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Quick Clay
Quick clay, also known as Leda clay and Champlain Sea
Champlain Sea
clay in Canada, is any of several distinctively sensitive glaciomarine clays found in Canada, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Finland, the United States
United States
and other locations around the world. The clay is so unstable that when a mass of quick clay is subjected to sufficient stress, the material behavior may transition from that of a particulate material to that of a fluid. Quick clay has a remolded strength and so is much less than its strength upon initial loading. That is caused by a highly unstable clay particle structure. Quick clay is typically originally deposited in a marine environment. In that environment, the positive charge of cations (such as sodium) was able to bind clay particles (negative surface charge) by balancing charge in the double layer
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Canada
Coordinates: 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95CanadaFlagMotto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare  (Latin) (English: "From Sea to Sea")Anthem: "O Canada"Royal anthem: "God Save the Queen"[1]Capital Ottawa 45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667Largest city TorontoOfficial languagesEnglish FrenchEthnic groupsList of ethnicities74.3% European 14.5% Asian 5.1% Indigenous 3.4% Caribbean and Latin American 2.9% African 0.2% Oceanian[2]ReligionList of religions67.2% Christianity 23.9% Non-religious 3.2% Islam 1.5% Hinduism 1.4% Sikhism 1.1% Buddhism 1.0% Judaism 0.6% Other -[3]Demonym CanadianGovernment Federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy[4]• MonarchElizabeth II• Governor GeneralJulie Payette• Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau• Chie
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Nepean, Ontario
Nepean /nəˈpiːən/ is a part of Ottawa, Ontario, located west of Ottawa's inner core. It was formerly a city in its own right until amalgamated with the Regional Municipality of Ottawa–Carleton in 2001 to become the new city of Ottawa. However, the name "Nepean" continues in common usage in reference to the area. The population of Nepean is about 180,000 people. Although the neighbouring municipality of Kanata formed the entrepreneurial and high tech center of the region, Nepean hosted noted industries such as Nortel Networks, JDS Uniphase
JDS Uniphase
and Gandalf Technologies. As with the rest of the National Capital Region, however, Nepean's economy was also heavily dependent on federal government employment
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Nicolet, Quebec
Nicolet, Quebec is the county seat of Nicolet-Yamaska Regional County Municipality, Quebec, Canada. The population as of the Canada 2011 Census was 7,828. It is the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Nicolet. The residents of the town pronounce the final "t" in Nicolet, however people outside of the region do not.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 Population 3.2 Language4 Economy4.1 Industry5 Education 6 Cultural 7 Transportation 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The town took its name from Jean Nicolet, a French explorer and clerk of the Company of One Hundred Associates, who explored the Great Lakes region west to Wisconsin
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South Nation River
The South Nation River
South Nation River
is a river in Eastern Ontario, Canada. It springs from forests and marshes located north of Brockville and it flows 175 kilometres (109 mi) northeast to empty into the Ottawa River north of Plantagenet.[1][2] Its watershed covers 3,900 square kilometres (1,500 sq mi). This river is called the "South Nation River" to distinguish it from a river in Quebec
Quebec
north of the Ottawa River
Ottawa River
called the Petite-Nation River or rivière Petite-Nation. The names of both rivers are derived from the French name for the native people of this area, the Weskarini. The area surrounding the river, originally covered with white pine, is now mainly used for agriculture. The river drains an almost flat plain, and its lack of gradient makes it prone to flooding
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Hectare
The hectare (/ˈhɛktɛər, -tɑːr/; SI symbol: ha) is an SI accepted metric system unit of area equal to 100 ares (10,000 m2) or 1 square hectometre (hm2) and primarily used in the measurement of land as a metric replacement for the imperial acre.[1] An acre is about 0.405 hectare and one hectare contains about 2.47 acres. In 1795, when the metric system was introduced, the "are" was defined as 100 square metres and the hectare ("hecto-" + "are") was thus 100 "ares" or ​1⁄100 km2. When the metric system was further rationalised in 1960, resulting in the International System of Units (SI), the are was not included as a recognised unit
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Saint-Jude, Quebec
Saint-Jude is a municipality in southwestern Quebec, Canada
Canada
in the Regional County Municipality of Les Maskoutains
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Earthworks (engineering)
Earthworks are engineering works created through the processing of parts of the earth's surface involving quantities of soil or unformed rock.Contents1 Types of excavation 2 Civil engineering use 3 Military use 4 Equipment 5 Mass haul planning 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksTypes of excavation[edit]Earth moving equipment (circa 1922)Flattened and leveled construction site
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Headward Erosion
Headward erosion
Headward erosion
is erosion at the origin of a stream channel, which causes the origin to move back away from the direction of the stream flow, and so causes the stream channel to lengthen.[1] It can also refer to widening of a canyon by erosion along its very top edge, when sheets of water first enter the canyon from a more roughly planar surface above it, such as at Canyonlands National Park
Canyonlands National Park
in Utah. (See image at right.) When sheets of water on a roughly planar surface first enter a depression in it, this erodes the top edge of the depression. This either causes the stream to grow longer at the very top of the stream, which moves its origin back, or causes the canyon formed by the stream to grow wider, by erosion along the length of its top side edge as sheets of water flow over the edge
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Ontario
Ontario
Ontario
(/ɒnˈtɛərioʊ/ ( listen); French: [ɔ̃taʁjo]) is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada
Canada
and is located in east-central Canada.[7][8] It is Canada's most populous province[9] accounting for nearly 40 percent[10] of the country's population, and is the second-largest province in total area
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Highway 416 (Ontario)
King's Highway 416, commonly referred to as Highway 416 and as the Veterans Memorial Highway, is a 400-series highway
400-series highway
in the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
that connects the Trans-Canada Highway (Highway 417) in Ottawa
Ottawa
with Highway 401 between Brockville and Cornwall. The 76.4-kilometre-long (47.5 mi) freeway acts as an important trade corridor from Interstate 81
Interstate 81
between New York and Eastern Ontario
Ontario
via Highway 401, as well as the fastest link between Ottawa
Ottawa
and Toronto. Highway 416 passes through a largely rural area, except near its northern terminus where it enters the suburbs of Ottawa
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Polystyrene
Polystyrene
Polystyrene
(PS) /ˌpɒliˈstaɪriːn/ is a synthetic aromatic polymer made from the monomer styrene. Polystyrene
Polystyrene
can be solid or foamed. General-purpose polystyrene is clear, hard, and rather brittle. It is an inexpensive resin per unit weight. It is a rather poor barrier to oxygen and water vapour and has a relatively low melting point.[5] Polystyrene
Polystyrene
is one of the most widely used plastics, the scale of its production being several million tonnes per year.[6] Polystyrene
Polystyrene
can be naturally transparent, but can be coloured with colourants
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Du Lièvre River
The Le Lièvre River (Rivière du Lièvre in French; French pronunciation: ​[ʁivjɛʁ dy ljɛvʁ]) is a river in western Quebec
Quebec
which flows south from the Mitchinamécus reservoir and empties into the Ottawa River
Ottawa River
at Masson-Angers. The river is 330 kilometres (210 mi) long and drains an area of 10,400 square kilometres (4,000 sq mi). The river's name comes from the French word for hare. The 1908 landslide at Notre-Dame-de-la-Salette and the earlier 1903 clay landslide at Leda both occurred on this river. At one time, the river was used to transport logs downstream to sawmills located near the river's mouth. In 1928, a paper mill was built near the mouth of the river. On December 18, 1998, this mill was bought from Industries James Maclaren Inc. by private investors and became Papier Masson Ltee
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Wick Drain
The basic philosophy behind geocomposite materials is to combine the best features of different materials in such a way that specific applications are addressed in the optimal manner and at minimum cost. Thus, the benefit/cost ratio is maximized. Such geocomposites will generally be geosynthetic materials, but not always. In some cases it may be more advantageous to use a nonsynthetic material with a geosynthetic one for optimum performance and/or least cost
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Groundwater
Groundwater
Groundwater
is the water present beneath Earth's surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of rock formations. A unit of rock or an unconsolidated deposit is called an aquifer when it can yield a usable quantity of water. The depth at which soil pore spaces or fractures and voids in rock become completely saturated with water is called the water table. Groundwater
Groundwater
is recharged from, and eventually flows to, the surface naturally; natural discharge often occurs at springs and seeps, and can form oases or wetlands. Groundwater
Groundwater
is also often withdrawn for agricultural, municipal, and industrial use by constructing and operating extraction wells
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The Globe And Mail
The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
is a Canadian newspaper printed in five cities in western and central Canada. With a weekly readership of 2,018,923 in 2015, it is Canada's most widely read newspaper on weekdays and Saturdays,[3] although it falls slightly behind the Toronto
Toronto
Star in overall weekly circulation because the Star publishes a Sunday edition while the Globe does not
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