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R. H. W. Dillard
Richard Henry Wilde Dillard[1] (born October 11, 1937) is an American poet, author, critic, and translator.[2] Born in Roanoke, Virginia, Dillard is best known as a poet.[1] He is also highly regarded as a writer of fiction and critical essays, as well as one of the screenwriters for the cult classic Frankenstein Meets the Space Monster.[3] He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Roanoke College and went on to receive of a Master of Arts (1959) and the Ph. D. (1965) from the University of Virginia.[2] While at the University of Virginia he was both a Woodrow Wilson and a DuPont Fellow.[1] He is considered something of an institution at Hollins University where he has been teaching creative writing, literature, and film studies since 1964. Dillard has been the editor of the Hollins Critic since 1996
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Scarecrow Press
Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing house founded in 1949. Under several imprints, the company offers scholarly books for the academic market, as well as trade books. The company also owns the book distributing company National Book Network based in Lanham, Maryland. The current company took shape when University Press of America acquired Rowman & Littlefield in 1988 and took the Rowman & Littlefield name for the parent company. Since 2013, there has also been an affiliated company based in London, UK called Rowman & Littlefield International. It is editorially independent and publishes only academic books in Philosophy, Politics & International Relations and Cultural Studies. The company sponsors the Rowman & Littlefield Award in Innovative Teaching, the only national teaching award in political science given in the United States
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Donald F. Glut
Donald F. Glut (/ɡlt/; born February 19, 1944)[2] is an American writer, motion picture film director, and screenwriter. He is best known for writing the novelization of the second Star Wars film, The Empire Strikes Back. From 1953 to 1969, Glut made a total of 41 amateur films, on subjects ranging from dinosaurs, to unauthorized adaptations of such characters as Superman, The Spirit, and Spider-Man.[3] Due to publicity he received in the pages of Forrest J Ackerman's magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland, Glut was able to achieve a degree of notoriety based on his work
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Louisiana State University Press
The Louisiana State University Press (LSU Press) is a university press that was founded in 1935. It publishes works of scholarship as well as general interest books. LSU Press is a member of the Association of American University Presses. LSU Press publishes approximately 70 new books each year and has a backlist of over 2000 titles. Primary fields of publication include southern history, southern literary studies, Louisiana and the Gulf South, the American Civil War and military history, roots music, southern culture, environmental studies, European history, foodways, poetry, fiction, media studies, and landscape architecture
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Plautus
Titus Maccius Plautus (/ˈplɔːtəs/; c. 254 – 184 BC), commonly known as Plautus, was a Roman playwright of the Old Latin period. His comedies are the earliest Latin literary works to have survived in their entirety. He wrote Palliata comoedia, the genre devised by the innovator of Latin literature, Livius Andronicus. The word Plautine /ˈplɔːtn/ refers to both Plautus's own works and works similar to or influenced by his. Not much is known about Titus Maccius Plautus' early life. It is believed that he was born in Sarsina, a small town in Emilia Romagna in northern Italy, around 254 BC.[1] According to Morris Marples, Plautus worked as a stage-carpenter or scene-shifter in his early years.[2] It is from this work, perhaps, that his love of the theater originated
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Madison Smartt Bell
Madison Smartt Bell (born August 1, 1957 in Nashville, Tennessee) is an American novelist. While established as a writer with several novels, he is especially known for his trilogy of novels about Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution, published 1995–2004. Raised in Nashville, Tennessee, Madison Smartt Bell is a graduate of Montgomery Bell Academy. He is a graduate of Princeton University, where he won the Ward Mathis Prize and the Francis Leymoyne Page award, and Hollins University, where he won the Andrew James Purdy fiction award.[1] He later lived in New York City and London before settling in Baltimore, Maryland
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Wyn Cooper
Wyn Cooper (born 1957) is an American poet. He is best known for his 1987 poem "Fun", which was adapted by Sheryl Crow and Bill Bottrell into the lyrics of Crow's 1994 breakthrough single "All I Wanna Do". Cooper was raised in Michigan and later attended the University of Utah and Hollins College.[1] He has taught at the University of Utah, Bennington College, Marlboro College, and at The Frost Place Festival of Poetry. His most recent book is Mars Poetica (White Pine Press, 2018) His earlier books are Chaos is the New Calm (BOA Editions, 2010), Postcards from the Interior (BOA Editions, 2005), The Way Back (White Pine Press, 2000), and The Country of Here Below (Ahsahta Press, 1987). Cooper's poems, stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in Poetry, Orion, AGNI, Crazyhorse, and Ploughshares[2] and are included in 25 anthologies of contemporary poetry
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