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Quintilian
Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (c. 35 – c. 100 AD) was a Roman rhetorician from Hispania, widely referred to in medieval schools of rhetoric and in Renaissance
Renaissance
writing. In English translation, he is usually referred to as Quintilian
Quintilian
(/kwɪnˈtɪliən/), although the alternate spellings of Quintillian and Quinctilian are occasionally seen, the latter in older texts.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Institutio Oratoria 4 Placement of Quintilian's rhetoric 5 Influence of Quintilian 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksLife[edit] Quintilian
Quintilian
was born c. 35 in Calagurris (Calahorra, La Rioja) in Hispania. His father, a well-educated man, sent him to Rome
Rome
to study rhetoric early in the reign of Nero. While there, he cultivated a relationship with Domitius Afer, who died in 59
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Quintillion
This article lists and discusses the usage and derivation of names of large numbers, together with their possible extensions. The following table lists those names of large numbers that are found in many English dictionaries and thus have a special claim to being "real words." The "Traditional British" values shown are unused in American English and are becoming rare in British English, but their other-language variants are dominant in many non-English-speaking areas, including continental Europe and Spanish-speaking countries in Latin
Latin
America; see Long and short scales. English also has many words, suc
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Leonardo Bruni
Leonardo Bruni
Leonardo Bruni
(or Leonardo Aretino) (c. 1370 – March 9, 1444) was an Italian humanist, historian and statesman, often recognized as the most important humanist historian of the early Renaissance.[1] He has been called the first modern historian.[2] He was the earliest person to write using the three-period view of history: Antiquity, Middle Ages, and Modern. The dates Bruni used to define the periods are not exactly what modern historians use today, but he laid the conceptual groundwork for a tripartite division of history.Contents1 Biography 2 Significance 3 Bibliography 4 Notes 5 References 6 External links6.1 Latin texts online 6.2 German texts onlineBiography[edit] Leonardo Bruni
Leonardo Bruni
was born in Arezzo, Tuscany
Tuscany
circa 1370
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Phaedrus (dialogue)
The Phaedrus (/ˈfiːdrəs/; Ancient Greek: Φαῖδρος, lit. 'Phaidros'), written by Plato, is a dialogue between Plato's protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several dialogues
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St. Augustine Of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
(/ɔːˈɡʌstɪn/; 13 November 354 – 28 August 430)[1] was an early Christian theologian
Christian theologian
and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity
Western Christianity
and Western philosophy. He was the bishop of Hippo Regius
Hippo Regius
in north Africa and is viewed as one of the most important Church Fathers
Church Fathers
in Western Christianity
Christianity
for his writings in the Patristic Era. Among his most important works are The City of God, On Christian Doctrine
On Christian Doctrine
and Confessions. According to his contemporary Jerome, Augustine "established anew the ancient Faith".[note 1] In his youth he was drawn to Manichaeism, later to neo-Platonism
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St. Jerome
Catholicism portal Philosophy
Philosophy
portalv t e Jerome
Jerome
(/dʒəˈroʊm/; Latin: Eusebius
Eusebius
Sophronius Hieronymus; Greek: Εὐσέβιος Σωφρόνιος Ἱερώνυμος; c. 27 March 347 – 30 September 420) was a priest, confessor, theologian, and historian. He was born at Stridon, a village near Emona
Emona
on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia.[2][3][4] He is best known for his translation of most of the Bible
Bible
into Latin
Latin
(the translation that became known as the Vulgate), and his commentaries on the Gospels. His list of writings is extensive.[5] The protégé of Pope
Pope
Damasus I, who died in December of 384, Jerome was known for his teachings on Christian moral life, especially to those living in cosmopolitan centers such as Rome
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Vulgate Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Vulgate
Vulgate
(/ˈvʌlɡeɪt, -ɡət/) is a late-4th-century Latin translation of the Bible
Bible
that became the Catholic Church's officially promulgated Latin
Latin
version of the Bible
Bible
during the 16th century. The translation was largely the work of St Jerome, who in 382 had been commissioned by Pope Damasus I
Pope Damasus I
to revise the Vetus Latina
Vetus Latina
("Old Latin") Gospels
Gospels
then in use by the Roman Church
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Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Renaissance Humanism
Renaissance
Renaissance
humanism is the study of classical antiquity, at first in Italy and then spreading across Western Europe
Western Europe
in the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries. The term Renaissance
Renaissance
humanism is contemporary to that period — Renaissance
Renaissance
(rinascimento, "rebirth") and "humanist" (whence modern humanism; also Renaissance
Renaissance
humanism to distinguish it from later developments grouped as humanism).[1] Renaissance
Renaissance
humanism was a response to the utilitarian approach and what came to be depicted as the "narrow pedantry" associated with medieval scholasticism.[2] Humanists sought to create a citizenry able to speak and write with eloquence and clarity and thus capable of engaging in the civic life of their communities and persuading others to virtuous and prudent actions
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St. Gall
Saint Gall, or Gallus (c. 550 – c. 646, German: Sankt Gallus) according to hagiographic tradition was a disciple and one of the traditional twelve companions of Saint Columbanus
Columbanus
on his mission from Ireland to the continent. Saint Deicolus
Saint Deicolus
is called an older brother of Gall.[clarification needed]Contents1 Biography 2 Legends 3 Veneration 4 Iconography 5 Legacy5.1 Abbey of St. Gall6 In popular culture 7 See also 8 Notes 9 Bibliography 10 External linksBiography[edit] The fragmentary oldest Life was recast in the 9th century by two monks of Reichenau, enlarged in 816–824 by Wettinus,[2] and about 833–884 by Walafrid Strabo, who also revised a book of the miracles of the saint. Other works ascribed to Walafrid tell of Saint Gall
Saint Gall
in prose and verse. Gallus' origin is a matter of dispute
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Petrarch
Francesco Petrarca (Italian: [franˈtʃesko peˈtrarka]; July 20, 1304 – July 20, 1374), commonly anglicized as Petrarch (/ˈpiːtrɑːrk, ˈpɛ-/), was an Italian scholar and poet in Renaissance
Renaissance
Italy, who was one of the earliest humanists. His rediscovery of Cicero's letters is often credited with initiating the 14th-century Renaissance
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Book Frontispiece
A frontispiece in books is a decorative or informative illustration facing a book's title page — on the left-hand, or verso, page opposite the right-hand, or recto, page.[1] While some books depict thematic elements, other books feature the author's portrait as the frontispiece. In medieval illuminated manuscripts, a presentation miniature showing the book or text being presented (by whom and to whom varies) was often used as a frontispiece.Contents1 Origin 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksOrigin[edit] The word comes from the French frontispice, or the late Latin frontispicium, from the Latin
Latin
frons ('forehead') and specere ('to look at'). It was synonymous with 'metoposcopy'. In English, it was originally used as an architectural term, referring to the decorative facade of a building
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Martin Luther
Martin Luther, O.S.A. (/ˈluːθər/;[1] German: [ˈmaɐ̯tiːn ˈlʊtɐ] ( listen); 10 November 1483[2] – 18 February 1546) was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk,[3] and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation. Luther came to reject several teachings and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. He strongly disputed the Catholic view on indulgences. Luther proposed an academic discussion of the practice and efficacy of indulgences in his Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
of 1517
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Erasmus
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t eDesiderius Erasmus
Erasmus
Roterodamus (/ˌdɛzɪˈdɪəriəs ɪˈræzməs/; 28 October 1466[1][2] – 12 July 1536), known as Erasmus
Erasmus
or Erasmus of Rotterdam,[note 1] was a Dutch Renaissance
Renaissance
humanist, Catholic priest, social critic, teacher, and theologian. Erasmus
Erasmus
was a classical scholar and wrote in a pure Latin style. Among humanists he enjoyed the sobriquet "Prince of the Humanists", and has been called "the crowning glory of the Christian humanists".[3] Using humanist techniques for working on texts, he prepared important new Latin and Greek editions of the New Testament, which raised questions that would be influential in the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
and Catholic Counter-Reformation
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Johann Sebastian Bach
Johann Sebastian Bach[a] (31 March [O.S. 21 March] 1685 – 28 July 1750) was a German composer and musician of the Baroque period. He is known for instrumental compositions such as the Brandenburg Concertos
Brandenburg Concertos
and the Goldberg Variations, and vocal music such as the St Matthew Passion and the Mass in B minor. Since the 19th-century Bach Revival he has been generally regarded as one of the greatest composers of all time.[3] The Bach family
Bach family
already counted several composers when Johann Sebastian was born as the last child of a city musician in Eisenach. Having become an orphan at age 10, he lived for five years with his eldest brother, after which he continued his musical formation in Lüneburg
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Alexander Pope
Alexander Pope
Alexander Pope
(21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) was an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, his translation of Homer
Homer
and for his use of the heroic couplet. He is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations after Shakespeare.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 Early career2 Poetry2.1 Essay on Criticism 2.2 Rape of the Lock 2.3 Dunciad
Dunciad
and Moral Essays 2.4 Essay on Man 2.5 Later life and works3 Translations and editions3.1 Translation of the Iliad 3.2 Translation of the Odyssey 3.3 Edition of Shakespeare's works4 Reception4.1 Historic 4.2 Feminist reception5 Works5.1 Major works 5.2 Other works 5.3 Editions6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksLife[edit]Portrait of Alexander Pope. Studio of Godfrey Kneller. Oil on canvas, c
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