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Prudden Whitehead Monoplane
A monoplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with a single main wing plane, in contrast to a biplane or other multiplane, each of which has multiple planes. A monoplane has inherently the highest efficiency and lowest drag of any wing configuration and is the simplest to build
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Supermarine Spitfire
The Supermarine
Supermarine
Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft used by the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
and other Allied countries before, during and after World War II. Many variants of the Spitfire were built, using several wing configurations, and it was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter produced continuously throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be popular among enthusiasts; about 54 remain airworthy, and many more are static exhibits in aviation museums throughout the world. The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works, which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928
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Forward-swept Wing
A forward-swept wing is an aircraft wing configuration in which the quarter-chord line of the wing has a forward sweep. Typically, the leading edge also sweeps forward.Contents1 Characteristics1.1 Main spar location 1.2 Inward spanwise flow 1.3 Yaw instability 1.4 Aeroelasticity 1.5 Stall characteristics2 History2.1 Prewar studies 2.2 World War II and aftermath 2.3 Postwar general aviation 2.4 Return of the fast jet3 See also 4 References4.1 Inline citations 4.2 General referencesCharacteristics[edit] The forward-swept configuration has a number of characteristics which increase as the angle of sweep increases. Main spar location[edit] The rearward location of the main wing spar would lead to a more efficient interior arrangement with more usable space. Inward spanwise flow[edit]Spanwise airflow over a forward-swept wing is the reverse of flow over a conventional swept wing.Air flowing over any swept wing tends to move spanwise towards the rearmost end of the wing
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Bracing (aeronautics)
In aeronautics, bracing comprises additional structural members which stiffen the functional airframe to give it rigidity and strength under load. Bracing may be applied both internally and externally, and may take the form of strut, which act in compression or tension as the need arises, and/or wires, which act only in tension. In general, bracing allows a stronger, lighter structure than one which is unbraced, but external bracing in particular adds drag which slows down the aircraft and raises considerably more design issues than internal bracing. Another disadvantage of bracing wires is that they require routine checking and adjustment, or rigging, even when located internally. During the early years of aviation, bracing was a universal feature of all forms of aeroplane, including the monoplanes and biplanes which were then equally common
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Aspect Ratio (aeronautics)
In aeronautics, the aspect ratio of a wing is the ratio of its span to its mean chord. It is equal to the square of the wingspan divided by the wing area
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Fuselage
The fuselage (/ˈfjuːzəlɑːʒ/; from the French fuselé "spindle-shaped") is an aircraft's main body section. It holds crew, passengers, and cargo. In single-engine aircraft it will usually contain an engine, as well, although in some amphibious aircraft the single engine is mounted on a pylon attached to the fuselage, which in turn is used as a floating hull
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Curtiss P-40 Warhawk
The Curtiss P-40
P-40
Warhawk is an American single-engined, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground-attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. The P-40
P-40
design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36 Hawk which reduced development time and enabled a rapid entry into production and operational service. The Warhawk was used by most Allied powers during World War II, and remained in frontline service until the end of the war. It was the third most-produced American fighter, after the P-51 and P-47; by November 1944, when production of the P-40
P-40
ceased, 13,738 had been built,[4] all at Curtiss-Wright Corporation's main production facilities at Buffalo, New York. P-40
P-40
Warhawk was the name the United States Army Air Corps
United States Army Air Corps
and after June 1941, USAAF-adopted name for all models, making it the official name in the U.S. for all P-40s
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Dihedral (aeronautics)
Dihedral angle
Dihedral angle
is the upward angle from horizontal of the wings or tailplane of a fixed-wing aircraft. "Anhedral angle" is the name given to negative dihedral angle, that is, when there is a downward angle from horizontal of the wings or tailplane of a fixed-wing aircraft.Schematic of dihedral and anhedral angle of an aircraft wing Dihedral angle
Dihedral angle
(or anhedral angle) has a strong influence on dihedral effect, which is named after it. Dihedral effect is the amount of roll moment produced per degree (or radian) of sideslip. Dihedral effect is a critical factor in the stability of an aircraft about the roll axis (the spiral mode). It is also pertinent to the nature of an aircraft's Dutch roll
Dutch roll
oscillation and to maneuverability about the roll axis.Measuring the dihedral angleLongitudinal dihedral is a comparatively obscure term related to the pitch axis of an airplane
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Ground Effect (aerodynamics)
In fixed-wing aircraft, ground effect is the increased lift (force) and decreased aerodynamic drag that an aircraft's wings generate when they are close to a fixed surface.[1] When landing, ground effect can give the pilot the feeling that the aircraft is "floating". When taking off, ground effect may temporarily reduce the stall speed
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De Havilland Vampire
The de Havilland Vampire is a British jet fighter developed and manufactured by the de Havilland Aircraft Company. It had the distinction of being the second jet fighter, following after the Gloster Meteor, to be operated by the RAF
RAF
and the first to be powered by a single jet engine. Work on the Vampire commenced during 1941 in the midst of the Second World War; it was initially intended as an experimental aircraft, albeit one that was suitable for combat, that harnessed the groundbreaking innovation of jet propulsion. Out of the company's design studies, it was quickly decided to settle on a single-engine, twin-boom aircraft, powered by the Halford H.1 turbojet engine (later produced as the "Goblin")
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ARV Super2
The ARV Super2
ARV Super2
is a British two-seat, strut-braced, shoulder wing, tricycle landing gear light aircraft designed by Bruce Giddings.[1] Available either factory-built or as a kit, it was intended to be both a cost-effective trainer[2] and an affordable aircraft for private owners.[3] Later called the "Opus", it gained US Federal Aviation Administration Light-sport aircraft
Light-sport aircraft
approval in February 2008.[4][5] About 35[6] aircraft were produced in the 1980s before the Isle of Wight-based company went into liquidation.[7] Subsequently there have been a number of attempts to restart production, all unsuccessful, of which the most recent was by Opus Aircraft
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Center Of Gravity
In physics, the center of mass of a distribution of mass in space is the unique point where the weighted relative position of the distributed mass sums to zero, or the point where if a force is applied it moves in the direction of the force without rotating. The distribution of mass is balanced around the center of mass and the average of the weighted position coordinates of the distributed mass defines its coordinates. Calculations in mechanics are often simplified when formulated with respect to the center of mass. It is a hypothetical point where entire mass of an object may be assumed to be concentrated to visualise its motion. In other words, the center of mass is the particle equivalent of a given object for application of Newton's laws of motion. In the case of a single rigid body, the center of mass is fixed in relation to the body, and if the body has uniform density, it will be located at the centroid
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Military Aircraft
A military aircraft is any fixed-wing or rotary-wing aircraft that is operated by a legal or insurrectionary armed service of any type.[1] Military aircraft
Military aircraft
can be either combat or non-combat:Combat aircraft are designed to destroy enemy equipment using their own aircraft ordnance.[1] Combat aircraft are normally developed and procured only by military forces. Non-combat aircraft are not designed for combat as their primary function, but may carry weapons for self-defense
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Malmö MFI-9
The Malmö Flygindustri MFI-9 Junior was a light aircraft produced in Sweden
Sweden
in the 1960s. The aircraft was also produced under license as the Bölkow
Bölkow
Bo 208.Contents1 Development1.1 MiniCOINs2 Variants 3 Military operators 4 Specifications (MFI-9B) 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDevelopment[edit] The BA-7 was designed by Björn Andreasson (sv) and flown by him in prototype form on 10 October 1958. He built this first plane in his spare time while working for Convair
Convair
in the United States. It was powered by an air-cooled Continental A-75 engine giving 56 kW (75 hp) driving a two-bladed variable-pitch propeller
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Saab Safari
Saab MFI-15 Safari, also known as the Saab MFI-17 Supporter, is a propeller-powered basic trainer aircraft used by several air forces.Contents1 Development and design 2 Variants 3 Operators3.1 MFI-17 Supporter3.1.1 Former operators3.2 MFI-17 Mushshak4 Specifications (Safari) 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDevelopment and design[edit] On 11 July 1969 Saab flew the prototype (SE-301) of a two/three-seat civil/military trainer or general utility aircraft allocated the designation Saab-MFI 15. Developed at Malmö Flygindustri, it was powered by a 119 kW Avco Lycoming IO-320-B2 flat-four engine and with a conventional low-set tailplane
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Bombardier Dash 8
The Bombardier Dash 8
Bombardier Dash 8
or Q-Series, previously known as the de Havilland Canada Dash 8 or DHC-8, is a series of twin-engine, medium-range, turboprop airliners. Introduced by de Havilland Canada (DHC) in 1984, they are now produced by Bombardier Aerospace. Over 1,000 Dash 8s of all models have been built.[3] The Dash 8 was developed from the de Havilland Canada Dash 7, which featured extreme short take-off and landing (STOL) performance. With the Dash 8, DHC focused on improving cruise performance and lowering operational costs. The engine chosen was the Pratt & Whitney Canada PW100. The aircraft has been delivered in four series. The Series 100 has a maximum capacity of 39, the Series 200 has the same capacity but offers more powerful engines, the Series 300 is a stretched, 50-seat version, and the Series 400 is further stretched to 78 passengers
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