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Rafael Sabatini
Rafael Sabatini
Rafael Sabatini
(29 April 1875 – 13 February 1950) was an Italian-English writer of romance and adventure novels.[1] He is best known for his worldwide bestsellers: The Sea Hawk
The Sea Hawk
(1915), Scaramouche (1921), Captain Blood (a.k.a. The Odyssey of Captain Blood) (1922), and Bellarion the Fortunate (1926). In all, Sabatini produced 31 novels, eight short story collections, six non-fiction books, numerous uncollected short stories, and several plays.Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 Works3.1 Series3.1.1 Scaramouche 3.1.2 Captain Blood3.2 Novels 3.3 Collections3.3.1 Posthumous collections3.4 Plays 3.5 Anthologies edited 3.6 Nonfiction4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Rafael Sabatini
Rafael Sabatini
was born in Iesi, Italy, to an English mother (Anna Trafford) and Italian father (Vincenso Sabatini)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Commedia Dell'Arte
Commedia dell'arte
Commedia dell'arte
(Italian pronunciation: [komˈmɛːdja delˈlarte], comedy of the profession[1]) was an early form of professional theatre, originating from Italy, that was popular in Europe from the 16th through the 18th century.[2][3][4] Commedia dell'arte also is known as commedia alla maschera, commedia improvviso, and commedia dell'arte all'improvviso.[5] Commedia is a form of theatre characterized by masked "types" which began in Italy in the 16th century and was responsible for the advent of actresses (Isabella Andreini[6]) and improvised performances based on sketches or scenarios.[7][8] A commedia, such as The Tooth Puller, is both scripted and improvised.[7][9] Characters' entrances and exits are scripted. A special characteristic of commedia dell'arte are the lazzi
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Hay-on-Wye
Hay-on-Wye
Hay-on-Wye
(Welsh: Y Gelli Gandryll or just Y Gelli), often abbreviated to just "Hay", is a small market town and community in the historic county of Brecknockshire
Brecknockshire
in Wales, currently administered as part of the unitary authority of Powys.[2] With over twenty bookshops, it is often described as "the town of books", and is both the National Book Town of Wales
Wales
and the site of the annual Hay Literary Festival. The settlement's name is first referred to between 1135 and 1147 as "Haya"; in 1299 the name of "La Haye" is used. By the 16th century it was simply called "Hay", and the use of the river as a suffix is a later addition. In 1215, a Welsh name, "Gelli" was recorded, and "Gelli gandrell" in 1614; the two names may have been used concurrently in 1625
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Clifford, Herefordshire
Clifford is a village and civil parish in Herefordshire, England, four miles to the north of Hay-on-Wye. It lies on the south bank of the River Wye, which here forms the border between Wales and England. Through the village runs the B4350 which is the main road. The civil parish also includes the hamlets of Priory Wood and Hardwicke. There has been a fluctuation in population, the graph shows that the population was higher in the 2001 census, stating there was a population of 530[2] Newton Tump is the remains of a motte and bailey castle 3 miles southeast of the village.[3] In the 1870s, Clifford was described as:"The village stands on the river Wye, adjacent to the Hereford and Brecon railway, 2 miles NNE of Hay; and has a post office under Hereford. The parish includes also part of Vowmine township. Acres, 6, 522. Real property, £6, 209. Pop., 895. Houses, 207. A castle was built here by W
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Maureen O'Hara
Maureen O'Hara
Maureen O'Hara
(born Maureen FitzSimons; 17 August 1920 – 24 October 2015) was an Irish actress and singer. The famously red-headed O'Hara was known for playing fiercely passionate but sensible heroines, often in westerns and adventure films. She worked on numerous occasions with director John Ford
John Ford
and longtime friend John Wayne, and was one of the last surviving stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood. O'Hara grew up at Beechwood Avenue Upper in the Dublin suburb of Ranelagh[1] in a Catholic family,[2] and aspired to become an actress from a very young age. She trained with the Rathmines
Rathmines
Theatre Company from the age of 10 and at the Abbey Theatre
Abbey Theatre
from the age of 14
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Tyrone Power
Tyrone Edmund Power III[1][2] (May 5, 1914 – November 15, 1958) was an American film, stage and radio actor. From the 1930s to the 1950s Power appeared in dozens of films, often in swashbuckler roles or romantic leads. His better-known films include The Mark of Zorro, Blood and Sand, The Black Swan, Prince of Foxes, Witness For The Prosecution, The Black Rose, and Captain from Castile. Power's own favorite film among those that he starred in was Nightmare Alley.[3] Though largely a matinee idol in the 1930s and early 1940s and known for his striking looks, Power starred in films in a number of genres, from drama to light comedy. In the 1950s he began placing limits on the number of films he would make in order to devote more time for theater productions. He received his biggest accolades as a stage actor in John Brown's Body and Mister Roberts
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Piracy
Piracy
Piracy
is an act of robbery or criminal violence by ship or boat-borne attackers upon another ship or a coastal area, typically with the goal of stealing cargo and other valuable items or properties. Those who engage in acts of piracy are called pirates. The earliest documented instances of piracy were in the 14th century BC, when the Sea Peoples, a group of ocean raiders, attacked the ships of the Aegean and Mediterranean
Mediterranean
civilizations. Narrow channels which funnel shipping into predictable routes have long created opportunities for piracy,[1] as well as for privateering and commerce raiding
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
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J. Warren Kerrigan
George Jack Warren Kerrigan (July 25, 1879 – June 9, 1947) was an American silent film actor and film director.[1]Contents1 Early life and career 2 Controversy 3 Revival 4 Personal life and death4.1 James Carroll Vincent5 Selected filmography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Born in New Albany, Indiana,[2] Kerrigan worked as a warehouse clerk in his teens until a chance arrived to appear in a vaudeville production. He continued to act in traveling stock productions, though he took a brief time away from the stage to attend the University of Illinois. By the time he was 30 years old, he had begun to make appearances in films for Essanay Studios. A contract with the American Film Corporation opened the door to leading roles, often as a modern man of the age
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Barbary Coast
The Barbary Coast, or Berber Coast, was the term used by Europeans from the 16th until the 19th century to refer to much of the collective land of the Berber people. Today, the term Greater Tamazgha or simply "Tamazgha" ("Greater Maghreb") corresponds roughly to "Barbary". The term Barbary Coast
Barbary Coast
emphasizes the Berber coastal regions and cities throughout the middle and western coastal regions of North Africa
Africa
– what is now modern nations of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya. The English term "Barbary" (and its European varieties: Barbaria, Berbérie, etc.) referred mainly to the entire Berber lands including non-coastal regions, deep into the African continent, as seen in European geographical and political maps published during the 17th–20th centuries.[1] The name is derived from the Berber people
Berber people
of North Africa
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Milton Sills
Milton George Gustavus Sills (January 12, 1882 – September 15, 1930) was an American stage and film actor of the early twentieth century.Contents1 Biography 2 Motion pictures 3 Death and legacy 4 Selected filmography 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Sills was born in Chicago, Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
into a wealthy family. He was the son of William Henry Sills, a successful mineral dealer, and Josephine Antoinette Troost Sills, an heiress from a prosperous banking family. Upon completing high school, Sills was offered a one-year scholarship to the University of Chicago, where he studied psychology and philosophy
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Frank Lloyd
Frank William George Lloyd (2 February 1886 – 10 August 1960) was a British film director, scriptwriter and producer. He was among the founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences,[2] and was its president from 1934-35. Lloyd was born in Glasgow, Scotland. His mother Jane was Scottish and his father Edmund was Welsh.[1] He is Scotland's first Academy Award winner and is unique in film history, having received three Oscar nominations in 1929 for his work on a silent film (The Divine Lady), a part-talkie (Weary River) and a full talkie (Drag). He won for The Divine Lady
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Ramón Novarro
Jose Ramón Gil Samaniego, best known as Ramón Novarro (February 6, 1899 – October 30, 1968), was a Mexican film, stage and television actor who began his career in silent films in 1917 and eventually became a leading man and one of the top box office attractions of the 1920s and early 1930s. Novarro was promoted by MGM as a "Latin lover" and became known as a sex symbol after the death of Rudolph Valentino.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Silent films 2.2 Talking films3 Personal life 4 Murder 5 In popular culture 6 Filmography 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksEarly life[edit]Ramon Novarro by HurrellNovarro was born José Ramón Gil Samaniego on February 6, 1899 in Durango City, Durango, Mexico, to Dr. Mariano N
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Henry Hamilton (playwright)
Henry Hamilton (c. 1854 – 4 September 1918) was an English playwright, lyricist, and critic. He is best remembered for his musical theatre pieces, including The Duchess of Dantzic (1903), Veronique (1905) and The Little Michus (1907), often adapting foreign works for the British stage. He began as a an actor but turned to writing plays in 1883 and was especially successful in the first decade of the 20th century. He was also the author of the popular song "Private Tommy Atkins" (1893). Away from his professional life, Hamilton studied theosophy.Contents1 Life and career 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Hamilton was born at Nunhead, Surrey to James Hamilton and Janette (nee Ferguson) and baptised 14 March 1855 at St Mary Magdalen, Peckham, Surrey.[1] His father is described as a gentleman, a merchant and, in his death announcement, formerly of the Hon. East Indian Civil Service
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Rex Ingram (director)
Rex Ingram (15 January 1892 – 21 July 1950) was an Irish film director, producer, writer and actor.[1] Director Erich von Stroheim once called him "the world's greatest director."[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Conversion to Islam3 Death 4 Legacy 5 Filmography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Born Reginald Ingram Montgomery Hitchcock in Dublin, Ireland, he was educated at Saint Columba's College, near Rathfarnham, County Dublin. He spent much of his adolescence living in the Old Rectory, Kinnitty, Birr, County Offaly where his father was the Church of Ireland
Church of Ireland
rector. He emigrated to the Unit
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