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Radionucleotide
RADIONUCLEOTIDE may refer to: * In experimental biochemistry, a nucleotide that is radiolabeled with a radionuclide such as phosphorus-32 * When used in clinical medical literature, usually a malapropism for the intended term radionuclide This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title RADIONUCLEOTIDE. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intende
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Nucleotide
NUCLEOTIDES are organic molecules that serve as the monomer units for forming the nucleic acid polymers deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), both of which are essential biomolecules in all life-forms on Earth. Nucleotides are the building blocks of nucleic acids; they are composed of three subunit molecules: a nitrogenous base , a five-carbon sugar (ribose or deoxyribose ), and at least one phosphate group . They are also known as phosphate nucleotides. A nucleoside is a nitrogenous base and a 5-carbon sugar. Thus a nucleoside plus a phosphate group yields a nucleotide. Nucleotides also play a central role in life-form metabolism at the fundamental, cellular level
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Malapropism
A MALAPROPISM (also called a MALAPROP or DOGBERRYISM) is the use of an incorrect word in place of a word with a similar sound, resulting in a nonsensical, sometimes humorous utterance . An example is the statement by baseball player Yogi Berra , " Texas
Texas
has a lot of electrical votes", rather than "electoral votes ". Malapropisms often occur as errors in natural speech and are sometimes the subject of media attention, especially when made by politicians or other prominent individuals. Philosopher Donald Davidson has noted that malapropisms show the complex process through which the brain translates thoughts into language. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Distinguishing features * 3 Examples from fiction * 4 Real-life examples * 5 Philosophical implications * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 Further reading * 9 External links ETYMOLOGYThe word "malapropism" (and its earlier variant "malaprop") comes from a character named "Mrs
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Phosphorus-32
PHOSPHORUS-32 is a radioactive isotope of phosphorus . The nucleus of phosphorus-32 contains 15 protons and 17 neutrons , one more neutron than the most common isotope of phosphorus, phosphorus-31. Phosphorus-32 only exists in small quantities on Earth
Earth
as it has a short half-life of 14.29 days and so decays rapidly. Phosphorus
Phosphorus
is found in many organic molecules and so phosphorus-32 has many applications in medicine , biochemistry and molecular biology where it can be used to trace phosphorylated molecules, e.g. in elucidating metabolic pathways , and radioactively label DNA
DNA

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Radioactive Tracer
A RADIOACTIVE TRACER, or RADIOACTIVE LABEL, is a chemical compound in which one or more atoms have been replaced by a radioisotope so by virtue of its radioactive decay it can be used to explore the mechanism of chemical reactions by tracing the path that the radioisotope follows from reactants to products. RADIOLABELING is thus the radioactive form of isotopic labeling . Radioisotopes of hydrogen , carbon , phosphorus , sulphur , and iodine have been used extensively to trace the path of biochemical reactions . A radioactive tracer can also be used to track the distribution of a substance within a natural system such as a cell or tissue , or as a flow tracer to track fluid flow . Radioactive tracers are also used to determine the location of fractures created by hydraulic fracturing in natural gas production. Radioactive tracers form the basis of a variety of imaging systems, such as, PET scans , SPECT
SPECT
scans and technetium scans
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Radionuclide
A RADIONUCLIDE (RADIOACTIVE NUCLIDE, RADIOISOTOPE or RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPE) is an atom that has excess nuclear energy, making it unstable. This excess energy can be either emitted from the nucleus as gamma radiation , or create and emit from the nucleus a new particle (alpha particle or beta particle ), or transfer this excess energy to one of its electrons , causing that electron to be ejected as a conversion electron . During those processes, the radionuclide is said to undergo radioactive decay . These emissions constitute ionizing radiation . The unstable nucleus is more stable following the emission, but will sometimes undergo further decay. Radioactive decay is a random process at the level of single atoms: it is impossible to predict when one particular atom will decay. However, for a collection of atoms of a single element the decay rate, and thus the half-life (t1/2) for that collection can be calculated from their measured decay constants
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Radionucleotide
RADIONUCLEOTIDE may refer to: * In experimental biochemistry, a nucleotide that is radiolabeled with a radionuclide such as phosphorus-32 * When used in clinical medical literature, usually a malapropism for the intended term radionuclide This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title RADIONUCLEOTIDE. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intende
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