mitahara
is also a concept in Indian philosophy, particularly Yoga, that integrates awareness about food, drink, balanced diet and consumption habits and its effect on one’s body and mind.[2] It is one of the ten yamas in ancient Indian texts.[3]Contents1 Definition 2 Literature2.1 The virtue of mitahara 2.2 Dietectics and mitahara3 Related concepts 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Mitahara
Mitahara
is a Sanskrit combination word, from Mita (मित, moderate)[4] and Ahara (आहार, taking food, diet),[5] which together mean moderate diet.[6][7] In Yoga
Yoga
and other ancient texts, it represents a concept linking nutrition to the health of one’s body and mind
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Jnana Yoga
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Bhakti Yoga
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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