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R2-D2
R2-D2
R2-D2
(/ˌɑːrtuːˈdiːtuː/), or Artoo-Detoo[citation needed], is a fictional robot character in the Star Wars
Star Wars
franchise created by George Lucas. A small astromech droid, R2-D2
R2-D2
is a major character and appears in all 8 Star Wars
Star Wars
films to date. Throughout the course of the films, R2 is a friend to Padmé Amidala, Anakin Skywalker, Leia Organa, Luke Skywalker, and Obi-Wan Kenobi
Obi-Wan Kenobi
in various points in the saga. English actor Kenny Baker played R2-D2
R2-D2
in all three original Star Wars films, and received billing credit for the character in the prequel trilogy, where Baker's role was reduced, as R2-D2
R2-D2
was portrayed mainly by radio controlled props and CGI models
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Special Effect
Special
Special
effects (often abbreviated as SFX, SPFX, or simply FX) are illusions or visual tricks used in the film, television, theatre, video game and simulator industries to simulate the imagined events in a story or virtual world. Special
Special
effects are traditionally divided into the categories of optical effects and mechanical effects. With the emergence of digital film-making a distinction between special effects and visual effects has grown, with the latter referring to digital post-production while "special effects" referring to mechanical and optical effects. Mechanical effects (also called practical or physical effects) are usually accomplished during the live-action shooting. This includes the use of mechanized props, scenery, scale models, animatronics, pyrotechnics and atmospheric effects: creating physical wind, rain, fog, snow, clouds, making a car appear to drive by itself and blowing up a building, etc
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Brian Johnson (special Effects Artist)
Brian Johnson (born 1939[1] or 1940)[2] is a British designer and director of film and television special effects.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Awards2 Filmography2.1 Special
Special
effects 2.2 Director3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Born Brian Johncock,[3] he changed his surname to Johnson during the 1960s.[3] Joining the team of special effects artist Les Bowie, Johnson started his career behind the scenes for Bowie Films on productions such as On The Buses, and for Hammer Films. He is known for his special effects work on TV series including Thunderbirds (1965–66) and films including Alien (1979),[4] for which he received the 1980 Academy Award for Best Visual Effects (shared with H. R. Giger, Carlo Rambaldi, Dennis Ayling and Nick Allder)
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Comic Relief
Comic
Comic
relief is the inclusion of a humorous character, scene, or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension.Contents1 Definition 2 Use 3 Examples 4 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Comic
Comic
relief usually means a releasing of emotional or other tension resulting from a comic episode interposed in the midst of serious or tragic elements in a drama. Comic
Comic
relief often takes the form of a bumbling, wisecracking sidekick of the hero or villain in a work of fiction. A sidekick used for comic relief will usually comment on the absurdity of the hero's situation and make comments that would be inappropriate for a character who is to be taken seriously. Other characters may use comic relief as a means to irritate others or keep themselves confident. Use[edit] Sometimes comic relief characters will appear in fiction that is comic
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American Graffiti
American Graffiti
American Graffiti
is a 1973 American coming-of-age comedy film directed and co-written by George Lucas
George Lucas
starring Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, Paul Le Mat, Harrison Ford, Charles Martin Smith, Cindy Williams, Candy Clark, Mackenzie Phillips, Bo Hopkins, and Wolfman Jack. Suzanne Somers
Suzanne Somers
and Joe Spano also appear in the film. Set in Modesto, California
Modesto, California
in 1962, the film is a study of the cruising and rock and roll cultures popular among the post–World War II baby boom generation. The film is told in a series of vignettes, telling the story of a group of teenagers and their adventures over a single night. The genesis of American Graffiti
American Graffiti
was in Lucas' own teenage years in early 1960s Modesto
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Male
A male (♂) organism is the physiological sex that produces sperm. Each spermatozoon can fuse with a larger female gamete, or ovum, in the process of fertilization. A male cannot reproduce sexually without access to at least one ovum from a female, but some organisms can reproduce both sexually and asexually. Most male mammals, including male humans, have a Y chromosome, which codes for the production of larger amounts of testosterone to develop male reproductive organs. Not all species share a common sex-determination system. In most animals, including humans, sex is determined genetically, but in some species it can be determined due to social, environmental, or other factors
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Mick Garris
Mick Garris
Mick Garris
(born December 4, 1951) is an American filmmaker and screenwriter born in Santa Monica, California.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Awards 3 Selected filmography3.1 As writer4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Garris was born in Santa Monica, California. He is known for his adaptations of Stephen King
Stephen King
stories, such as directing the horror film Sleepwalkers starring Mädchen Amick[2] and is the creator of the Showtime series Masters of Horror[3] and the NBC
NBC
series Fear Itself. Garris won a 1986 Edgar Award for an episode he wrote for the Steven Spielberg-produced television series Amazing Stories
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Billing (filmmaking)
Billing is a performing arts term used in referring to the order and other aspects of how credits are presented for plays, films, television, or other creative works. Information given in billing usually consists of the companies, actors, directors, producers, and other crew members.Contents1 Films1.1 History 1.2 Billing order 1.3 Studio vs
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Kit West
Kit West (6 February 1936 – 17 April 2016) was a British special effects artist who was most known for his work in Raiders of the Lost Ark and Return of the Jedi.Contents1 Early life 2 Oscar history 3 BAFTA award 4 Death 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Born in London, his early films were government and military training films produced by Realist Film Unit.[1] He served two years in the British Army, where he gained experience in pyrotechnics.[2] Oscar history[edit] All these were for Best Visual Effects.1981 Academy Awards-Raiders of the Lost Ark, award shared with Richard Edlund, Joe Johnston
Joe Johnston
and Bruce Nicholson. Won the Oscar.[3] 1985 Academy Awards-Young Sherlock Holmes, nomination shared with David W. Allen, John Ellis and Dennis Muren. Lost to Cocoon.[4] 1996 Academy Awards-Dragonheart, nomination shared with Scott Squires, James Straus and Phil Tippett
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John Stears
Stears is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:Anne Stears, South African cricketer John Stears (1934–1999), English special effects expert Marc Stears (born 1971), English political scientistSee also[edit]Stear (other)This page lists people with the surname Stears
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Radio Control
Radio control
Radio control
(often abbreviated to R/C or simply RC) is the use of radio signals to remotely control a device. Radio control
Radio control
is used for control of model vehicles from a hand-held radio transmitter. Industrial, military, and scientific research organizations make use of radio-controlled vehicles as well.Contents1 History 2 Second World War 3 Radio-controlled models 4 Modern military and aerospace applications 5 Industrial radio remote control 6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 Further readingHistory[edit]In 1898, Tesla
Tesla
demonstrated a radio-controlled boat (U.S
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Radio-controlled Model
A radio-controlled model (or RC model) is a model that is steerable with the use of radio control. All types of model vehicles have had RC systems installed in them, including cars, boats, planes, and even helicopters and scale railway locomotives.Contents1 History 2 Design 3 Mass production3.1 Hobby grade RC4 Types4.1 Aircraft 4.2 Tanks 4.3 Cars 4.4 Logistic 4.5 Helicopters 4.6 Boats 4.7 Submarines 4.8 Combat robotics5 Power5.1 Internal combustion 5.2 Electrical6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]In 1898, Tesla demonstrated a radio-controlled boat (U.S. Patent 613,809 —Method of an Apparatus for Controlling Mechanism of Moving Vehicle
Vehicle
or Vehicles). Radio control
Radio control
has been around since Nikola Tesla
Nikola Tesla
demonstrated a remote control boat in 1898. World War II
World War II
saw increased development in radio control technology
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Computer-generated Imagery
Computer-generated imagery
Computer-generated imagery
(CGI) is the application of computer graphics to create or contribute to images in art, printed media, video games, films, television programs, shorts, commercials, videos, and simulators. The visual scenes may be dynamic or static and may be two-dimensional (2D), though the term "CGI" is most commonly used to refer to 3D computer graphics
3D computer graphics
used for creating scenes or special effects in films and television. Additionally, the use of 2D CGI is often mistakenly referred to as "traditional animation", most often in the case when dedicated animation software such as Adobe Flash
Adobe Flash
or Toon Boom is not used or the CGI is hand drawn using a tablet and mouse. The term 'CGI animation' refers to dynamic CGI rendered as a movie. The term virtual world refers to agent-based, interactive environments
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Voice Acting
Voice acting
Voice acting
is the art of performing voice-overs or providing voices to represent a character or to provide information to an audience or user. Examples include animated, off-stage, off-screen or non-visible characters in various works, including feature films, dubbed foreign language films, animated short films, television programs, commercials, radio or audio dramas, comedy, video games, puppet shows, amusement rides, audiobooks and documentaries. Voice acting
Voice acting
is also done for small handheld audio games. Performers are called voice actors or actresses, voice artists or voice talent. Their roles may also involve singing, although a second voice actor is sometimes cast as the character's singing voice
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Silent Running
Silent Running
Silent Running
is a 1972 environmental-themed American post-apocalyptic science fiction film the directorial debut of Douglas Trumbull, and stars Bruce Dern, Cliff Potts, Ron Rifkin
Ron Rifkin
and Jesse Vint.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Soundtrack 5 Reception 6 Adaptation 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksPlot[edit] In the future, all plant life on Earth has become extinct. A few specimens have been preserved in enormous, greenhouse-like geodesic domes attached to a fleet of American Airlines
American Airlines
space freighters, currently just outside the orbit of Saturn
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