HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Puy
Puy
Puy
(French pronunciation: ​[pɥi]) is a geological term used locally in the Auvergne, France
France
for a volcanic hill. The word derives from the Provençal puech, meaning an isolated hill, coming from Latin podium, which has given also puig in Catalan, poggio in Italian, poio in Galician and Portuguese. Most of the puys of central France
France
are small cinder cones, with or without associated lava, whilst others are domes of trachytic rock, like the domite of the Puy-de-Dôme. The puys may be scattered as isolated hills, or, as is more usual, clustered together, sometimes in lines
[...More...]

picture info

Bay Of Naples
The Gulf of Naples
Naples
(Italian: Golfo di Napoli; Neapolitan: Gurfo 'e Napule; Latin: Crater), also called the Bay of Naples, is a roughly 15-kilometer-wide (9.3 mi) gulf located along the south-western coast of Italy
Italy
(province of Naples, Campania
Campania
region). It opens to the west into the Mediterranean Sea. It is bordered on the north by the cities of Naples
Naples
and Pozzuoli, on the east by Mount Vesuvius, and on the south by the Sorrentine Peninsula
Sorrentine Peninsula
and the main town of the peninsula, Sorrento
[...More...]

picture info

Eifel
The Eifel
Eifel
(German: [ˈʔaɪfl̩] ( listen); Luxembourgish: Äifel) is a low mountain range in western Germany
Germany
and eastern Belgium
[...More...]

picture info

Tuff
Tuff
Tuff
(from the Italian tufo) is a type of rock made of volcanic ash ejected from a vent during a volcanic eruption. Following ejection and deposition, the ash is compacted into a solid rock in a process called consolidation. Tuff
Tuff
is sometimes erroneously called "tufa", particularly when used as construction material, but properly speaking tufa is a limestone precipitated from groundwater. Rock that contains greater than 50% tuff is considered tuffaceous. Tuff
Tuff
is a relatively soft rock, so it has been used for construction since ancient times. Since it is common in Italy
Italy
the Romans used it often for construction. The Rapa Nui
Rapa Nui
people used it to make most of the moai statues in Easter Island. Tuff
Tuff
can be classified as either sedimentary or igneous rocks
[...More...]

picture info

Denudation
In geology, denudation involves the processes that cause the wearing away of the Earth's surface by moving water, by ice, by wind and by waves, leading to a reduction in elevation and in relief of landforms and of landscapes. Endogenous processes such as volcanoes, earthquakes, and plate tectonics uplift and expose continental crust to the exogenous processes of weathering, of erosion, and of mass wasting.Contents1 Processes 2 Rates 3 Proposed cycles 4 Volcanic landforms 5 ReferencesProcesses[edit] Denudation
Denudation
incorporates the mechanical, biological and chemical processes of erosion, weathering and mass wasting
[...More...]

picture info

Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
[...More...]

picture info

Permian
The Permian
Permian
is a geologic period and system which spans 47 million years from the end of the Carboniferous
Carboniferous
Period 298.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Triassic
Triassic
period 251.902 Mya. It is the last period of the Paleozoic
Paleozoic
era; the following Triassic
Triassic
period belongs to the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
era. The concept of the Permian
Permian
was introduced in 1841 by geologist Sir Roderick Murchison, who named it after the city of Perm. The Permian
Permian
witnessed the diversification of the early amniotes into the ancestral groups of the mammals, turtles, lepidosaurs, and archosaurs. The world at the time was dominated by two continents known as Pangaea
Pangaea
and Siberia, surrounded by a global ocean called Panthalassa
[...More...]

picture info

Carboniferous
The Carboniferous
Carboniferous
is a geologic period and system that spans 60 million years from the end of the Devonian
Devonian
Period 358.9 million years ago (Mya), to the beginning of the Permian
Permian
Period, 298.9 Mya
[...More...]

picture info

Archibald Geikie
Sir Archibald Geikie
Archibald Geikie
OM KCB PRS FRSE (28 December 1835 – 10 November 1924), was a Scottish geologist and writer.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Geological Survey 4 Writings 5 Honours and awards 6 Death 7 Selected bibliography 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Geikie was born in Edinburgh
Edinburgh
in 1835, the eldest son of musician and music critic James Stuart Geikie and his wife Isabella Thom. The elder brother of James Geikie, he was educated at Edinburgh
Edinburgh
High School and University of Edinburgh. Career[edit] In 1855 was appointed an assistant on the British Geological Survey. Wielding the pen with no less facility than the hammer, he inaugurated his long list of works with The Story of a Boulder; or, Gleanings from the Note-Book of a Geologist (1858)
[...More...]

picture info

Wilhelm Von Branca
Carl Wilhelm Franz von Branca Until 1895: Wilhelm Branco; 1895-1907: Wilhelm von Branco (9 September 1844 – 12 March 1928) was a German geologist and paleontologist. Biography[edit] Von Branca was born in Potsdam. After having been an officer, and then a farmer, Branca studied geology in Halle and Heidelberg, receiving his doctorate in 1876. He did postdoctoral work in Straßburg, Berlin, Munich, and in Rome
Rome
with Karl Alfred von Zittel. In 1881 he received his habilitation from the Friedrich-Wilhelms-University Berlin
Berlin
(today's Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin), where he then worked as a lecturer. After a short stint as a lecturer in Aachen, von Branca became State Geologist
Geologist
at the Prussian Geological State Service in Berlin
[...More...]

picture info

Württemberg
Württemberg
Württemberg
is a historical German territory. Together with Baden
Baden
and Hohenzollern, two other historical territories, it now forms the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg
[...More...]

picture info

Swabian Alps
The Swabian Jura
Swabian Jura
( Schwäbische Alb (help·info), more rarely:  Schwäbischer Jura (help·info)), sometimes also named Swabian Alps
Alps
in English, is a mountain range in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, extending 220 km (140 mi) from southwest to northeast and 40 to 70 km (25 to 43 mi) in width. It is named after the region of Swabia. The Swabian Jura
Swabian Jura
occupies the region bounded by the Danube
Danube
in the southeast and the upper Neckar
Neckar
in the northwest. In the southwest it rises to the higher mountains of the Black Forest. The highest mountain of the region is the Lemberg (1,015 m (3,330 ft)). The area's profile resembles a high plateau, which slowly falls away to the southeast
[...More...]

picture info

Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition (1910–11), is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

Public Domain
The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply
[...More...]

picture info

Trachyte
Trachyte
Trachyte
is an igneous volcanic rock with an aphanitic to porphyritic texture. It is the volcanic equivalent of syenite. The mineral assemblage consists of essential alkali feldspar; relatively minor plagioclase and quartz or a feldspathoid such as nepheline may also be present. (See the QAPF diagram). Biotite, clinopyroxene and olivine are common accessory minerals.Contents1 Chemical composition 2 Mineralogy 3 Geographic distribution 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksChemical composition[edit] Chemically, trachyte contains 60 to 65% silica content; less SiO2 than rhyolite and more (Na2O plus K2O) than dacite. These chemical differences are consistent with the position of trachyte in the TAS classification, and they account for the feldspar-rich mineralogy of the rock type. Mineralogy[edit]A polished opal on trachyteTrachytes usually consist mainly of sanidine feldspar
[...More...]