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Protagoras
Protagoras
Protagoras
(/proʊˈtæɡərəs/; Greek: Πρωταγόρας; c. 490 – c. 420 BC)[1] was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher and is numbered as one of the sophists by Plato. In his dialogue, Protagoras, Plato credits him with having invented the role of the professional sophist. He also is believed to have created a major controversy during ancient times through his statement that, "Man is the measure of all things", interpreted by Plato
Plato
to mean that there is no absolute truth, but that which individuals deem to be the truth
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Gender-neutral Language
Gender-neutral language
Gender-neutral language
or gender-inclusive language is language that avoids bias toward a particular sex or social gender
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John Daniel Wild
John Daniel Wild (April 10, 1902 – October 23, 1972) was a twentieth-century American philosopher. Wild began his philosophical career as an empiricist and realist but became an important proponent of existentialism and phenomenology in the United States.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Major works2.1 Books 2.2 Books edited3 See also 4 Notes 5 Further readingLife and career[edit] Wild was born in Chicago, Illinois. After undergraduate studies at the University of Chicago, he received his master's degree from Harvard University and completed his PhD at the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
in 1926.[2] He taught for a year at the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
and then at Harvard from 1927 until 1961 when he left to assume the chairmanship of the philosophy department at Northwestern University, a leading center for phenomenology and existentialism in the United States
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Philosopher
A philosopher is someone who practices philosophy, which involves rational inquiry into areas that are outside either theology or science.[1] The term "philosopher" comes from the Ancient Greek φιλόσοφος (philosophos) meaning "lover of wisdom". The coining of the term has been attributed to the Greek thinker Pythagoras
Pythagoras
(6th century BC).[2] In the classical sense, a philosopher was someone who lived according to a certain way of life, focusing on resolving existential questions about the human condition, and not someone who discourses upon theories or comments upon authors.[3] Typically, these particular brands of philosophy are Hellenistic ones and those who most arduously commit themselves to this lifestyle may be considered philosophers. A philosopher is one who challenges what is thought to be common sense, doesn’t know when to stop asking questions, and reexamines the old ways of thought
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Xanthi (regional Unit)
Xanthi
Xanthi
(pronounced [ˈksanθi], Greek: Περιφερειακή ενότητα Ξάνθης) is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the Region of East Macedonia and Thrace. The capital is Xanthi. Together with the regional units Rhodope and Evros, it forms the geographical region of Western Thrace.Contents1 Geography 2 Administration2.1 Prefecture3 Transport 4 Culture 5 See also 6 ReferencesGeography[edit] Xanthi
Xanthi
borders the Bulgarian provinces of Smolyan and Kardzhali to the north, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the south. The regional unit of Kavala lies to the west, Drama to the northwest and Rhodope to the east. The Rhodope Mountains
Rhodope Mountains
cover the northern part of the regional unit
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Aulus Gellius
Aulus Gellius
Aulus Gellius
(c. 125 – after 180 AD) was a Latin
Latin
author and grammarian, who was probably born and certainly brought up in Rome. He was educated in Athens, after which he returned to Rome, where he held a judicial office. He is famous for his Attic Nights, a commonplace book, or compilation of notes on grammar, philosophy, history, antiquarianism, and other subjects, preserving fragments of the works of many authors who might otherwise be unknown today.Contents1 Life 2 Writings 3 Editions 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading7.1 Translations 7.2 Studies8 External linksLife[edit] The only source for the life of Aulus Gellius
Aulus Gellius
is the details recorded in his writings.[1] He was of good family and connections, possibly of African origin,[2] but he was probably born and certainly brought up in Rome
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Porter (carrier)
A porter, also called a bearer, is a person who carries objects or cargoes for others. The range of services conducted by porters is extensive, from shuttling luggage aboard a train (a railroad porter) to bearing heavy burdens at altitude in inclement weather on multi-month mountaineering expeditions. They can carry items on their backs (backpack) or on their heads. The word porter derives from the Latin portare (to carry).[1] The use of humans to transport cargo dates to the ancient world, prior to domesticating animals and development of the wheel
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Diogenes Laërtius
Diogenes Laërtius
Diogenes Laërtius
(/daɪˈɒdʒɪniːz leɪˈɜːrʃiəs/;[1] Greek: Διογένης Λαέρτιος, Diogenēs Laertios; fl. 3rd century AD) was a biographer of the Greek philosophers. Nothing is definitively known about his life, but his surviving Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers is a principal source for the history of Greek philosophy. "Diogenes has acquired an importance out of all proportion to his merits because the loss of many primary sources and of the earlier secondary compilations has accidentally left him the chief continuous source for the history of Greek philosophy."[2]Contents1 Life 2 Writings 3 Editions and translations 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksLife[edit] Although not definitive, Laërtius must have lived after Sextus Empiricus (c. 200), whom he mentions, and before Stephanus of Byzantium and Sopater of Apamea (c. 500), who quote him
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Olympic Games
The modern Olympic Games
Olympic Games
or Olympics (French: Jeux olympiques[1][2]) are leading international sporting events featuring summer and winter sports competitions in which thousands of athletes from around the world participate in a variety of competitions. The Olympic Games
Olympic Games
are considered the world's foremost sports competition with more than 200 nations participating.[3] The Olympic Games
Olympic Games
are held every four years, with the Summer and Winter Games alternating by occurring every four years but two years apart. Their creation was inspired by the ancient Olympic Games, which were held in Olympia, Greece, from the 8th century BC to the 4th century AD. Baron Pierre de Coubertin
Pierre de Coubertin
founded the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1894, leading to the first modern Games in Athens in 1896
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Phenomenalism
Phenomenalism is the view that physical objects cannot justifiably be said to exist in themselves, but only as perceptual phenomena or sensory stimuli (e.g. redness, hardness, softness, sweetness, etc.) situated in time and in space. In particular, some forms of phenomenalism reduce talk about physical objects in the external world to talk about bundles of sense-data.Contents1 History 2 Criticisms 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksHistory[edit] Phenomenalism is a radical form of empiricism. Its roots as an ontological view of the nature of existence can be traced back to George Berkeley
George Berkeley
and his subjective idealism, upon which David Hume further elaborated.[1] John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill
had a theory of perception which is commonly referred to as classical phenomenalism
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Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Nietzsche
(/ˈniːtʃə/[6] or /ˈniːtʃi/;[7] German: [ˈfʁiːdʁɪç ˈvɪlhɛlm ˈniːtʃə] ( listen); 15 October 1844 – 25 August 1900) was a German philosopher, cultural critic, composer, poet, philologist, and Latin
Latin
and Greek scholar whose work has exerted a profound influence on Western philosophy and modern intellectual history.[8][9][10][11] He began his career as a classical philologist before turning to philosophy
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Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero[n 1] (/ˈsɪsəroʊ/; Classical Latin: [ˈmaːr.kʊs ˈtʊl.lɪ.ʊs ˈkɪ.kɛ.roː]; 3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman politician and lawyer, who served as consul in the year 63 BC. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists.[2][3] His influence on the Latin
Latin
language was so immense that the subsequent history of prose, not only in
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John Burnet (classicist)
John Burnet, FBA (/bərˈnɛt, ˈbɜːrnɪt/; 9 December 1863 – 26 May 1928) was a Scottish classicist. He was born in Edinburgh
Edinburgh
and died in St Andrews.[1]Contents1 Life and work1.1 Early Greek Philosophy2 Legacy 3 Bibliography3.1 Major works 3.2 Editions edited and annotated by Burnet4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife and work[edit] Burnet was educated at the Royal High School, Edinburgh, the University of Edinburgh, and Balliol College, Oxford, receiving his M.A. degree in 1887. In 1887 Burnet became an assistant to Lewis Campbell at the University of St. Andrews. From 1890 to 1915, he was a Fellow at Merton College, Oxford; he was a professor of Latin at Edinburgh; from 1892 to 1926, he was Professor of Greek at the University of St. Andrews. He became a Fellow of the British Academy in 1916
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Anthropocentrism
Anthropocentrism is (/ˌænθroʊpoʊˈsɛntrɪzəm/;[1] from Greek Ancient Greek: ἄνθρωπος, ánthrōpos, "human being"; and Ancient Greek: κέντρον, kéntron, "center") is the belief that human beings are the most significant entity of the universe. Anthropocentrism interprets or regards the world in terms of human values and experiences.[2] The term can be used interchangeably with humanocentrism, and some refer to the concept as human supremacy or human exceptionalism. Anthropocentrism is considered to be profoundly embedded in many modern human cultures and conscious acts
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Noctes Atticae
Aulus Gellius (c. 125 – after 180 AD) was a Latin author and grammarian, who was probably born and certainly brought up in Rome. He was educated in Athens, after which he returned to Rome, where he held a judicial office. He is famous for his Attic Nights, a commonplace book, or compilation of notes on grammar, philosophy, history, antiquarianism, and other subjects, preserving fragments of the works of many authors who might otherwise be unknown today.Contents1 Life 2 Writings 3 Editions 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading7.1 Translations 7.2 Studies8 External linksLife[edit] The only source for the life of Aulus Gellius is the details recorded in his writings.[1] He was of good family and connections, possibly of African origin,[2] but he was probably born and certainly brought up in Rome
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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