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Radzyń Chełmiński
Radzyń Chełmiński
Radzyń Chełmiński
(Polish pronunciation: [ˈrad͡zɨɲ xɛu̯ˈmʲiɲskʲi]; German: Rehden) is a town in Grudziądz County, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland, with 1,946 inhabitants (2004). The town contains the ruins of a medieval Ordensburg
Ordensburg
castle built by the Teutonic Knights. Points of interest[edit]Radzyń Castle ruins.Parish church of St. Ann
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Poland
Coordinates: 52°N 20°E / 52°N 20°E / 52; 20 Republic
Republic
of Poland Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska  (
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger
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Voivodeships Of Poland
A województwo ([vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ]; plural: województwa) is the highest-level administrative subdivision of Poland, corresponding to a "province" in many other countries. The term "województwo" has been in use since the 14th century, and is commonly translated in English as "province".[1] Województwo is also rendered in English by "voivodeship" (/ˈvɔɪvoʊdʃɪp/) or a variant spelling.[2] The Polish local government reforms
Polish local government reforms
adopted in 1998, which went into effect on 1 January 1999, created sixteen new voivodeships. These replaced the 49 former voivodeships that had existed from 1 July 1975, and bear greater resemblance (in territory but not in name) to the voivodeships that existed between 1950 and 1975. Today's voivodeships are mostly named after historical and geographical regions, while those prior to 1998 generally took their names from the cities on which they were centered
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Teutonic Knights
The Order of Brothers of the German House of Saint Mary in Jerusalem[2] (official names: Latin: Ordo domus Sanctæ Mariæ Theutonicorum Hierosolymitanorum, German: Orden der Brüder vom Deutschen Haus der Heiligen Maria in Jerusalem), commonly the Teutonic Order (Deutscher Orden, Deutschherrenorden or Deutschritterorden), is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
founded as a military order c. 1190 in Acre, Kingdom of Jerusalem. The Teutonic Order
Teutonic Order
was formed to aid Christians
Christians
on their pilgrimages to the Holy Land
Holy Land
and to establish hospitals
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Gmina
The gmina (Polish pronunciation [ˈɡmina], plural gminy [ˈɡminɨ]) is the principal unit of the administrative division of Poland, similar to a commune or municipality. As of 2010 there were 2,478 gminy throughout the country.[1] The word gmina derives from the German word Gemeinde, meaning "community". The gmina has been the basic unit of territorial division in Poland since 1974, when it replaced the smaller gromada (cluster). There are three types of gminy:urban gmina (Polish: gmina miejska) consisting of just one city or town, mixed urban-rural gmina (Polish: gmina miejsko-wiejska) consisting of a town and surrounding villages and countryside; and rural gmina (Polish: gmina wiejska) consisting only of villages and countryside (occasionally of just one village).Some rural gminy have their seat in a town which is outside the gmina's division
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Powiat
A powiat (pronounced [ˈpɔvʲat]; Polish plural: powiaty) is the second-level unit of local government and administration in Poland, equivalent to a county, district or prefecture (LAU-1, formerly NUTS-4) in other countries. The term "powiat" is most often translated into English as "county" or "district". A powiat is part of a larger unit, the voivodeship (Polish województwo) or province. A powiat is usually subdivided into gminas (in English, often referred to as "communes" or "municipalities"). Major towns and cities, however, function as separate counties in their own right, without subdivision into gminas. They are termed "city counties" (powiaty grodzkie or, more formally, miasta na prawach powiatu) and have roughly the same status as former county boroughs in the UK. The other type of powiats are termed "land counties" (powiaty ziemskie). As of 2008, there were 379 powiat-level entities: 314 land counties, and 65 city counties
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Ordensburg
Ordensburgs (plural in German: Ordensburgen, literally: castles of orders) were fortresses built by crusading German military orders during the Middle Ages. The term "Ordensburgen" was also used during Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
to refer to training schools for Nazi leaders.Contents1 Medieval Ordensburgs1.1 List of medieval Ordensburgs2 See also 3 ReferencesMedieval Ordensburgs[edit] The Ordensburgs were originally constructed by the Livonian Brothers of the Sword and later the Teutonic Knights
Teutonic Knights
to fortify territory in Prussia
Prussia
and Livonia
Livonia
against the pagan aboriginals. Later, Ordensburgs were used to defend against Poland
Poland
and Lithuania. The Ordensburgs often resembled cloisters. While they were considerably larger than those in the Holy Roman Empire, they were much scarcer in the Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights
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Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship
Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, also known as Cuiavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship or simply Kujawsko-Pomorskie,[1] or Kujawy-Pomerania Province[2] (in Polish, województwo kujawsko-pomorskie [vɔjɛˈvut͡stfɔ kuˈjafskɔ pɔˈmɔrskʲɛ]), is one of the 16 voivodeships (provinces) into which Poland
Poland
is now divided. It is situated in mid-northern Poland, on the boundary between the two historic regions from which it takes its name: Kuyavia
Kuyavia
(Polish: Kujawy) and Pomerania
Pomerania
(Polish: Pomorze)
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Grudziądz County
Grudziądz
Grudziądz
County (Polish: powiat grudziądzki) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, north-central Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat is the city of Grudziądz, although the city is not part of the county (it constitutes a separate city county). The only towns in Grudziądz County are Łasin, which lies 21 km (13 mi) east of Grudziądz, and Radzyń Chełmiński, 16 km (10 mi) south-east of Grudziądz. The county covers an area of 728.39 square kilometres (281.2 sq mi)
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Radzyń-Wybudowanie
Radzyń-Wybudowanie [ˈrad͡zɨɲ vɨbudɔˈvaɲe] is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Radzyń Chełmiński, within Grudziądz County, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, in north-central Poland.[1] References[edit]^ "Central Statistical Office (GUS) – TERYT (National Register of Territorial Land Apportionment Journal)" (in Polish). 2008-06-01. v t eGmina Radzyń ChełmińskiTown and seatRadzyń ChełmińskiVillagesCzeczewo Dębieniec Gawłowice Gołębiewo Gziki Kneblowo Mazanki Nowy Dwór Radzyń-Wieś Radzyń-Wybudowanie Rozental Rywałd Stara Ruda Szumiłowo Wymysłowo Zakrzewo ZielnowoCoordinates: 53°21′38″N 18°56′05″E / 53.36056°N 18.93472°E / 53.36056; 18.93472This Grudziądz County location article is a stub
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Stara Ruda, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship
Stara Ruda [ˈstara ˈruda] is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Radzyń Chełmiński, within Grudziądz County, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, in north-central Poland.[1] References[edit]^ "Central Statistical Office (GUS) – TERYT (National Register of Territorial Land Apportionment Journal)" (in Polish). 2008-06-01. v t eGmina Radzyń ChełmińskiTown and seatRadzyń ChełmińskiVillagesCzeczewo Dębieniec Gawłowice Gołębiewo Gziki Kneblowo Mazanki Nowy Dwór Radzyń-Wieś Radzyń-Wybudowanie Rozental Rywałd Stara Ruda Szumiłowo Wymysłowo Zakrzewo ZielnowoCoordinates: 53°23′43″N 19°01′27″E / 53.39528°N 19.02417°E / 53.39528; 19.02417This Grudziądz County location article is a stub
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Dębieniec
Dębieniec [dɛmˈbjɛɲɛt͡s] is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Radzyń Chełmiński, within Grudziądz County, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, in north-central Poland.[1] References[edit]^ "Central Statistical Office (GUS) - TERYT (National Register of Territorial Land Apportionment Journal)" (in Polish). 2008-06-01. v t eGmina Radzyń ChełmińskiTown and seatRadzyń ChełmińskiVillagesCzeczewo Dębieniec Gawłowice Gołębiewo Gziki Kneblowo Mazanki Nowy Dwór Radzyń-Wieś Radzyń-Wybudowanie Rozental Rywałd Stara Ruda Szumiłowo Wymysłowo Zakrzewo ZielnowoCoordinates: 53°23′00″N 18°50′00″E / 53.3833°N 18.8333°E / 53.3833; 18.8333This Grudziądz County location article is a stub
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