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Radiotelephony Procedure
Radiotelephony procedure (also on-air protocol and voice procedure) includes various techniques used to clarify, simplify and standardize spoken communications over two-way radios, in use by the armed forces, in civil aviation, police and fire dispatching systems, citizens' band radio (CB), and Amateur radio. Voice procedure communications are intended to maximize clarity of spoken communication and reduce errors in the verbal message by use of an accepted nomenclature. It consists of a signalling protocol such as the use of abbreviated codes like the CB radio ten-code, Q codes in amateur radio and aviation, police codes, etc. and jargon. Some elements of voice procedure are understood across many applications, but significant variations exist
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Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet
The Allied military radiotelephone spelling alphabets were created beginning prior to World War I
World War I
and evolved separately in the United States and Great Britain (and separately among each countries' separate military services), until being merged during World War II. The last WWII spelling alphabet continued to be used through the Korean War, being replaced in 1956 as a result of both countries adopting the ICAO/ITU Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet, with the Allied nations calling their usage the "NATO Phonetic Alphabet". Sometime during WWII, the Allies had defined terminology to describe the scope of communications procedures among different services and nations
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National Telecommunications And Information Administration
The National Telecommunications
Telecommunications
and Information Administration (NTIA) is an agency of the United States
United States
Department of Commerce that
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International Code Of Signals
The International Code of Signals
International Code of Signals
(ICS) is an international system of signals and codes for use by vessels to communicate important messages regarding safety of navigation and related matters. Signals can be sent by flaghoist, signal lamp ("blinker"), flag semaphore, radiotelegraphy, and radiotelephony
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Safety Of Life A Sea Convention
The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) is an international maritime treaty which sets minimum safety standards in the construction, equipment and operation of merchant ships. The convention requires signatory flag states to ensure that ships flagged by them comply with at least these standards
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Civil Aviation
Civil aviation
Civil aviation
is one of two major categories of flying, representing all non-military aviation, both private and commercial. Most of the countries in the world are members of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and work together to establish common standards and recommended practices for civil aviation through that agency. Civil aviation
Civil aviation
includes two major categories:Scheduled air transport, including all passenger and cargo flights operating on regularly scheduled routes; and General aviation
General aviation
(GA), including all other civil flights, private or commercialAlthough scheduled air transport is the larger operation in terms of passenger numbers, GA is larger in the number of flights (and flight hours, in the U.S.[1]) In the U.S., GA carries 166 million passengers each year,[2] more than any individual airline, though less than all the airlines combined
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Title 47 CFR Part 97
In the U.S., Part 97 is the section of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules and regulations that pertains to amateur radio and the conduct of amateur radio operators. It is a part of Title 47 of the Code of Federal Regulations
Code of Federal Regulations
(CFR).Contents1 Subparts1.1 A. General Provisions 1.2 B. Station Operating Standards 1.3 C. Special
Special
Operations 1.4 D. Technical Standards 1.5 E. Emergency Communications 1.6 F. Qualifying Examination Systems 1.7 Appendices2 See also 3 References 4 External linksSubparts[edit] Part 97 consists of six subparts (A through F) and two appendices. A
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ITU Prefix
The International Telecommunication Union
International Telecommunication Union
(ITU) allocates call sign prefixes for radio and television stations of all types. They also form the basis for, but do not exactly match, aircraft registration identifiers. These prefixes are agreed upon internationally, and are a form of country code. A call sign can be any number of letters and numerals but each country must only use call signs that begin with the characters allocated for use in that country. A few countries do not fully comply with these rules. Australian broadcast stations officially have—but do not use—the VL prefix, and Canada
Canada
uses Chile's CB for its own Canadian Broadcasting Corporation stations
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General Aviation
General aviation
General aviation
(GA) are all civil aviation operations other than scheduled air services and non-scheduled air transport operations for remuneration or hire.[1] General aviation
General aviation
flights range from gliders and powered parachutes to corporate business jet flights
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Call Signs In The United States
Call signs
Call signs
in the United States are identifiers assigned to radio and television stations, which are issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). They consist of from 3 to 9 letters and digits, with their composition determined by a station's service category
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Federal Communications Commission
The Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) is an independent agency of the United States government created by statute (47 U.S.C. § 151 and 47 U.S.C. § 154) to regulate interstate communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable. The FCC
FCC
works towards six goals in the areas of broadband, competition, the spectrum, the media, public safety and homeland security, and modernizing itself.[4] The FCC
FCC
was formed by the Communications Act of 1934
Communications Act of 1934
to replace the radio regulation functions of the Federal Radio Commission. The FCC took over wire communication regulation from the Interstate Commerce Commission. The FCC's mandated jurisdiction covers the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the Territories of the United States
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SOS
SOS
SOS
is the International Morse code
Morse code
distress signal (▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄▄); the bar over it indicates to omit the normal gaps between the letters. This distress signal was first adopted by the German government radio regulations effective 1 April 1905, and became the worldwide standard under the second International Radiotelegraphic Convention, which was signed on 3 November 1906, and became effective on 1 July 1908. SOS
SOS
remained the maritime radio distress signal until 1999, when it was replaced by the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System.[1] SOS
SOS
is still recognized as a visual distress signal.[2] The SOS
SOS
distress signal is a continuous sequence of three dots, three dashes, and three dots, with no spaces between the letters (notated by the overbar)
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Amateur Radio Licensing In The United States
In the United States, amateur radio licensing is governed by the Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) under strict federal regulations. Licenses to operate amateur stations for personal use are granted to individuals of any age once they demonstrate an understanding of both pertinent FCC regulations and knowledge of radio station operation and safety considerations. Applicants as young as five years old have passed examinations and were granted licenses.[1][2] December 2012 marked one hundred years of amateur radio operator and station licensing by the United States
United States
government. Operator licenses are divided into different classes, each of which corresponds to an increasing degree of knowledge and corresponding privileges
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Maritime Call Sign
Maritime call signs
Maritime call signs
are call signs assigned as unique identifiers to ships and boats. One of the earliest applications of radiotelegraph operation, long predating broadcast radio, were marine radio stations installed aboard ships at sea. In the absence of international standards, early transmitters constructed after Guglielmo Marconi's first trans-Atlantic message in 1901 were issued arbitrary two-letter calls by radio companies, alone or later preceded by a one-letter company identifier. These mimicked an earlier railroad telegraph convention where short, two-letter identifiers served as Morse code abbreviations to denote the various individual stations on the line (for instance, AX could represent Halifax)
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Maritime Mobile Service Identity
A Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI) is a series of nine digits which are sent in digital form over a radio frequency channel in order to uniquely identify ship stations, ship earth stations, coast stations, coast earth stations, and group calls
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Mnemonic
A mnemonic (/nəˈmɒnɪk/,[1] the first "m" is silent) device, or memory device, is any learning technique that aids information retention or retrieval (remembering) in the human memory. Mnemonics make use of elaborative encoding, retrieval cues, and imagery as specific tools to encode any given information in a way that allows for efficient storage and retrieval. Mnemonics aid original information in becoming associated with something more accessible or meaningful—which, in turn, provides better retention of the information. Commonly encountered mnemonics are often used for lists and in auditory form, such as short poems, acronyms, or memorable phrases, but mnemonics can also be used for other types of information and in visual or kinesthetic forms
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