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RFC 822
Electronic Mail
Mail
(email or e-mail) is a method of exchanging messages ("mail") between people using electronic devices. Email
Email
first entered limited use in the 1960s and by the mid-1970s had taken the form now recognized as email. Email
Email
operates across computer networks, which today is primarily the Internet. Some early email systems required the author and the recipient to both be online at the same time, in common with instant messaging. Today's email systems are based on a store-and-forward model. Email
Email
servers accept, forward, deliver, and store messages
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Email Limited
Email
Email
Limited was a manufacturing conglomerate operating mainly in Australia. The company was formed from the merger of Electricity Meter Manufacturing Co Pty Ltd, established in 1912, and New System Telephones Pty Ltd, established in 1920. The company was incorporated in New South Wales
New South Wales
on 30 November 1934 as Electricity Meter & Allied Industries Ltd; it adopted the Email
Email
name (an acronym) on 20 October 1951. Email's original and longest running business is the manufacturing of electric, gas and water meters
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E-mail Client
In Internet, an email client, email reader or more formally mail user agent (MUA) is a computer program in the category of groupware environments used to access and manage a user's email. Client is meant to be a role. For example, a web application which provides message management, composition, and reception functions may internally act as an email client; as a whole, it is commonly referred to as webmail
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History Of Email
The history of email extends over more than 50 years, entailing an evolving set of technologies and standards that culminated in the email systems we use today. Computer-based mail and messaging became possible with the advent of time-sharing computers in the early 1960s, and informal methods of using shared files to pass messages were soon expanded into the first mail systems. Most developers of early mainframes and minicomputers developed similar, but generally incompatible, mail applications. Over time, a complex web of gateways and routing systems linked many of them. Many US universities were part of the ARPANET, which aimed at software portability between its systems
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Computer
A computer is a device that can be instructed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations automatically. Modern computers have the ability to follow generalized sets of operations, called programs. These programs enable computers to perform an extremely wide range of tasks. Computers are used as control systems for a wide variety of industrial and consumer devices. This includes simple special purpose devices like microwave ovens and remote controls, factory devices such as industrial robots and computer assisted design, and also general purpose devices like personal computers and mobile devices such as smartphones. Early computers were only conceived as calculating devices. Since ancient times, simple manual devices like the abacus aided people in doing calculations. Early in the Industrial Revolution, some mechanical devices were built to automate long tedious tasks, such as guiding patterns for looms
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Time-sharing
In computing, time-sharing is the sharing of a computing resource among many users by means of multiprogramming and multi-tasking at the same time.[1] Its introduction in the 1960s and emergence as the prominent model of computing in the 1970s represented a major technological shift in the history of computing. By allowing a large number of users to interact concurrently with a single computer, time-sharing dramatically lowered the cost of providing computing capability, made it possible for individuals and organizations to use a computer without owning one,[2] and promoted the interactive use of computers and the development of new interactive applications.Contents1 History1.1 Batch processing 1.2 Time-sharing 1.3 Development 1.4 Time-sharing <
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Software Portability
Portability in high-level computer programming is the usability of the same software in different environments. The prerequirement for portability is the generalized abstraction between the application logic and system interfaces
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Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) is an Internet
Internet
standard for electronic mail (email) transmission. First defined by RFC 821 in 1982, it was last updated in 2008 with Extended SMTP additions by RFC 5321, which is the protocol in widespread use today. Although electronic mail servers and other mail transfer agents use SMTP to send and receive mail messages, user-level client mail applications typically use SMTP only for sending messages to a mail server for relaying. For retrieving messages, client applications usually use either IMAP or POP3. SMTP communication between mail servers uses TCP port 25. Mail clients on the other hand, often submit the outgoing emails to a mail server on port 587
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X.400
X.400 is a suite of ITU-T Recommendations that define standards for Data Communication Networks for Message Handling Systems (MHS) — more commonly known as email. At one time, the designers of X.400 were expecting it to be the predominant form of email, but this role has been taken by the SMTP-based Internet
Internet
e-mail. Despite this, it has been widely used within organizations and was a core part of Microsoft Exchange Server until 2006; variants continue to be important in military and aviation contexts.Contents1 History 2 Addressing 3 See also 4 Footnotes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links7.1 X.400 StandardsHistory[edit] The first X.400 Recommendations were published in 1984 (Red Book), and a substantially revised version was published in 1988 (Blue Book)
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POP3
In computing, the Post Office Protocol (POP) is an application-layer Internet standard protocol used by e-mail clients to retrieve e-mail from a server in an Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP) network.[1] POP version 3 (POP3) is the most recent level of development in common use
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IMAP
In computing, the Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) is an Internet standard protocol used by e-mail clients to retrieve e-mail messages from a mail server over a TCP/IP connection.[1] IMAP is defined by RFC 3501. IMAP was designed with the goal of permitting complete management of an email box by multiple email clients, therefore clients generally leave messages on the server until the user explicitly deletes them. An IMAP server typically listens on port number 143. IMAP over SSL (IMAPS) is assigned the port number 993. Virtually all modern e-mail clients and servers support IMAP
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Placeholder Names In Cryptography
Alice and Bob
Alice and Bob
are fictional characters commonly used as placeholder names in cryptology, as well as science and engineering literature. The Alice and Bob
Alice and Bob
characters were invented by Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Leonard Adleman
Leonard Adleman
in their 1978 paper "A method for obtaining digital signatures and public-key cryptosystems."[1] Subsequently, they have become common archetypes in many scientific and engineering fields, such as quantum cryptography, game theory and physics.[2] As the use of Alice and Bob
Alice and Bob
became more popular, additional characters were added, each with a particular meaning.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Cast of characters 4 Physics 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Alice and Bob
Alice and Bob
are the names of fictional characters used for convenience and to aid comprehension
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Mail Submission Agent
A message submission agent (MSA) or mail submission agent is a computer program or software agent that receives electronic mail messages from a mail user agent (MUA) and cooperates with a mail transfer agent (MTA) for delivery of the mail
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A-bomb
A nuclear weapon is an explosive device that derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions, either fission (fission bomb) or from a combination of fission and fusion reactions (thermonuclear bomb). Both bomb types release large quantities of energy from relatively small amounts of matter. The first test of a fission ("atomic") bomb released an amount of energy approximately equal to 20,000 tons of TNT (84 TJ). The first thermonuclear ("hydrogen") bomb test released energy approximately equal to 10 million tons of TNT (42 PJ).[1] A thermonuclear weapon weighing little more than 2,400 pounds (1,100 kg) can release energy equal to more than 1.2 million tons of TNT (5.0 PJ).[2] A nuclear device no larger than traditional bombs can devastate an entire city by blast, fire, and radiation
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Username
A user is a person who uses a computer or network service. Users generally use a system or a software product[1] without the technical expertise required to fully understand it.[1] Power users use advanced features of programs, though they are not necessarily capable of computer programming and system administration.[2][3] A user often has a user account and is identified to the system by a username (or user name). Other terms for username include login name, screenname (or screen name), nickname (or nick) and handle, which is derived from the identical Citizen's Band radio
Citizen's Band radio
term. Some software products provide services to other systems and have no direct end users.Contents1 End user 2 User account2.1 Username format3 Terminology 4 See also 5 ReferencesEnd user[edit] See also: End user End users are the ultimate human users (also referred to as operators) of a software product
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Domain Name
A domain name is an identification string that defines a realm of administrative autonomy, authority or control within the Internet. Domain names are formed by the rules and procedures of the Domain Name System (DNS). Any name registered in the DNS is a domain name. Domain names are used in various networking contexts and application-specific naming and addressing purposes. In general, a domain name represents an Internet
Internet
Protocol (IP) resource, such as a personal computer used to access the Internet, a server computer hosting a web site, or the web site itself or any other service communicated via the Internet. In 2017, 330.6 million domain names had been registered.[1] Domain names are organized in subordinate levels (subdomains) of the DNS root domain, which is nameless
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