HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Prudhoe Bay Oil Field
Prudhoe Bay
Prudhoe Bay
Oil Field is a large oil field on Alaska's North Slope. It is the largest oil field in North America, covering 213,543 acres (86,418 ha) and originally containing approximately 25 billion barrels (4.0×109 m3) of oil.[1] The amount of recoverable oil in the field is more than double that of the next largest field in the United States, the East Texas oil field
[...More...]

"Prudhoe Bay Oil Field" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
[...More...]

"United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Standard Oil Company
Standard Oil
Standard Oil
Co. Inc. was an American oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. Established in 1870 by John D. Rockefeller and Henry Flagler
Henry Flagler
as a corporation in Ohio, it was the largest oil refinery in the world of its time.[7] Its controversial history as one of the world's first and largest multinational corporations ended in 1911, when the United States
United States
Supreme Court ruled that Standard Oil
Standard Oil
was an illegal monopoly. Standard Oil
Standard Oil
dominated the oil products market initially through horizontal integration in the refining sector, then, in later years vertical integration; the company was an innovator in the development of the business trust
[...More...]

"Standard Oil Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stratigraphic Column
A stratigraphic column is a representation used in geology and its subfield of stratigraphy to describe the vertical location of rock units in a particular area. A typical stratigraphic column shows a sequence of sedimentary rocks, with the oldest rocks on the bottom and the youngest on top. In areas that are more geologically complex, such as those that contain intrusive rocks, faults, and/or metamorphism, stratigraphic columns can still indicate the relative locations of these units with respect to one another. However, in these cases, the stratigraphic column must either be a structural column, in which the units are stacked with respect to how they are observed in the field to have been moved by the faults, or a time column, in which the units are stacked in the order in which they were formed. Stratigraphy
Stratigraphy
is a branch of geology that concerns the order and relative position of geologic strata and their relationship to the geologic time scale
[...More...]

"Stratigraphic Column" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anticline
In structural geology, an anticline is a type of fold that is an arch-like shape and has its oldest beds at its core. A typical anticline is convex up in which the hinge or crest is the location where the curvature is greatest, and the limbs are the sides of the fold that dip away from the hinge. Anticlines can be recognized and differentiated from antiforms by a sequence of rock layers that become progressively older toward the center of the fold. Therefore, if age relationships between various rock strata are unknown, the term antiform should be used. The progressing age of the rock strata towards the core and uplifted center, are the trademark indications for evidence of anticlines on a geologic map. These formations occur because anticlinal ridges typically develop above thrust faults during crustal deformations. The uplifted core of the fold causes compression of strata that preferentially erodes to a deeper stratigraphic level relative to the topographically lower flanks
[...More...]

"Anticline" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fault (geology)
In geology, a fault is a planar fracture or discontinuity in a volume of rock, across which there has been significant displacement as a result of rock-mass movement. Large faults within the Earth's crust result from the action of plate tectonic forces, with the largest forming the boundaries between the plates, such as subduction zones or transform faults. Energy release associated with rapid movement on active faults is the cause of most earthquakes. A fault plane is the plane that represents the fracture surface of a fault. A fault trace or fault line is a place where the fault can be seen or mapped on the surface
[...More...]

"Fault (geology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lower Cretaceous
The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
( /krɪˈteɪʃəs/, kri-TAY-shəs) is a geologic period and system that spans 79 million years from the end of the Jurassic
Jurassic
Period 145 million years ago (mya) to the beginning of the Paleogene Period 66 mya. It is the last period of the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era. The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period is usually abbreviated K, for its German translation Kreide (chalk). The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
was a period with a relatively warm climate, resulting in high eustatic sea levels that created numerous shallow inland seas. These oceans and seas were populated with now-extinct marine reptiles, ammonites and rudists, while dinosaurs continued to dominate on land. During this time, new groups of mammals and birds, as well as flowering plants, appeared
[...More...]

"Lower Cretaceous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Unconformity
An unconformity is a buried erosional or non-depositional surface separating two rock masses or strata of different ages, indicating that sediment deposition was not continuous. In general, the older layer was exposed to erosion for an interval of time before deposition of the younger, but the term is used to describe any break in the sedimentary geologic record. The significance of angular unconformity (see below) was shown by James Hutton, who found examples of Hutton's Unconformity
Unconformity
at Jedburgh
Jedburgh
in 1787 and at Siccar Point
Siccar Point
in 1788.[1][2] The rocks above an unconformity are younger than the rocks beneath (unless the sequence has been overturned). An unconformity represents time during which no sediments were preserved in a region. The local record for that time interval is missing and geologists must use other clues to discover that part of the geologic history of that area
[...More...]

"Unconformity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Petroleum Seep
A petroleum seep is a place where natural liquid or gaseous hydrocarbons escape to the earth's atmosphere and surface, normally under low pressure or flow. Seeps generally occur above either terrestrial or offshore petroleum accumulation structures.[1][not in citation given] The hydrocarbons may escape along geological layers, or across them through fractures and fissures in the rock, or directly from an outcrop of oil-bearing rock. Petroleum
Petroleum
seeps are quite common in many areas of the world, and have been exploited by mankind since paleolithic times. Natural products associated with these seeps include bitumen, pitch, asphalt and tar. In locations where seeps of natural gas are sufficiently large, natural "eternal flames" often persist
[...More...]

"Petroleum Seep" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eskimo
Eskimo
Eskimo
is an English term for the indigenous peoples who have traditionally inhabited the northern circumpolar region stretching from eastern Siberia
Siberia
(Russia), across Alaska
Alaska
(of the United States) and Canada, to Greenland.[1] The two main peoples known as "Eskimo" are: (1) the Alaskan Iñupiat
Iñupiat
peoples, Eskimo
Eskimo
Inuit, and the mass-grouping Inuit
Inuit
peoples of Canada, and (2) the Yupik
Yupik
of eastern Siberia
Siberia
and Alaska. The Yupik
Yupik
comprise speakers of four distinct Yupik languages: one used in the Russian Far East
Russian Far East
and the others among people of Western Alaska, Southcentral Alaska
Alaska
and along the Gulf of Alaska
Alaska
coast
[...More...]

"Eskimo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gold
Gold
Gold
is a chemical element with symbol Au (from Latin: aurum) and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold
Gold
often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver (as electrum) and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium
[...More...]

"Gold" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prospecting
Prospecting
Prospecting
is the first stage of the geological analysis (second – exploration) of a territory. It is the physical search for minerals, fossils, precious metals or mineral specimens, and is also known as fossicking. Prospecting
Prospecting
is a small-scale form of mineral exploration which is an organised, large scale effort undertaken by commercial mineral companies to find commercially viable ore deposits. Prospecting
Prospecting
is physical labour, involving traversing (traditionally on foot or on horseback), panning, sifting and outcrop investigation, looking for signs of mineralisation. In some areas a prospector must also make claims, meaning they must erect posts with the appropriate placards on all four corners of a desired land they wish to prospect and register this claim before they may take samples
[...More...]

"Prospecting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 4
The National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) is an area of land on the Alaska North Slope owned by the United States federal government and managed by the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM).[1] It lies to the west of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, which, as a U.S
[...More...]

"Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 4" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tight Oil
Tight oil
Tight oil
(also known as shale oil, shale-hosted oil or light tight oil, abbreviated LTO) is light crude oil contained in petroleum-bearing formations of low permeability, often shale or tight sandstone.[1] Economic production from tight oil formations requires the same hydraulic fracturing and often uses the same horizontal well technology used in the production of shale gas
[...More...]

"Tight Oil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Geological Survey
The United States
United States
Geological Survey (USGS, formerly simply Geological Survey) is a scientific agency of the United States
United States
government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility. The USGS is a bureau of the United States
United States
Department of the Interior; it is that department's sole scientific agency. The USGS employs approximately 8,670 people[2] and is headquartered in Reston, Virginia
[...More...]

"United States Geological Survey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cretaceous
The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
( /krɪˈteɪʃəs/, kri-TAY-shəs) is a geologic period and system that spans 79 million years from the end of the Jurassic
Jurassic
Period 145 million years ago (mya) to the beginning of the Paleogene Period 66 mya. It is the last period of the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era. The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period is usually abbreviated K, for its German translation Kreide (chalk). The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
was a period with a relatively warm climate, resulting in high eustatic sea levels that created numerous shallow inland seas. These oceans and seas were populated with now-extinct marine reptiles, ammonites and rudists, while dinosaurs continued to dominate on land. During this time, new groups of mammals and birds, as well as flowering plants, appeared
[...More...]

"Cretaceous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.