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Pueblos
The Puebloans
Puebloans
or Pueblo
Pueblo
peoples are Native Americans in the Southwestern United States
Southwestern United States
who share common agricultural, material and religious practices. When Spaniards entered the area beginning in the 16th century, they came across complex, multi-story villages built of adobe, stone and other local materials, which they called pueblos, or towns, a term that later came to refer also to the peoples who live in these villages. There are currently 21 Pueblos that are still inhabited, among which Taos, San Ildefonso, Acoma, Zuni, and Hopi
Hopi
are the best-known
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Pueblo Indians (baseball)
The Pueblo Indians were a minor league baseball team that was located in Pueblo, Colorado
Pueblo, Colorado
and played in the Western League sporadically from 1900–1911. A Pueblo franchise had previously played in the Colorado
Colorado
State League on and off from 1885–1898 and they joined the second Western League when it formed in 1900 but folded that season. The name returned when the Colorado Springs Millionaires moved to town and became the Indians in 1905, and they remained active until 1909. In 1911 the Wichita Jobbers moved to Pueblo and finished out the season as the Indians. This team moved to the Rocky Mountain League in 1912 but quickly moved to Trinidad during the season. External links[edit]Baseball ReferenceThis article about a baseball team in Colorado
Colorado
is a stub
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Tributary
A tributary[1] or affluent[2] is a stream or river that flows into a larger stream or main stem (or parent) river or a lake.[3] A tributary does not flow directly into a sea or ocean.[4] Tributaries and the main stem river drain the surrounding drainage basin of its surface water and groundwater, leading the water out into an ocean. A confluence, where two or more bodies of water meet together, usually refers to the joining of tributaries. The opposite to a tributary is a distributary, a river or stream that branches off from and flows away from the main stream.[5] Distributaries are most often found in river deltas.Contents1 Terminology 2 Ordering and enumeration 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesTerminology[edit]Looking downstream, the Shenandoah River
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Dry Farming
Dryland farming
Dryland farming
and dry farming are agricultural techniques for non-irrigated cultivation of crops
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Language Isolate
A language isolate, in the absolute sense, is a natural language with no demonstrable genealogical (or "genetic") relationship with other languages, one that has not been demonstrated to descend from an ancestor common with any other language. Language isolates are in effect language families consisting of a single language. Commonly cited examples include Ainu, Basque, Korean, Sumerian, and Elamite, though in each case a minority of linguists claim to have demonstrated a relationship with other languages.[1] Some sources use the term "language isolate" to indicate a branch of a larger family with only one surviving daughter. For instance, Albanian, Armenian and Greek are commonly called Indo-European isolates. While part of the Indo-European family, they do not belong to any established branch (such as the Romance, Celtic or Slavic and Germanic branches), but instead form independent branches
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Zuni Language
Zuni /ˈzuːni/ (also formerly Zuñi) is a language of the Zuni people, indigenous to western New Mexico
New Mexico
and eastern Arizona
Arizona
in the United States. It is spoken by around 9,500 people worldwide, especially in the vicinity of Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico, and much smaller numbers in parts of Arizona. Unlike most indigenous languages in the US, Zuni is still spoken by a significant number of children and, thus, is comparatively less threatened with language endangerment. Edmund Ladd reported in 1994 that Zuni is still the main language of communication in the pueblo and is used in the home (Newman 1996). Within the language, the language itself is called Shiwi'ma (shiwi "Zuni" + -’ma "vernacular", trans
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Hopi Language
Hopi
Hopi
(Hopi: Hopílavayi) is a Uto-Aztecan language spoken by the Hopi people (a Pueblo group) of northeastern Arizona, United States, but some Hopi
Hopi
are now monolingual English-speakers. The use of Hopi
Hopi
has gradually declined over the course of the 20th century. In 1990, it was estimated that more than 5,000 people could speak Hopi
Hopi
as a native language (approximately 75% of the population), but only 40 of them were monolingual in Hopi
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Uto-Aztecan
Uto-Aztecan or Uto-Aztekan /ˈjuːtoʊ.æzˈtɛkən/ is a family of Indigenous languages of the Americas. The language family consisting of over 30 languages. Uto- Aztecan languages
Aztecan languages
are found almost entirely in the Western United States
Western United States
and Mexico
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Southern Tiwa
The Southern Tiwa language is a Tanoan language
Tanoan language
spoken at Sandia Pueblo and Isleta Pueblo
Isleta Pueblo
in New Mexico
New Mexico
and Ysleta del Sur
Ysleta del Sur
in Texas.Contents1 Genealogical relations 2 Language variation 3 Sound system 4 Grammar 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksGenealogical relations[edit] Southern Tiwa belongs to the Tiwa sub-grouping of the Kiowa–Tanoan language family. It is closely related to the more northernly Picurís (spoken at Picuris Pueblo) and Taos (spoken at Taos Pueblo). Trager stated that Southern Tiwa speakers were able to understand Taos and Picurís, although Taos and Picurís speakers could not understand Southern Tiwa very easily
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Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico
Tesuque Pueblo is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, United States. Its population was 233 as of the 2010 census.[1] Geography[edit] Tesuque Pueblo is located at 35°48′09″N 105°58′32″W / 35.8025277°N 105.9755777°W / 35.8025277; -105.9755777.[2] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the community has an area of 2.198 square miles (5.69 km2), all of it land.[1] References[edit]^ a b c d "2010 Census Gazetteer Files - Places: New Mexico". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved December 31, 2016.  ^ a b "Tesuque Pueblo". Geographic Names Information System
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Dialect Continuum
A dialect continuum or dialect chain is a spread of language varieties spoken across some geographical area such that neighbouring varieties differ only slightly, but the differences accumulate over distance so that widely separated varieties are not mutually intelligible. That happens, for example, across large parts of India
India
(the Indo-Aryan languages) or the Arab world
Arab world
(Arabic). Historically, it also happened in various parts of Europe
Europe
such as between Portugal, southern Belgium (Wallonia) and southern Italy
Italy
(Western Romance languages) and between Flanders
Flanders
and Austria
Austria
(German dialects). Leonard Bloomfield used the name dialect area.[1] Charles F
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Keresan Languages
Keresan /kəˈriːsən/, also Keres /ˈkɛrɪs/, is a Native American language, spoken by the Keres Pueblo people
Pueblo people
in New Mexico. Depending on analysis, Keresan is considered a small language family or a language isolate with several dialects. The varieties of each of the seven Keres pueblos are mutually intelligible with its closest neighbors
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Syncretism
Syncretism
Syncretism
(/ˈsɪŋkrətɪzəm/) is the combining of different beliefs, while blending practices of various schools of thought. Syncretism
Syncretism
involves the merging or assimilation of several originally discrete traditions, especially in the theology and mythology of religion, thus asserting an underlying unity and allowing for an inclusive approach to other faiths
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Maize
Maize
Maize
(/meɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico[1][2] about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears, which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds. Maize
Maize
has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice. However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol, animal feed and other maize products, such as corn starch and corn syrup
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Language Family
A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family. The term "family" reflects the tree model of language origination in historical linguistics, which makes use of a metaphor comparing languages to people in a biological family tree, or in a subsequent modification, to species in a phylogenetic tree of evolutionary taxonomy. Linguists therefore describe the daughter languages within a language family as being genetically related.[1] According to Ethnologue
Ethnologue
the 7,099 living human languages are distributed in 141 different language families.[2] A "living language" is simply one that is used as the primary form of communication of a group of people
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