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Pullman Strike
The Pullman Strike
Pullman Strike
was a nationwide railroad strike in the United States on May 11, 1894, and a turning point for US labor law. It pitted the American Railway Union
American Railway Union
(ARU) against the Pullman Company, the main railroads, and the federal government of the United States under President Grover Cleveland. The strike and boycott shut down much of the nation's freight and passenger traffic west of Detroit, Michigan. The conflict began in Pullman, Chicago, on May 11 when nearly 4,000 factory employees of the Pullman Company
Pullman Company
began a wildcat strike in response to recent reductions in wages. Most factory workers who built Pullman cars lived in the "company town" of Pullman on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois.[1] The industrialist George Pullman
George Pullman
had designed it ostensibly as a model community.[1] Pullman had a diverse work force
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Illinois Army National Guard
The Illinois
Illinois
Army National Guard
Army National Guard
is a component of the United States Army and the United States National Guard. With the Illinois
Illinois
Air National Guard it is part of the Illinois
Illinois
National Guard. National coordination of various state National Guard units are maintained through the National Guard Bureau. The Illinois
Illinois
Army National Guard
Army National Guard
is composed of approximately 10,000 soldiers. Illinois
Illinois
Army National Guard
Army National Guard
units are trained and equipped as part of the United States Army. The same ranks and insignia are used (see United States Army
United States Army
enlisted rank insignia and United States Army officer rank insignia)
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Clarence Darrow
Clarence Seward Darrow (/ˈdæroʊ/; April 18, 1857 – March 13, 1938) was an American lawyer, a leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, and a prominent advocate for Georgist
Georgist
economic reform. He defended high-profile clients in many famous trials of the early 20th century, including teenage thrill killers Leopold and Loeb for murdering 14-year-old Robert "Bobby" Franks (1924); teacher John T. Scopes in the Scopes "Monkey" Trial (1925), in which he opposed statesman and orator William Jennings Bryan; and Ossian Sweet
Ossian Sweet
in a racially-charged self-defense case (1926)
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Panic Of 1893
The Panic of 1893
Panic of 1893
was a serious economic depression in the United States that began in 1893 and ended in 1897.[1] It deeply affected every sector of the economy, and produced political upheaval that led to the realigning election of 1896 and the presidency of William McKinley.Contents1 Causes 2 Populists 3 Silver 4 Effects 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading7.1 Contemporary sources 7.2 Secondary sources8 External linksCauses[edit] One of the causes for the Panic of 1893
Panic of 1893
can be traced back to Argentina. Investment was encouraged by the Argentine agent bank, Baring Brothers. However, the 1890 wheat crop failure and a coup in Buenos Aires ended further investments. Because European investors were concerned that these problems might spread, they started a run on gold in the U.S. Treasury
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Strikebreaker
A strikebreaker (sometimes derogatorily called a scab, blackleg, or knobstick) is a person who works despite an ongoing strike. Strikebreakers are usually individuals who are not employed by the company prior to the trade union dispute, but rather hired after or during the strike to keep the organization running. "Strikebreakers" may also refer to workers (union members or not) who cross picket lines to work. The use of strikebreakers is a worldwide phenomenon; however, many countries have passed laws outlawing their use as they undermine the collective bargaining process
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African American
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era New Great MigrationCultureStudies Art Business history Black conductors Black mecca Black sc
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Blue Island, Illinois
Blue Island is a city in Cook County, Illinois, located approximately 16 miles (26 km) south of Chicago's Loop.[3] Blue Island is adjacent to the city of Chicago
Chicago
and shares its northern boundary with that city's Morgan Park neighborhood. The population was 23,706 at the 2010 United States
United States
Census. Blue Island was established in the 1830s as a way station for settlers traveling on the Vincennes Trace,[4] and the settlement prospered because it was conveniently situated a day's journey outside of Chicago. The late-nineteenth-century historian and publisher Alfred T. Andreas made the following observation regarding the appearance of the young community in History of Cook County Illinois
Illinois
(1884), "The location of Blue Island Village is a beautiful one
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Frederic Remington
Frederic Sackrider Remington (October 4, 1861 – December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the American Old West, specifically concentrating on scenes from the last quarter of the 19th century in the Western United States
Western United States
and featuring images of cowboys, American Indians, and the U.S
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Chicago, Burlington And Quincy Railroad
The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad
(reporting mark CBQ) was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States. Commonly referred to as the Burlington or as the Q,[1][2] the Burlington Route served a large area, including extensive trackage in the states of Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and also in New Mexico
New Mexico
and Texas
Texas
through subsidiaries Colorado
Colorado
and Southern Railway, Fort Worth and Denver Railway, and Burlington-Rock Island Railroad.[citation needed] Its primary connections included Chicago, Minneapolis-St. Paul, St. Louis, Kansas
Kansas
City and Denver. Because of this extensive trackage in the midwest and mountain states, the railroad used the advertising slogans "Everywhere West", "Way of the Zephyrs", and "The Way West"
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Samuel Gompers
Samuel Gompers
Samuel Gompers
[1] (January 27, 1850 – December 13, 1924) was an English-born American labor union leader and a key figure in American labor history. Gompers founded the American Federation of Labor (AFL), and served as the organization's president from 1886 to 1894, and from 1895 until his death in 1924. He promoted harmony among the different craft unions that comprised the AFL, trying to minimize jurisdictional battles. He promoted thorough organization and collective bargaining, to secure shorter hours and higher wages, the first essential steps, he believed, to emancipating labor. He also encouraged the AFL to take political action to "elect their friends" and "defeat their enemies". He mostly supported Democrats, but sometimes Republicans. He strongly opposed Socialists
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United States Marshal
The United States
United States
Marshals Service (USMS) is a federal law enforcement agency within the U.S. Department of Justice (28 U.S.C. § 561). It is the oldest American federal law enforcement agency and was created by the Judiciary Act of 1789
Judiciary Act of 1789
during the presidency of George Washington
George Washington
as the Office of the United States Marshal.[3] The USMS as it stands today was established in 1969 to provide guidance and assistance to Marshals throughout the federal judicial districts
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Brigadier General (United States)
In the United States Armed Forces, brigadier general (BG, BGen, or Brig Gen) is a one-star general officer with the pay grade of O-7 in the U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and U.S. Air Force. Brigadier general ranks above a colonel and below major general. The rank of brigadier general is equivalent to the rank of rear admiral (lower half) in the other uniformed services (the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, as both Armed Forces and Uniformed Services; and the Public Health Service and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, as Uniformed Services). The NATO
NATO
equivalent is OF-6.Contents1 History 2 Statutory limits 3 Promotion, appointment and tour length 4 Retirement 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The rank of brigadier general has existed in the U.S. military since the inception of the Continental Army
Continental Army
in June 1775
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Pullman, Chicago
Pullman, one of Chicago's 77 defined community areas, is a neighborhood located on the city's South Side. Twelve miles from the Chicago
Chicago
Loop, Pullman is situated adjacent to Lake Calumet. The area known as Pullman encompasses a much wider area than its two historic areas (the older historic area is often referred to as "Pullman" and is a Chicago
Chicago
Landmark district and a National Monument. The northern annex historic area is usually referred to as "North Pullman"). This article deals with all areas. The development built by the Pullman Company is bounded by 103rd Street on the North, 115th Street on the South, the railroad tracks on the East and Cottage Grove on the West. Since the late 20th century, the Pullman neighborhood has been gentrifying. Many residents are involved in the restoration of their own homes, and projects throughout the district as a whole
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Sherman Antitrust Act
The Sherman Antitrust
Antitrust
Act (Sherman Act,[1] 26 Stat. 209, 15 U.S.C. §§ 1–7) is a landmark federal statute in the history of United States antitrust law
United States antitrust law
(or "competition law") passed by Congress in 1890 under the presidency of Benjamin Harrison. It allowed certain business activities that federal government regulators deem to be competitive, and recommended the federal government to investigate and pursue trusts. In the general sense, a trust is a centuries-old legal arrangement whereby one party conveys property to a trustee to hold for a beneficiary. These are commonly used to hold inheritances for the benefit of children, for example
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Billings, Montana
Billings is the largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Montana, and the principal city of the Billings Metropolitan Area
Billings Metropolitan Area
with a population of 183,780.[5] It has a trade area of over half a million people.[6] Billings is located in the south-central portion of the state and is the seat of Yellowstone County, which had a 2018 population of 173,372.[5] The 2018 Census estimates put the Billings population at 111,150,[7] making it the only city in Montana
Montana
with over 100,000 people. The city is experiencing rapid growth and a strong economy; it has had and is continuing to have the largest growth of any city in Montana. Parts of the metro area are seeing hyper growth
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