HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Purdue University
Purdue University
Purdue University
is a public research university located in West Lafayette, Indiana
Indiana
and is the flagship campus of the Purdue University system.[5] The university was founded in 1869 after Lafayette businessman John Purdue
John Purdue
donated land and money to establish a college of science, technology, and agriculture in his name.[6] The first classes were held on September 16, 1874, with six instructors and 39 students.[6] The main campus in West Lafayette offers more than 200 majors for undergraduates, over 69 masters and doctoral programs, and professional degrees in pharmacy and veterinary medicine. In addition, Purdue has 18 intercollegiate sports teams and more than 900 student organizations
[...More...]

"Purdue University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Liberal Education
A liberal education is a system or course of education suitable for the cultivation of a free (Latin: liber) human being. It is based on the medieval concept of the liberal arts or, more commonly now, the liberalism of the Age of Enlightenment.[1] It has been described as "a philosophy of education that empowers individuals with broad knowledge and transferable skills, and a stronger sense of values, ethics, and civic engagement ... characterised by challenging encounters with important issues, and more a way of studying than a specific course or field of study" by the Association of American Colleges and Universities.[2] Usually global and pluralistic in scope, it can include a general education curriculum which provides broad exposure to multiple disciplines and learning strategies in addition to in-depth study in at least one academic area. Liberal education was advocated in the 19th century by thinkers such as John Henry Newman, Thomas Huxley, and F. D. Maurice
[...More...]

"Liberal Education" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morrill Land-Grant Acts
The Morrill Land-Grant Acts
Morrill Land-Grant Acts
are United States
United States
statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges in U.S. states
U.S. states
using the proceeds of federal land sales. The Morrill Act of 1862 (7 U.S.C. § 301 et seq.) was enacted during the American Civil War and the Morrill Act of 1890 (the Agricultural College Act of 1890 (26 Stat. 417, 7 U.S.C. § 321 et seq.)) expanded this model.Contents1 Passage of original bill 2 Land-grant colleges 3 Expansion 4 Agricultural experiment stations and cooperative extension service 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPassage of original bill[edit]Justin Smith MorrillFor 20 years prior to the first introduction of the bill in 1857, there was a political movement calling for the creation of agriculture colleges
[...More...]

"Morrill Land-Grant Acts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Student
Foreign students are those who travel to a country different from their own for the purpose of tertiary study.[1]Contents1 National definitions 2 Destinations of foreign students2.1 Popular destinations 2.2 USA 2.3 China2.3.1 Numbers and growth2.3.1.1 By sending continent 2.3.1.2 By sending country 2.3.1.3 Where in China
China
they are2.3.2 Reasons for coming to China 2.3.3 Issues faced by these students2.4 Germany <
[...More...]

"International Student" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Indiana Supreme Court
The Supreme Court of Indiana, established by Article 7 of the Indiana Constitution, is the highest judicial authority in the state of Indiana. Located in Indianapolis, the Court's chambers are in the north wing of the Indiana
Indiana
Statehouse. In December 1816, the Supreme Court of Indiana
Indiana
succeeded the General Court of the Indiana
Indiana
Territory as the state's high court. During its long history the Court heard a number of high-profile cases, including Lasselle v. State (1820). Originally begun as a three-member judicial panel, the Court underwent major reforms in 1852 and 1971, as well as several other reorganizations
[...More...]

"Indiana Supreme Court" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Corliss Steam Engine
A Corliss steam engine
Corliss steam engine
(or Corliss engine) is a steam engine, fitted with rotary valves and with variable valve timing patented in 1849, invented by and named after the American engineer George Henry Corliss of Providence, Rhode Island. Engines fitted with Corliss valve gear offered the best thermal efficiency of any type of stationary steam engine until the refinement of the uniflow steam engine and steam turbine in the 20th century. Corliss engines were generally about 30 percent more fuel efficient than conventional steam engines with fixed cutoff.[1] This increased efficiency made steam power more economical than water power, allowing industrial development away from millponds.[2] Corliss engines were typically used as stationary engines to provide mechanical power to line shafting in factories and mills and to drive dynamos to generate electricity
[...More...]

"Corliss Steam Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lockheed Model 10 Electra
The Lockheed Model 10 Electra
Lockheed Model 10 Electra
is an American twin-engine, all-metal monoplane airliner developed by the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation
in the 1930s to compete with the Boeing 247
Boeing 247
and Douglas DC-2
[...More...]

"Lockheed Model 10 Electra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
(D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition. This level was once called the University Division of the NCAA, in contrast to the lower level College Division; these terms were replaced with numeric divisions in 1973
[...More...]

"NCAA Division I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Germanium
Germanium
Germanium
is a chemical element with symbol Ge and atomic number 32. It is a lustrous, hard, grayish-white metalloid in the carbon group, chemically similar to its group neighbors tin and silicon. Pure germanium is a semiconductor with an appearance similar to elemental silicon. Like silicon, germanium naturally reacts and forms complexes with oxygen in nature. Because it seldom appears in high concentration, germanium was discovered comparatively late in the history of chemistry. Germanium ranks near fiftieth in relative abundance of the elements in the Earth's crust. In 1869, Dmitri Mendeleev
Dmitri Mendeleev
predicted its existence and some of its properties from its position on his periodic table, and called the element ekasilicon. Nearly two decades later, in 1886, Clemens Winkler
Clemens Winkler
found the new element along with silver and sulfur, in a rare mineral called argyrodite
[...More...]

"Germanium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Athletic Nickname
The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States
United States
is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. Typically as a matter of engendering school spirit, the institution either officially or unofficially uses this moniker of the institution's athletic teams also as a nickname to refer to people associated with the institution, especially its current students, but also often its alumni, its faculty, and its administration as well. This practice at the university and college tertiary higher-education level has proven so popular that it extended to the high school secondary-education level in the United States
United States
and in recent years even to the primary-education level as well
[...More...]

"Athletic Nickname" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
[...More...]

"School Colors" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Transistor
A transistor is a semiconductor device used to amplify or switch electronic signals and electrical power. It is composed of semiconductor material usually with at least three terminals for connection to an external circuit. A voltage or current applied to one pair of the transistor's terminals controls the current through another pair of terminals. Because the controlled (output) power can be higher than the controlling (input) power, a transistor can amplify a signal. Today, some transistors are packaged individually, but many more are found embedded in integrated circuits. The transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices, and is ubiquitous in modern electronic systems. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld patented a field-effect transistor in 1926[1] but it was not possible to actually construct a working device at that time
[...More...]

"Transistor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

G.I. Bill
The Serviceman's Readjustment Act of 1944, also known as the G.I. Bill, was a law that provided a range of benefits for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as G.I.s)
[...More...]

"G.I. Bill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Postgraduate Education
Postgraduate
Postgraduate
education, or graduate education in North America, involves learning and studying for academic or professional degrees, academic or professional certificates, academic or professional diplomas, or other qualifications for which a first or bachelor's degree generally is required, and it is normally considered to be part of higher education. In North America, this level is generally referred to as graduate school (or sometimes colloquially as grad school). The organization and structure of postgraduate education varies in different countries, as well as in different institutions within countries
[...More...]

"Postgraduate Education" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Undergraduate Education
Undergraduate education is the post-secondary education previous to the postgraduate education. It includes all the academic programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry level university student is known as an undergraduate, while students of higher degrees are known as graduates
[...More...]

"Undergraduate Education" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Provost (education)
A provost is the senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States
United States
and Canada, the equivalent of a pro-vice-chancellor at some institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland, or a Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at most Australian universities. Additionally, the heads of certain colleges in the UK and Ireland are called provosts; it is, in this sense, the equivalent of a master (or various other titles for the head of the college) at other colleges.Contents1 Duties, role, titles, and selection 2 Other titles and uses 3 History 4 See also 5 Referen
[...More...]

"Provost (education)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.