HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Quarff
Quarff
Quarff
is a small village in the Shetland
Shetland
Islands in Scotland. It is located on the main A970 road, 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Shetland's only town, Lerwick. The village is spread along a classic glacial valley[1] that runs east-west across the island between high hills to north and south,[2] with centres of population at Easter Quarff
Quarff
which is near the main road and the east coast, and Wester Quarff
Quarff
which is 1½ miles west and faces the Atlantic Ocean.[3] A narrow road runs along the valley between the two.Contents1 History 2 Population 3 Infrastructure 4 Quarff
Quarff
church 5 Education 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] In Old Norse, the word Quarff
Quarff
means "the portage"
[...More...]

"Quarff" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Oil Platform
An oil platform, offshore platform, or offshore drilling is a mechanical process where a wellbore is drilled below the seabed using a large structure with facilities for well drilling to explore, extract, store, process petroleum and natural gas which lies in rock formations beneath the seabed. In many cases, the platform contains facilities to house the workforce as well. Most commonly, the term is used to describe drilling activities on the continental shelf, though the term can also be applied to drilling in lakes, inshore waters and inland seas. Depending on the circumstances,[1] the platform may be fixed to the ocean floor, may consist of an artificial island, or may float. Remote subsea wells may also be connected to a platform by flow lines and by umbilical connections
[...More...]

"Oil Platform" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Croft (land)
A croft is a fenced or enclosed area of land, usually small and arable, usually, but not always, with a crofter's dwelling thereon. A crofter is one who has tenure and use of the land, typically as a tenant farmer, especially in rural areas.Contents1 Etymology 2 Legislation 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEtymology[edit] The word croft is West Germanic in etymology[1] and is now most familiar in Scotland, most crofts being in the Highlands and Islands area. Elsewhere the expression is generally archaic
[...More...]

"Croft (land)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

List Of Places In Scotland
This List of places in Scotland
Scotland
is a complete collection of lists of places in Scotland.List of burghs in Scotland List of census localities in Scotland List of islands of ScotlandList of Shetland islands List of Orkney islands List of Inner Hebrides List of Outer Hebrides List of outlying islands of Scotland List of freshwater islands in ScotlandList of rivers of Scotland List of lochs in Scotland Waterfalls of Scotland List of Munros Extreme points of ScotlandLists of places within Scottish local authorities[edit]List of places in Aberdeen Li
[...More...]

"List Of Places In Scotland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Old Norse
Old Norse
Old Norse
was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and inhabitants of their overseas settlements during about the 9th to 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language
Proto-Norse language
developed into Old Norse
Old Norse
by the 8th century, and Old Norse
Old Norse
began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse
Old Norse
is found well into the 15th century.[2] Old Norse
Old Norse
was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them
[...More...]

"Old Norse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Portage
Portage
Portage
or portaging is the practice of carrying water craft or cargo over land, either around an obstacle in a river, or between two bodies of water. A place where this carrying occurs is also called a portage. Early French explorers in New France
New France
and French Louisiana encountered many rapids and cascades. The Native Americans carried their canoes over land to avoid river obstacles. Over time, important portages were sometimes provided with canals with locks, and even portage railways. Primitive portaging generally involves carrying the vessel and its contents across the portage in multiple trips. Small canoes can be portaged by carrying them inverted over one's shoulders and the center strut may be designed in the style of a yoke to facilitate this
[...More...]

"Portage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sir John Sinclair, 1st Baronet
Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, 1st Baronet
Baronet
(10 May 1754 – 21 December 1835) was a Scottish politician, writer on finance and agriculture and the first person to use the word statistics in the English language, in his vast, pioneering work, Statistical Account of Scotland, in 21 volumes. Sinclair was the eldest son of George Sinclair of Ulbster, a member of the family of the Earls of Caithness, and was born at Thurso Castle, Caithness. After studying at the universities of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
and Glasgow and at Trinity College, Oxford, he was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in Scotland, and called to the English bar, though he never practised. In 1780, he was returned to the House of Commons for the Caithness constituency, and subsequently represented several English constituencies, his parliamentary career extending, with few interruptions, until 1811
[...More...]

"Sir John Sinclair, 1st Baronet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cod
Cod
Cod
is the common name for the genus Gadus
Gadus
of demersal fishes, belonging to the family Gadidae.[1] Cod
Cod
is also used as part of the common name for a number of other fish species, and some species suggested to belong to genus Gadus
Gadus
are not called cod (the Alaska pollock). The two most common species of cod are the Atlantic cod
Atlantic cod
(Gadus morhua), which lives in the colder waters and deeper sea regions throughout the North Atlantic, and the Pacific cod
Pacific cod
(Gadus macrocephalus), found in both eastern and western regions of the northern Pacific. Gadus
Gadus
morhua was named by Linnaeus
Linnaeus
in 1758. (However, G
[...More...]

"Cod" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Common Ling
The common ling ( Molva
Molva
molva) or simply the ling, is a large member of a family of cod-like fishes. An ocean fish whose habitat is in the Atlantic
Atlantic
region and can be found around Iceland, Faroe Islands, British Isles, the Norse coast and occasionally around Newfoundland and as far east as Miramichi Bay
Miramichi Bay
in New Brunswick, the ling has a long slender body that can reach 2 metres in length; in adulthood, it is generally a deep-running fish, spending much of its life at depths of 100 m or more; younger fish are found at shallower depths. The ling is edible; it can be considered interchangeable with cod in either its fresh, salted, or dried forms
[...More...]

"Common Ling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Herring
Herring
Herring
are forage fish, mostly belonging to the family Clupeidae. Herring
Herring
often move in large schools around fishing banks and near the coast. The most abundant and commercially important species belong to the genus Clupea, found particularly in shallow, temperate waters of the North Pacific and the North Atlantic Oceans, including the Baltic Sea, as well as off the west coast of South America. Three species of Clupea
Clupea
are recognised, and provide about 90% of all herrings captured in fisheries. Most abundant of all is the Atlantic herring, providing over half of all herring capture
[...More...]

"Herring" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Stone Age
PaleolithicLower Paleolithic Late Stone AgeHomo Control of fire Stone toolsMiddle Paleolithic Middle Stone Age Homo
Homo
neanderthalensis Homo
Homo
sapiens Recent African origin of modern humansUpper Paleolithic Late Stone AgeBehavioral modernity, Atlatl, Origin of the domestic dogEpipaleolithic MesolithicMicroliths, Bow, CanoeNatufian Khiamian Tahunian Heavy Neolithic Shepherd Neolithic Trihedral Neolithic Pre- Pottery
Pottery
NeolithicNeolithic Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution, Domestication Pottery
Pottery
NeolithicPottery↓ Chalcolithicv t eThe Stone Age
Stone Age
was a broad prehistoric period during which stone was widely used to make implements with an edge, a point, or a percussion surface
[...More...]

"Stone Age" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Septic Tank
A septic tank is a chamber made of concrete, fiberglass, PVC or plastic, through which domestic wastewater (sewage) flows for primary treatment.[1] Settling and anaerobic processes reduce solids and organics, but the treatment is only moderate.[1] Septic tank
Septic tank
systems are a type of onsite sewage facility (OSSF). They can be used in areas that are not connected to a sewerage system, such as rural areas. The treated liquid effluent is commonly disposed in a septic drain field which provides further treatment. However, groundwater pollution may occur and can be a problem. The term "septic" refers to the anaerobic bacterial environment that develops in the tank which decomposes or mineralizes the waste discharged into the tank
[...More...]

"Septic Tank" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
[...More...]

"Ordnance Survey National Grid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sumburgh Airport
Sumburgh Airport
Airport
(IATA: LSI, ICAO: EGPB) is the main airport serving Shetland
Shetland
in Scotland. It is located on the southern tip of the mainland, in the parish of Dunrossness, 17 NM (31 km; 20 mi) south of Lerwick.[1] The airport is owned by Highlands and Islands Airports Limited (HIAL) and served by Loganair. On 1 April 1995, ownership of the Company transferred from the UK Civil Aviation Authority to the Secretary of State for Scotland
Scotland
and subsequently to the Scottish Ministers
[...More...]

"Sumburgh Airport" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thomas Telford
Thomas Telford
Telford
FRS, FRSE (9 August 1757 – 2 September 1834) was a Scottish civil engineer, architect and stonemason, and a noted road, bridge and canal builder. After establishing himself as an engineer of road and canal projects in Shropshire, he designed numerous infrastructure projects in his native Scotland, as well as harbours and tunnels
[...More...]

"Thomas Telford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.