HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ptosis (eyelid)
Ptosis (/ˈtoʊsɪs/) is a drooping or falling of the upper eyelid. The drooping may be worse after being awake longer when the individual's muscles are tired. This condition is sometimes called "lazy eye", but that term normally refers to the condition amblyopia. If severe enough and left untreated, the drooping eyelid can cause other conditions, such as amblyopia or astigmatism. This is why it is especially important for this disorder to be treated in children at a young age, before it can interfere with vision development. The term is from Greek πτῶσις "a fall, falling".Contents1 Causes1.1 Drugs2 Classification 3 Pathology 4 Treatment 5 Etymology 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksCauses[edit] Neurotoxic ptosis caused by botulinum toxin: a 14-year-old botulism patient with bilateral total ophthalmoplegia with ptosis (left image) and dilated, fixed pupils (right image)
[...More...]

"Ptosis (eyelid)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Myotonic Dystrophy
Myotonic dystrophy
Myotonic dystrophy
is a long term genetic disorder that affects muscle function.[1] Symptoms include gradually worsening muscle loss and weakness.[1] Muscles often contract and are unable to relax.[1] Other symptoms may include cataracts, intellectual disability and heart conduction problems.[1][2] In men, there may be early balding and an inability to have children.[1] Myotonic dystrophy
[...More...]

"Myotonic Dystrophy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aponeurotic
An aponeurosis (/ˌæpənjuˈroʊsɪs/; plural: aponeuroses) is similar to a broad flat tendon, in the form of a sheet of pearly-white fibrous tissue that attaches sheet-like muscles needing a wide area of attachment.[1] Their primary function is to join muscles and the body parts they act upon, whether it be bone or other muscles.[2][3] They have a shiny, whitish-silvery color, are histologically similar to tendons, and are very sparingly supplied with blood vessels and nerves. When dissected, aponeuroses are papery and peel off by sections
[...More...]

"Aponeurotic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Myogenic
The myogenic mechanism is how arteries and arterioles react to an increase or decrease of blood pressure to keep the blood flow within the blood vessel constant. The smooth muscle of the blood vessels reacts to the stretching of the muscle by opening ion channels, which cause the muscle to depolarize, leading to muscle contraction. This significantly reduces the volume of blood able to pass through the lumen, which reduces blood flow through the blood vessel
[...More...]

"Myogenic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neurotransmitter
Neurotransmitters, also known as chemical messengers, are endogenous chemicals that enable neurotransmission. They transmit signals across a chemical synapse, such as a neuromuscular junction, from one neuron (nerve cell) to another "target" neuron, muscle cell, or gland cell.[1] Neurotransmitters are released from synaptic vesicles in synapses into the synaptic cleft, where they are received by neurotransmitter receptors on the target cells. Many neurotransmitters are synthesized from simple and plentiful precursors such as amino acids, which are readily available from the diet and only require a small number of biosynthetic steps for conversion. Neurotransmitters play a major role in shaping everyday life and functions
[...More...]

"Neurotransmitter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inflammation
Inflammation
Inflammation
(from Latin
Latin
inflammatio) is part of the complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants,[1] and is a protective response involving immune cells, blood vessels, and molecular mediators
[...More...]

"Inflammation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Physical Trauma
Major trauma
Major trauma
is any injury that has the potential to cause prolonged disability or death.[1] There are many causes of major trauma, blunt and penetrating, including falls, motor vehicle collisions, stabbing wounds, and gunshot wounds. Depending on the severity of injury, quickness of management and transportation to an appropriate medical facility (called a trauma center) may be necessary to prevent loss of life or limb. The initial assessment is critical, and involves a physical evaluation and also may include the use of imaging tools to determine the types of injuries accurately and to formulate a course of treatment. In 2002, unintentional and intentional injuries were the fifth and seventh leading causes of deaths worldwide, accounting for 6.23% and 2.84% of all deaths
[...More...]

"Physical Trauma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tumor
Neoplasm
Neoplasm
is an abnormal growth of tissue which, if it forms a mass, is commonly referred to as a tumor.[1][2][3] This abnormal growth (neoplasia) usually (but not always) forms a mass.[4] ICD-10 classifies neoplasms into four main groups: benign neoplasms, in situ neoplasms, malignant neoplasms, and neoplasms of uncertain or unknown behavior.[5] Malignant neoplasms
Malignant neoplasms
are also simply known as cancers and are the focus of oncology. Prior to the abnormal growth of tissue, as neoplasia, cells often undergo an abnormal pattern of growth, such as metaplasia or dysplasia.[6] However, metaplasia or dysplasia does not always progress to neoplasia.[1] The word is from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
νέος- neo "new" and πλάσμα plasma "formation, creation".Contents1 Types1.1 Clonality 1.2 Neoplasia
Neoplasia
vs
[...More...]

"Tumor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Contact Lenses
A contact lens, or simply contact, is a thin lens placed directly on the surface of the eye. Contact lenses are considered medical devices and can be worn to correct vision, or for cosmetic or therapeutic reasons.[1] In 2004, it was estimated that 125 million people worldwide use contact lenses, including 28 to 38 million in the United States.[2] In 2010, the worldwide market for contact lenses was estimated at $6.1 billion, while the US soft lens market was estimated at $2.1 billion.[3] Multiple analysts estimated that the global market for contact lenses would reach $11.7 billion by 2015.[3] As of 2010[update], the average age of contact lens wearers globally was 31 years old, and two-thirds of wearers were female.[4] People choose to wear contact lenses for many reasons.[5] Aesthetics and cosmetics are the main motivating factors for people who want to avoid wearing glasses or to change the appearance of their eyes.[6] Others wear contact lenses for functional or optical reasons
[...More...]

"Contact Lenses" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iris (anatomy)
The iris (plural: irides or irises) is a thin, circular structure in the eye, responsible for controlling the diameter and size of the pupil and thus the amount of light reaching the retina. Eye
Eye
color is defined by that of the iris
[...More...]

"Iris (anatomy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vascular Disease
Vascular disease
Vascular disease
is a class of diseases of the blood vessels – the arteries and veins of the circulatory system of the body. It is a subgroup of cardiovascular disease
[...More...]

"Vascular Disease" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brain Tumor
A brain tumor occurs when abnormal cells form within the brain.[2] There are two main types of tumors: malignant or cancerous tumors and benign tumors.[2] Cancerous
Cancerous
tumors can be divided into primary tumors that start within the brain, and secondary tumors that have spread from somewhere else, known as brain metastasis tumors.[1] All types of brain tumors may produce symptoms that vary depending on the part of the brain involved.[2] These symptoms may include headaches, seizures, problem with vision, vomiting, and mental changes.[1][7][2] The headache is classically worse in the morning and goes away with vomiting.[2] More specific problems may includ
[...More...]

"Brain Tumor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes mellitus
Diabetes mellitus
(DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not produci
[...More...]

"Diabetes Mellitus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nerve
A nerve is an enclosed, cable-like bundle of axons (nerve fibers, the long and slender projections of neurons) in the peripheral nervous system. A nerve provides a common pathway for the electrochemical nerve impulses that are transmitted along each of the axons to peripheral organs. In the central nervous system, the analogous structures are known as tracts.[1][2] Neurons are sometimes called nerve cells, though this term is potentially misleading since many neurons do not form nerves, and nerves also include non-neuronal Schwann cells
Schwann cells
that coat the axons in myelin. Each nerve is a cordlike structure containing bundles of axons. Within a nerve, each axon is surrounded by a layer of connective tissue called the endoneurium. The axons are bundled together into groups called fascicles, and each fascicle is wrapped in a layer of connective tissue called the perineurium
[...More...]

"Nerve" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Neurofibromas
A neurofibroma is a benign nerve-sheath tumor in the peripheral nervous system. In 90% of cases, they are found as stand-alone tumors, while the remainder are found in persons with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1), an autosomal-dominant genetically inherited disease, they can result in a range of symptoms from physical disfiguration and pain to cognitive disability. Neurofibromas arise from nonmyelinating-type Schwann cells that exhibit biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene that codes for the protein neurofibromin.[1] This protein is responsible for regulating the RAS-mediated cell growth signaling pathway
[...More...]

"Neurofibromas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wound Healing
Wound healing is an intricate process in which the skin repairs itself after injury.[1] In this article, wound healing is depicted in a discrete timeline of physical attributes (phases) constituting the post-trauma repairing process. In undamaged skin, the epidermis (surface layer) and dermis (deeper layer) form a protective barrier against the external environment. When the barrier is broken, a regulated sequence of biochemical events is set into motion to repair the damage.[1][2] This process is divided into predictable phases: blood clotting (hemostasis), inflammation, tissue growth (proliferation), and tissue remodeling (maturation). Blood clotting may be considered to be part of the inflammation stage instead of a separate stage.[3]Deep wound on shin with stitches healing over five weeksHemostasis (blood clotting): Within the first few minutes of injury, platelets in the blood begin to stick to the injured site. This activates the platelets, causing a few things to happen
[...More...]

"Wound Healing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.