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RAF Church Fenton
Leeds
Leeds
East Airport
Airport
Church Fenton
Church Fenton
(ICAO: EGCM), formerly known as RAF Church Fenton, is an airport and former Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
station located 4.3 miles (6.9 km) south east of Tadcaster, North Yorkshire, England
England
and 6.3 miles (10.1 km) north west of Selby, North Yorkshire, near the village of Church Fenton
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International Air Transport Association Airport Code
An IATA airport code, also known as an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier,[1] is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association
International Air Transport Association
(IATA). The characters prominently displayed on baggage tags attached at airport check-in desks are an example of a way these codes are used. The assignment of these codes is governed by IATA Resolution 763, and it is administered by IATA headquarters in Montreal. The codes are published semiannually in the IATA Airline Coding Directory.[2] IATA also provides codes for railway stations and for airport handling entities. A list of airports sorted by IATA code is available. A list of railway station codes, shared in agreements between airlines and rail lines such as Amtrak, SNCF
SNCF
French Rail, and Deutsche Bahn, is available
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No. 25 Squadron RAF
No. 25(F) Squadron (alternatively No. XXV(F) Squadron) was a squadron of the Royal Air Force. Until April 2008 the squadron operated the Panavia Tornado
Panavia Tornado
F3, from RAF Leeming.Contents1 History1.1 The first years 1.2 Hawkinge station 1.3 During World War II 1.4 Entering the jet age 1.5 The Bloodhound missile years 1.6 On Tornados2 See also 3 References3.1 Notes 3.2 Bibliography4 External linksHistory[edit] The first years[edit] No. 2 5 Squadron RAF
5 Squadron RAF
was formed at RAF Montrose
RAF Montrose
on 25 September 1915 from No. 6 Reserve Squadron,[3] moving to France in February 1916, flying F.E.2bs on fighter and reconnaissance duties
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Bradford
Bradford
Bradford
/ˈbrædfərd/ ( listen) is in the Metropolitan Borough of the City of Bradford
City of Bradford
in West Yorkshire, England, in the foothills of the Pennines
Pennines
8.6 miles (14 km) west of Leeds, and 16 miles (26 km) northwest of Wakefield. Bradford
Bradford
became a municipal borough in 1847, and received its charter as a city in 1897
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Sheffield
Sheffield
Sheffield
(/ˈʃɛfiːəld/ ( listen)) is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, its name derives from the River Sheaf, which runs through the city. With some of its southern suburbs annexed from Derbyshire, the city has grown from its largely industrial roots to encompass a wider economic base. The population of the City of Sheffield
Sheffield
is 575,400 (mid-2016 est.)[2] and it is one of the eight largest regional English cities that make up the Core Cities Group.[3] Sheffield
Sheffield
is the third largest English district by population. The metropolitan population of Sheffield
Sheffield
is 1,569,000.[1] The city is in the eastern foothills of the Pennines, and the valleys of the River Don and its four tributaries, the Loxley, the Porter Brook, the Rivelin and the Sheaf
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International Civil Aviation Organization Airport Code
The ICAO (/ˌaɪˌkeɪˈoʊ/, eye-KAY-oh) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter code designating aerodromes around the world. These codes are defined by the International Civil Aviation Organization, and published in ICAO Document 7910: Location Indicators are used by air traffic control and airline operations such as flight planning. ICAO codes are also used to identify other aviation facilities such as weather stations, International Flight Service Stations or Area Control Centers, whether or not they are located at airports. Flight information regions are also identified by a unique ICAO-code.Contents1 History 2 ICAO codes vs
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Brewster F2A Buffalo
The Brewster F2A Buffalo[1] was an American fighter aircraft which saw service early in World War II. Designed and built by the Brewster Aeronautical Corporation, it was one of the first U.S. monoplanes with an arrestor hook and other modifications for aircraft carriers. The Buffalo won a competition against the Grumman F4F Wildcat
Grumman F4F Wildcat
in 1939 to become the U.S. Navy's first monoplane fighter aircraft. Although superior to the Grumman F3F
Grumman F3F
biplane it replaced and the early F4Fs,[2] the Buffalo was largely obsolete when the United States
United States
entered the war, being unstable and overweight, especially when compared to the Japanese Mitsubishi A6M Zero.[3] Several nations, including Finland, Belgium, Britain and the Netherlands, ordered the Buffalo
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Hawker Hurricane
The Hawker Hurricane
Hawker Hurricane
is a British single-seat fighter aircraft of the 1930s–1940s that was designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd. for service with the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF). Although overshadowed in the public consciousness by the Supermarine Spitfire's role during Battle of Britain
Battle of Britain
in 1940, the Hurricane actually inflicted 60 percent of the losses sustained by the Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
in the engagement. The Hurricane went on to fight in all the major theatres of Second World War. The Hurricane originated from discussions during the early 1930s between RAF officials and British aircraft designer Sir Sydney Camm
Sydney Camm
on the topic of a proposed monoplane derivative of the Hawker Fury biplane
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Night Fighter
A night fighter (also known as all-weather fighter or all-weather interceptor for a period of time post-World War II[1]) is a fighter aircraft adapted for use at night or in other times of bad visibility. Night fighters began to be used in World War I
World War I
and included types that were specifically modified to operate at night. During World War II, night fighters were either purpose-built or day fighters modified to be effective night fighting combat aircraft, often employing radar or other systems for providing some sort of detection capability in low visibility
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De Havilland Mosquito
The de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito was a British twin-engine shoulder-winged multi-role combat aircraft. The crew of two, pilot and navigator, sat side by side. It served during and after the Second World War. It was one of few operational front-line aircraft of the era whose frame was constructed almost entirely of wood and was nicknamed The Wooden Wonder.[4] The Mosquito was also known affectionately as the "Mossie" to its crews.[5][nb 1] Originally conceived as an unarmed fast bomber, the Mosquito was adapted to roles including low to medium-altitude daytime tactical bomber, high-altitude night bomber, pathfinder, day or night fighter, fighter-bomber, intruder, maritime strike aircraft, and fast photo-reconnaissance aircraft
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No. 26 Squadron RAF
No. 26 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was formed in 1915 and was disbanded for the last time in 1976. The squadron's motto is N Wagter in die Lug (Afrikaans) (A guard in the sky), and the badge is a springbok's head couped.Contents1 History1.1 1915 to 1918 1.2 Between the wars 1.3 Second World War 1.4 Post war2 See also 3 References3.1 Sources4 External linksHistory[edit] 1915 to 1918[edit] No. 26 Squadron was formed at Netheravon on 8 October 1915 from personnel of the South African Air Corps.[2] It was equipped with B.E.s and Farmans and sent to East Africa in 1915, arriving in Mombasa at the end of January 1916. In February 1918 it was dispatched back to the UK where it was disbanded in July 1918.[3] Between the wars[edit] On 11 October 1927, No. 26 was reformed at Catterick as a single flight of Armstrong Whitworth Atlas army co-operation aircraft; on 1 September 1938 a second flight was added
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Gloster Gladiator
The Gloster Gladiator
Gloster Gladiator
(or Gloster SS.37) is a British-built biplane fighter. It was used by the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) and the Fleet Air Arm (FAA) (as the Sea Gladiator variant) and was exported to a number of other air forces during the late 1930s. It was the RAF's last biplane fighter aircraft and was rendered obsolete by newer monoplane designs even as it was being introduced. Though often pitted against more formidable foes during the early days of the Second World War, it acquitted itself reasonably well in combat. The Gladiator saw action in almost all theatres during the Second World War, with a large number of air forces, some of them on the Axis side. The RAF used it in France, Norway, Greece, the defence of Malta, the Middle East, and the brief Anglo-Iraqi War
Anglo-Iraqi War
(during which the Royal Iraqi Air Force was similarly equipped)
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No. 68 Squadron RAF
The name No. 68 Squadron has been used for two quite different units, only one of which was strictly a unit of the Royal Air Force. "No. 68 Squadron RFC" was for a time the official British military designation for No. 2 Squadron Australian Flying Corps.Contents1 World War I 2 World War II 3 1950s 4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Works cited6 External linksWorld War I[edit]A DH.5 aeroplane of No. 2 Squadron, AFC (AKA "68 squadron RFC")No. 2 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps
Australian Flying Corps
was formed at Heliopolis, Egypt
Egypt
in 1916.[4] For a while it was known to the British military as "No. 68 Squadron RFC" - according to some accounts in order to avoid confusion with No. 2 Squadron, RFC
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No. 72 Squadron RAF
No. 72 Squadron Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
is currently a training squadron based at RAF Linton-on-Ouse
RAF Linton-on-Ouse
using the Short Tucano
Short Tucano
T.1, a modified version of the Brazilian Embraer EMB-312 Tucano
Embraer EMB-312 Tucano
training aircraft. 72 Squadron started its service life supporting the army during World War I
World War I
on operations in Middle East
Middle East
and afterwards was quickly disbanded. In its second incarnation the squadron was a real fighter unit, transitioning from Gloster Gladiator
Gloster Gladiator
biplanes[11] to Gloster Javelin
Gloster Javelin
all-weather jets, in between flying the Supermarine Spitfire
Supermarine Spitfire
during the Battle of Britain
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No. 73 Squadron RAF
No. 73 Squadron, Royal Air Force was formed on 2 July 1917 during the First World War. It was disbanded in 1969.Contents1 World War I1.1 Combat operations 1.2 Aircraft used2 World War II 3 1950s 4 References 5 External linksWorld War I[edit] It was initially a unit of the Royal Flying Corps and was formed out of the Central Flying School, based at Upavon, Wiltshire. Eight days after, the new unit moved to RFC Lilbourne, near Rugby. The squadron, only for a matter of days led by Lieutenant C A Mercer, came under the command of Major H F A Gordon and started a phase of training at Lilbourne. From September 1917, this became more specifically targeted towards operating in combat when a Programme of Development was received, instructing the unit to prepare for an overseas deployment on 22 December. This training phase saw a number of accidents and incidents, not uncommon in military aviation at that time
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No. 87 Squadron RAF
No. 87 Squadron RAF
No. 87 Squadron RAF
was an aircraft squadron of the Royal Air Force during the First World War and Second World War.Contents1 World War I 2 World War II 3 The Cold War 4 Aircraft 5 Notable pilots 6 Notes6.1 References 6.2 Bibliography7 External linksWorld War I[edit] 87 Squadron Royal Flying Corps
Royal Flying Corps
(RFC) was first formed on 1 September 1917 at Upavon from elements of the Central Flying School
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