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Queen Gwendolen
Queen Gwendolen, also known as Gwendolin, or Gwendolyn (Latin: Guendoloēna) was a legendary ruler of ancient Britain. She is said to have been queen during the 11th century BC. As told by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his pseudohistorical account Historia Regum Britanniae, she was the repudiated queen of King Locrinus until she defeated her husband in battle at the River Stour. This river was the dividing line between Cornwall
Cornwall
and Loegria, two key locations in ancient Britain. After defeating the king, she took on the leadership of the Britons, becoming their first queen regnant. Life[edit] According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Gwendolen was one of the daughters of Corineus, king of Cornwall, and one of Brutus's warriors. Gwendolen was married to Locrinus, the eldest of King Brutus' three sons, and had a son named Maddan
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Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons. Politically, the island is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and constitutes most of its territory.[10] Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island
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Alba Longa
Alba Longa
Alba Longa
(occasionally written Albalonga in Italian sources) was an ancient city of Latium[1] in central Italy, 19 kilometres (12 mi) southeast of Rome,[2] in the Alban Hills. Founder and head of the Latin League, it was destroyed by Rome
Rome
around the middle of the 7th century BC
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Jago Of Britain
Britain
Britain
usually refers to:United Kingdom, a sovereign state Great Britain, an island Britain
Britain
may also refer to:Contents1 Places 2 History 3 People 4 Vehicles 5 Other uses 6 See alsoPlaces[edit]<
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Alba
Alba
Alba
is the Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
name (pronounced [ˈal̪ˠapə]) for Scotland. It is cognate with the Irish term Alba
Alba
(gen. Albann, dat. Albainn) and the Manx term Nalbin, the two other Goidelic Insular Celtic languages, as well as contemporary words used in Cornish (Alban) and Welsh (Yr Alban), both of which are Brythonic Insular Celtic languages. (The third surviving Brythonic language, Breton, instead uses Bro-Skos, meaning 'country of the Scots'.) In the past these terms were names for Great Britain
Great Britain
as a whole, related to the Brythonic name Albion.Contents1 Etymology 2 Modern uses 3 See also 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The term first appears in classical texts as Ἀλβίων Albíon or Ἀλουΐων Alouíon (in Ptolemy's writings in Greek), and later as Albion
Albion
in Latin
Latin
documents
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Cambria
Cambria is a name for Wales, being the Latinised form of the Welsh name for the country, Cymru.[1] The term was not in use during the Roman period (when Wales
Wales
had not come into existence as a distinct entity). It emerged later, in the medieval period, after the Anglo-Saxon settlement of much of Britain led to a territorial distinction between the new Anglo-Saxon kingdoms (which would become England) and the remaining Celtic British kingdoms (which would become Wales)
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William Blake
William Blake
Blake
(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake
Blake
is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age
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Mythopoeia
Mythopoeia
Mythopoeia
(also mythopoesis, after Hellenistic Greek μυθοποιία, μυθοποίησις "myth-making") is a narrative genre in modern literature and film where a fictional or artificial mythology is created by the writer of prose or other fiction. This meaning of the word mythopoeia follows its use by J. R. R. Tolkien in the 1930s.[citation needed] The authors in this genre integrate traditional mythological themes and archetypes into fiction.Contents1 Introduction and definition 2 Etymology 3 The place in society 4 Critics of the genre 5 In literature5.1 Lord Dunsany 5.2 J. R. R. Tolkien 5.3 C. S. Lewis 5.4 William Blake 5.5 Collaborative efforts 5.6 Other modern literature6 Modern usage 7 In music 8 Organizations 9 See also 10 References 11 Bibliography 12 External linksIntroduction and definition[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources
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The Faerie Queene
The Faerie Queene
The Faerie Queene
is an English epic poem by Edmund Spenser. Books I to III were first published in 1590, and then republished in 1596 together with books IV to VI. The Faerie Queene
The Faerie Queene
is notable for its form: it is one of the longest poems in the English language and the origin of a verse form that came to be known as Spenserian stanza.[1] On a literal level, the poem follows several knights in an examination of several virtues, though it is primarily an allegorical work, and can be read on several levels of allegory, including as praise (or, later, criticism) of Queen Elizabeth I
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Homer
Homer
Homer
(/ˈhoʊmər/; Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature. The Iliad
Iliad
is set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy
Troy
by a coalition of Greek kingdoms. It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon
Agamemnon
and the warrior Achilles
Achilles
lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war. The Odyssey
Odyssey
focuses on the journey home of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy. Many accounts of Homer's life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia
Anatolia
in present-day Turkey
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Visions Of The Daughters Of Albion
Visions of the Daughters of Albion is a 1793 poem by William Blake, produced as a book with his own illustrations. It is a short and early example of his prophetic books, and a sequel of sorts to The Book of Thel.Frontispiece to William Blake's Visions of the Daughters of Albion (1793), which contains Blake's critique of Judeo-Christian values of marriage.Contents1 Plot 2 Symbolism 3 Trivia 4 Notes 5 External linksPlot[edit] The central narrative is of the female character Oothoon, called the "soft soul of America", and of her sexual experience. S. Foster Damon (A Blake Dictionary) suggested that Blake had been influenced by Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, published in 1792. Oothoon is in love with Theotormon, who represents the chaste man, filled with a false sense of righteousness. Oothoon desires Theotormon but is suddenly, violently raped by Bromion
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Aeneas Silvius
Aeneas Silvius (said to have reigned 1110-1079 BC)[1] is the son of Silvius, in some versions grandson of Ascanius and great-grandson, grandson or son of Aeneas. He is the third in the list of the mythical kings of Alba Longa in Latium, and the Silvii regarded him as the founder of their house.[2] Dionysius of Halicarnassus[3] ascribes to him a reign of 31 years.[4] Ovid does not mention him among the Alban kings.[5] According to Livy and Dionysius the heir of Aeneas Silvius was named Latinus Silvius. Family tree[edit]v t eFamily tree of the Latin kings of Alba LongaAnchisesVenusLatinusCreusaAeneasLaviniaAscanius or IulusSilviusSilviusAeneas SilviusBrutus of BritainLatinus SilviusAlba SilviusAtysCapysCapetus SilviusTiberinus SilviusAgrippaRomulus SilviusAventinusProcasNumitorAmuliusRhea SilviaAres/MarsHersiliaRomulusRemusKings of RomeReferences[edit]^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus Roman Antiquities 1.71 ^ Livy, i
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Cornwall
Cornwall (/ˈkɔːrnwɔːl, -wəl/;[1] Cornish: Kernow [ˈkɛrnɔʊ]) is a county in South West England in the United Kingdom. The county is bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea,[2] to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar which forms most of the border between them. Cornwall forms the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great Britain. The furthest southwestern point of the island is Land's End; the southernmost point is Lizard Point. Cornwall has a population of 556,000 and covers an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi).[3][4][5][6] The county has been administered since 2009 by the unitary authority, Cornwall Council. The ceremonial county of Cornwall also includes the Isles of Scilly, which are administered separately
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Judaea
The Roman province
Roman province
of Judea
Judea
(Hebrew: יהודה‎, Standard Yehuda Tiberian Yehûḏāh; Arabic: يهودا‎; Greek: Ἰουδαία Ioudaia; Latin: Iūdaea), sometimes spelled in its original Latin forms of Iudæa or Iudaea to distinguish it from the geographical region of Judea, incorporated the regions of Judea, Samaria
Samaria
and Idumea, and extended over parts of the former regions of the Hasmonean and Herodian kingdoms of Israel. It was named after Herod Archelaus's Tetrarchy of Judea, but the Roman province
Roman province
encompassed a much larger territory
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River Stour, Dorset
The River
River
Stour is a 61 mi (98 km) river[1][2][3][4][5] which flows through Wiltshire
Wiltshire
and Dorset
Dorset
in southern England, and drains into the English Channel
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