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Quorum Of Twelve Apostles
In Christian theology
Christian theology
and ecclesiology, the apostles (Greek: ἀπόστολος, translit. apóstolos, lit. 'one who is sent away'), particularly the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
(also known as the Twelve Disciples or simply the Twelve), were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity. During the life and ministry of Jesus
Jesus
in the 1st century AD, the apostles were his closest followers and became the primary teachers of the gospel message of Jesus. The word disciple is sometimes used interchangeably with apostle; for instance, the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
makes no distinction between the two terms[citation needed]. In modern usage, prominent missionaries are often called apostles, a practice which stems from the Latin
Latin
equivalent of apostle, i.e. missio, the source of the English word missionary
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Disciple (Christianity)
In Christianity, the term disciple primarily refers to dedicated followers of Jesus. This term is found in the New Testament
New Testament
only in the Gospels and Acts. In the ancient world a disciple is a follower or adherent of a teacher. It is not the same as being a student in the modern sense. A disciple in the ancient biblical world actively imitated both the life and teaching of the master.[1] It was a deliberate apprenticeship which made the fully formed disciple a living copy of the master. The New Testament
New Testament
records many followers of Jesus
Jesus
during his ministry. Some disciples were given a mission, such as the Little Commission, the commission of the 70 in Luke's gospel, the Great Commission
Great Commission
after the resurrection of Jesus, or the conversion of Paul, making them Apostles, charged with proclaiming the gospel (the Good News) to the world
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Pneumatology (Christianity)
Pneumatology in Christianity
Christianity
refers to a particular discipline within Christian theology
Christian theology
that focuses on the study of the Holy Spirit. The term is essentially derived from the Greek word Pneuma (πνεῦμα), which designates "breath" or "spirit" and metaphorically describes a non-material being or influence. The English term pneumatology comes from two Greek words: πνευμα (pneuma, spirit) and λογος (logos, teaching about)
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God In Christianity
God
God
in Christianity
Christianity
is the eternal being who created and preserves all things
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Trinity
The Christian doctrine of the Trinity
Trinity
(Latin: Trinitas, lit. 'triad', from trinus, "threefold")[2] holds that God
God
is three consubstantial persons[3] or hypostases[4]—the Father, the Son ( Jesus
Jesus
Christ), and the Holy Spirit—as "one God
God
in three Divine Persons"
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God The Son
God the Son
God the Son
(Greek: Θεός ὁ υἱός) is the second person, of the Trinity
Trinity
in Christian theology. The doctrine of the Trinity identifies Jesus
Jesus
as the metaphysical embodiment of God the Son, united in essence (consubstantial) but distinct in person with regard to God the Father and God the Holy Spirit (the first and third persons of the Trinity). In these teachings, God the Son
God the Son
pre-existed before incarnation, is co-eternal with God the Father
God the Father
(and the Holy Spirit), both before Creation and after the End (see Eschatology)
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Holy Spirit In Christianity
For the majority of Christian denominations, the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
or Holy Ghost is the third person (hypostasis) of the Trinity: the Triune God manifested as God the Father, God the Son, and Holy Spirit; each person itself being God.[2][3][4] Some Christian theologians identify the Holy Spirit
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Christian Apologetics
Christian apologetics
Christian apologetics
(Greek: ἀπολογία, "verbal defence, speech in defence")[1] is a branch of Christian theology
Christian theology
that aims to present historical, reasoned, and evidential bases for Christianity, defending it against objections.[2] Christian apologetics
Christian apologetics
have taken many forms over the centuries, starting with Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
in the early church and Patristic writers such as Origen, Augustine of Hippo, Justin Martyr
Justin Martyr
and Tertullian, then continuing with writers such as Thomas Aquinas
Thomas Aquinas
and Anselm of Canterbury
Anselm of Canterbury
during Scholasticism
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Baptism
Baptism
Baptism
(from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian
Christian
sacrament of admission and adoption,[1] almost invariably with the use of water, into the Christian Church
Christian Church
generally.[2][3] The canonical Gospels report that Jesus
Jesus
was baptized[4]—a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned.[5][6][7] Baptism
Baptism
has been called a holy sacrament and an ordinance of Jesus Christ
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Christology
Christology
Christology
(from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology
Christian theology
which is primarily concerned with the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
as recorded in the canonical Gospels and the epistles of the New Testament.[2][3][4] Primary considerations include the ontology and person of Jesus
Jesus
in conjunction with His relationship with that of God the Father. As such, Christology
Christology
is concerned with the details of Jesus' ministry, his acts and teachings, to arrive at a clearer understanding of who he is in his person, and his role in salvation.[5] The views of Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
provided a major component of the Christology
Christology
of the Apostolic Age
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History Of Christian Theology
The doctrine of the Trinity, considered the core of Christian
Christian
theology by Trinitarians, is the result of continuous exploration by the church of the biblical data, thrashed out in debate and treatises, eventually formulated at the First Council of Nicaea
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Christian Mission
A Christian mission
Christian mission
is an organized effort to spread Christianity.[1] Missions often involve sending individuals and groups, called missionaries, across boundaries, most commonly geographical boundaries, for the purpose of proselytism (conversion to Christianity, or from one Christian tradition to another). This involves evangelism (preaching a set of beliefs for the purpose of conversion), and humanitarian work, especially among the poor and disadvantaged. There are a few different kinds of mission trips: short-term, long-term, relational and ones meant simply for helping people in need. Some might choose to dedicate their whole lives to missions as well. Missionaries have the authority to preach the Christian faith (and sometimes to administer sacraments), and provide humanitarian work to improve economic development, literacy, education, health care, and orphanages
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Patriology
In Christian
Christian
theology, term Patriology
Patriology
refers to the study of the God the Father. The word Patriology
Patriology
comes from two Greek words: πατέρας (pateras, father) and λογος (logos, teaching about). As a theological discipline, Patriology
Patriology
is closely connected to Christology
Christology
(study of Christ
Christ
as God the Son) and Pneumatology (study of Holy Ghost as God the Spirit). The term Patriology
Patriology
should not be confused with similar term Patrology that involves the study of teachings of the Church Fathers. There are three basic forms of the name of God the Father
God the Father
in the New Testament: Theos (θεός the Greek woed for God), Kyrios
Kyrios
(i.e. Lord in Greek) and Pateras (πατέρας i.e
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Salvation In Christianity
Salvation
Salvation
in Christianity, or deliverance, is the saving of the soul from sin and its consequences.[1] Variant views on salvation are among the main fault lines dividing the various Christian denominations, being a point of disagreement between Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism
Roman Catholicism
and Protestantism, as well as within Protestantism, notably in the Calvinist–Arminian debate
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New Covenant
The New Covenant
New Covenant
(Hebrew ברית חדשה‬  berit hadashah (help·info); Greek διαθήκη καινή diatheke kaine) is a biblical interpretation originally derived from a phrase in the Book of Jeremiah, in the Hebrew Bible. It is often thought of as an eschatological (ultimate destiny of Humanity) Messianic Age
Messianic Age
or world to come and is related to the biblical concept of the Kingdom of God. Generally, Christians believe that the promised New Covenant
New Covenant
was instituted at the Last Supper
Last Supper
as part of the Eucharist,[1] which in the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
includes the New Commandment. Based on the Bible teaching that, "For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator
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History Of Christianity
The history of Christianity
Christianity
concerns the Christian religion, Christendom, and the Church with its various denominations, from the 1st century to the present. Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
and Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Christianity
spread to all of Europe in the Middle Ages. Christianity
Christianity
expanded throughout the world and became the world's largest religion due to European colonialism.[1] Today there are more than two billion Christians worldwide.[2]Contents1 Early Christianity
Christianity
(c
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