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Pry (software)
Pry is an interactive shell for the Ruby programming language. It is notable for its Smalltalk-inspired[1] ability to start a REPL within a running program
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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Reflection (computer Science)
In computer science, reflection is the ability of a computer program to examine, introspect, and modify its own structure and behavior at runtime.[1]Contents1 Historical background 2 Uses 3 Implementation 4 Examples4.1 C# 4.2 Delphi 4.3 eC 4.4 ECMAScript 4.5 Go 4.6 Java 4.7 Objective-C 4.8 Perl 4.9 PHP 4.10 Python 4.11 R 4.12 Ruby5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistorical background[edit] The earliest computers were programmed in their native assembly language, which were inherently reflective, as these original architectures could be programmed by defining instructions as data and using self-modifying code
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RubyMine
JetBrains
JetBrains
s.r.o. (formerly IntelliJ Software
Software
s.r.o.) is a software development company whose tools are targeted towards software developers and project managers.[1][2] As of 2017[update], the company has around 700 employees in its six offices in Prague, Saint Petersburg, Moscow, Munich, Boston
Boston
and Novosibirsk.[3][4][5][6] The company offers an extended family of integrated development environments (IDEs) for the programming languages Java, Ruby, Python, PHP, SQL, Objective-C, C++, C#, and JavaScript
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NetBeans
NetBeans
NetBeans
is an integrated development environment (IDE) for Java. NetBeans
NetBeans
allows applications to be developed from a set of modular software components called modules. NetBeans
NetBeans
runs on Microsoft Windows, macOS, Linux
Linux
and Solaris. In addition to Java development, it has extensions for other languages like PHP, C, C++
C++
and HTML5.[3], Javadoc and Javascript. Applications based on NetBeans, including the NetBeans
NetBeans
IDE, can be extended by third party developers.[4] The NetBeans
NetBeans
Team actively supports the product and seeks feature suggestions from the wider community
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ActiveState Komodo
Komodo Edit
Komodo Edit
is a free text editor for dynamic programming languages. It was introduced in January 2007 to complement ActiveState's commercial Komodo IDE. As of version 4.3, Komodo Edit
Komodo Edit
is built atop the Open Komodo project. Many of Komodo's features are derived from an embedded Python interpreter.[2] Open Komodo uses the Mozilla
Mozilla
and Scintilla code base to provide its features, including support for many popular languages (including Python, Perl, PHP, Ruby, Tcl, SQL, Smarty, CSS, HTML, and XML), across all common operating systems (Linux, OS X, and Windows)
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Integrated Development Environment
An integrated development environment (IDE) is a software application that provides comprehensive facilities to computer programmers for software development. An IDE normally consists of a source code editor, build automation tools, and a debugger. Most modern IDEs have intelligent code completion. Some IDEs, such as NetBeans
NetBeans
and Eclipse, contain a compiler, interpreter, or both; others, such as SharpDevelop and Lazarus, do not. The boundary between an integrated development environment and other parts of the broader software development environment is not well-defined. Sometimes a version control system, or various tools to simplify the construction of a graphical user interface (GUI), are integrated
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Programming Language Implementation
A programming language implementation is a system for executing computer programs. There are two general approaches to programming language implementation:Interpretation: An interpreter takes as input a program in some language, and performs the actions written in that language on some machine. Compilation: A compiler takes as input a program in some language, and translates that program into some other language, which may serve as input to another interpreter or another compiler.Notice that a compiler does not directly execute the program. Ultimately, in order to execute a program via compilation, it must be translated into a form that can serve as input to an interpreter or directly to hardware. When a piece of computer hardware can interpret a programming language directly, that language is called machine code. A so-called native code compiler is one that compiles a program into machine code
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Software Release Life Cycle
A software release life cycle is the sum of the stages of development and maturity for a piece of computer software: ranging from its initial development to its eventual release, and including updated versions of the released version to help improve software or fix software bugs still present in the software.Contents1 History 2 Stages of development2.1 Pre-alpha 2.2 Alpha 2.3 Beta2.3.1 Open and closed beta2.4 Release candidate3 Release3.1 Release to manufacturing (RTM) 3.2 General availability (GA) 3.3 Release to web (RTW)4 Support4.1 End-of-life5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyHistory[edit] Usage of the "alpha/beta" test terminology originated at IBM. As long ago as the 1950s (and probably earlier), IBM used similar terminology for their hardware development. "A" test was the verification of a new product before public announcement. "B" test was the verification before releasing the product to be manufactured
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Emacs
Emacs
Emacs
/ˈiːmæks/ is a family of text editors that are characterized by their extensibility.[3] The manual for the most widely used variant,[4] GNU
GNU
Emacs, describes it as "the extensible, customizable, self-documenting, real-time display editor".[5] Development of the first Emacs
Emacs
began in the mid-1970s, and work on its direct descendant, GNU
GNU
Emacs, continues actively as of 2018[update]. Emacs
Emacs
has over 10,000 built-in commands (many of which are macros themselves) and its user interface allows the user to combine these commands into macros to automate work. Implementations of Emacs typically feature a dialect of the Lisp programming language
Lisp programming language
that provides a deep extension capability, allowing users and developers to write new commands and applications for the editor
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Lisp (programming Language)
Lisp (historically, LISP) is a family of computer programming languages with a long history and a distinctive, fully parenthesized prefix notation.[3] Originally specified in 1958, Lisp is the second-oldest high-level programming language in widespread use today. Only Fortran
Fortran
is older, by one year.[4][5] Lisp has changed since its early days, and many dialects have existed over its history. Today, the best known general-purpose Lisp dialects are Common Lisp and Scheme. Lisp was originally created as a practical mathematical notation for computer programs, influenced by the notation of Alonzo Church's lambda calculus. It quickly became the favored programming language for artificial intelligence (AI) research
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SLIME
SLIME, the Superior Lisp Interaction Mode for Emacs, is an Emacs
Emacs
mode for developing Common Lisp applications. SLIME
SLIME
originates in an Emacs mode called SLIM written by Eric Marsden. It is developed as an open-source public domain software[1] project by Luke Gorrie and Helmut Eller. Over 100 Lisp developers have contributed code to SLIME since the project was started in 2003
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Python (programming Language)
Python is an interpreted high-level programming language for general-purpose programming. Created by Guido van Rossum
Guido van Rossum
and first released in 1991, Python has a design philosophy that emphasizes code readability, notably using significant whitespace. It provides constructs that enable clear programming on both small and large scales.[26] Python features a dynamic type system and automatic memory management. It supports multiple programming paradigms, including object-oriented, imperative, functional and procedural, and has a large and comprehensive standard library.[27] Python interpreters are available for many operating systems. CPython, the reference implementation of Python, is open source software[28] and has a community-based development model, as do nearly all of its variant implementations
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IPython
IPython
IPython
is a command shell for interactive computing in multiple programming languages, originally developed for the Python programming language, that offers introspection, rich media, shell syntax, tab completion, and history. IPython
IPython
provides the following features:Interactive shells (terminal and Qt-based). A browser-based notebook with support for code, text, mathematical expressions, inline plots and other media. Support for interactive data visualization and use of GUI toolkits. Flexible, embeddable interpreters to load into one's own projects. Tools for parallel computing.Contents1 Parallel computing 2 Notebook 3 Other features 4 Project Jupyter 5 In the media 6 Grants and awards 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksParallel computing[edit]Architectural View of IPython's parallel machinery IPython
IPython
is based on an architecture that provides parallel and distributed computing
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Comparison Of Computer Shells
A command shell is a command line interface computer program to an operating system.Contents1 General characteristics 2 Interactive features2.1 Background execution 2.2 Completions 2.3 Command history 2.4 Mandatory argument prompt 2.5 Automatic suggestions 2.6 Directory history, stack or similar features 2.7 Implicit directory change 2.8 Autocorrection 2.9 Integrated environment 2.10 Snippets 2.11 Value prompt 2.12 Menu/options selector 2.13 Progress indicator 2.14 Interactive table 2.15 Syntax highlighting 2.16 Context sensitive help 2.17 Command builder3 Programming features 4 String processing and filename matching 5 Inter-process communication5.1 Keystroke stacking6 Security features6.1 Secure prompt 6.2 Encrypted variables/parameters 6.3 Execute permission 6.4 Untrusted script blocking6.4.1 Script origin execution restriction 6.4.2 Signed script restriction 6.4.3 Multilevel execution policies6.5 Restricted shell subset
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Source Code
In computing, source code is any collection of computer instructions, possibly with comments, written using[1] a human-readable programming language, usually as plain text. The source code of a program is specially designed to facilitate the work of computer programmers, who specify the actions to be performed by a computer mostly by writing source code. The source code is often transformed by an assembler or compiler into binary machine code understood by the computer. The machine code might then be stored for execution at a later time. Alternatively, source code may be interpreted and thus immediately executed. Most application software is distributed in a form that includes only executable files
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