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Qwara Dialect
Qwara, or Qwareña (called "Falasha" (Hwarasa) in some older sources), was one of two Agaw dialects, spoken by a subgroup of the Beta Israel (Ethiopian Jews) of the Qwara area. It is a dialect of Qimant. It is nearly extinct.[citation needed] Several early Falashan manuscripts, using the Ge'ez alphabet, exist; in more recent times, the language has been recorded by several linguists and travellers, starting with Flad in 1866. The language was on the decline in the early 20th century, as it was being replaced by Amharic. During Operation Solomon, most of its remaining speakers were airlifted to Israel, where it continues to lose ground to Hebrew.Contents1 See also 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksSee also[edit]Kayla dialectReferences[edit]^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Hwarasa". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
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Operation Solomon
Operation Solomon
Operation Solomon
(Hebrew: מבצע שלמה‎, Mivtza Shlomo) was a covert Israeli military operation to airlift Ethiopian Jews
Ethiopian Jews
to Israel from May 24 to May 25, 1991. Non-stop flights of 35 Israeli aircraft, including Israeli Air Force
Israeli Air Force
C-130s and El Al
El Al
Boeing 747s, transported 14,325 Ethiopian Jews
Ethiopian Jews
to Israel
Israel
in 36 hours.[1]Contents1 History 2 Operation 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit] In 1991, the sitting Ethiopian government of Mengistu Haile Mariam
Mengistu Haile Mariam
was close to being toppled with the military successes of Eritrean and Tigrean rebels, threatening Ethiopia
Ethiopia
with dangerous political destabilization
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Israel
Coordinates: 31°N 35°E / 31°N 35°E / 31; 35State of Israelמְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (Hebrew) دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل (Arabic)FlagEmblemAnthem: "Hatikvah" (Hebrew for "The Hope")(pre-) 1967 border (Green Line)Capital and largest city Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(limited recognition)[fn 1] 31°47′N 35°13′E / 31.783°N 35.217°E / 31.783; 35.217Official languagesHebrew ArabicEthnic
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Amhara Region
Amhara (Amharic: አማራ) is one of the nine ethnic divisions (kililoch) of Ethiopia, containing the homeland of the Amhara people. Previously known as Region 3, its capital is Bahir Dar. Ethiopia's largest inland body of water, Lake Tana, which is the source of the Blue Nile
Blue Nile
river, is located within Amhara. The region also contains the Semien Mountains
Semien Mountains
National Park, which includes Ras Dashan, the highest point in Ethiopia
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Amharic Language
Amharic
Amharic
(/æmˈhærɪk/[5][6][7] or /ɑːmˈhɑːrɪk/;[8] Amharic: አማርኛ, Amarəñña, IPA: [amarɨɲːa] ( listen)) is an Afroasiatic language of the Semitic branch, a member of the Ethiosemitic group. It is spoken as a mother tongue by the Amhara, and as a lingua franca by other populations residing in major cities and towns of Ethiopia
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Ge'ez Alphabet
9th–8th century BC to present (abjad until c. 330 AD) Ge'ez
Ge'ez
scriptParent systems Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
[1]Proto-SinaiticSouth Arabian[2][3]Ge'ezChild systemsAmharic alphabet, various other alphabets of Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and EritreaDirection Left-to-rightISO 15924 Ethi, 430 Unicode
Unicode
aliasEthiopic Unicode
Unicode
rangeU+1200–U+137F Ethiopic U+1380–U+139F Ethiopic Supplement U+2D80–U+2DDF Ethiopic Extended U+AB00–U+AB2F Ethiopic Extended-AThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.This article contains Ethiopic text
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Qwara Province
Qwara (Amharic: ቋራ) (also spelled K'wara) was a province in Ethiopia, located between Lake Tana
Lake Tana
and the frontier with Sudan, and stretching from Agawmeder in the south as far north as Metemma. It was eventually absorbed into the province of Begemder. Overview[edit] The region contains a large Kemant community, some speaking the nearly extinct Kemant language, and was formerly inhabited by a substantial number of Beta Israel, who spoke the Qwara language. However, most of its inhabitants have since been assimilated into the dominant Amhara ethnicity, and speak Amharic. It consists of many ethnic groups such as Amhara which contain majority, Tigre, Kimant, Bête Israel, and Agaw
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Jew
Jews
Jews
(Hebrew: יְהוּדִים‬ ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group[12] and a nation[13][14][15] originating from the Israelites,[16][17][18] or Hebrews,[19][20] of the Ancient Near East. Jewish ethnicity, nationhood, and religion are strongly interrelated,[21] as
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Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
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ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
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Afroasiatic Languages
Afroasiatic (Afro-Asiatic), also known as Afrasian and traditionally as Hamito-Semitic (Chamito-Semitic)[3] or Semito-Hamitic,[4] is a large language family of about 300 languages and dialects.[5] It includes languages spoken predominantly in West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa
Horn of Africa
and parts of the Sahel. Afroasiatic languages
Afroasiatic languages
have over 495 million native speakers, the fourth largest number of any language family (after Indo-European, Sino-Tibetan and Niger–Congo).[6] The phylum has six branches: Berber, Chadic, Cushitic, Egyptian, Omotic
Omotic
and Semitic. By far the most widely spoken Afroasiatic language is Arabic. A language within the Semitic branch, it includes Modern Standard Arabic as well as spoken colloquial varieties
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Language Family
A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family. The term "family" reflects the tree model of language origination in historical linguistics, which makes use of a metaphor comparing languages to people in a biological family tree, or in a subsequent modification, to species in a phylogenetic tree of evolutionary taxonomy. Linguists therefore describe the daughter languages within a language family as being genetically related.[1] According to Ethnologue
Ethnologue
the 7,099 living human languages are distributed in 141 different language families.[2] A "living language" is simply one that is used as the primary form of communication of a group of people
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Extinct Language
An extinct language is a language that no longer has any speakers,[1] especially if it has no living descendants. In contrast, a dead language is "one that is no longer the native language of any community", even if it is still in use, like Latin.[2] In the modern period, language death has typically resulted from the process of cultural assimilation leading to language shift, and the gradual abandonment of a native language in favour of a foreign lingua franca. A language that currently has living native speakers is called a modern language. As of the 2000s, a total of roughly 7,000 natively spoken languages existed worldwide
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Saho Language
The Saho language (Tigrinya: ሳሆኛ) is an Afro-Asiatic language spoken in Eritrea, Sudan and Ethiopia. It belongs to the family's Cushitic branch.Contents1 Overview 2 Notes 3 External links 4 Further readingOverview[edit] Saho is spoken natively by the Saho people. They traditionally inhabit territory in Eritrea
Eritrea
bounded by the bay of Erafayle in the east, the Laasi Ghedé valleys in the south, and the Eritrean highlands
Eritrean highlands
to the west (Akele Guzai, Shimejana). This speech area is bordered by other Afro-Asiatic-speaking communities, with Tigre speakers on the west and Afar speakers on the east. In Ethiopia, Saho or Assawort is primarily spoken in the Tigray Region
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