HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by Michael S. Hart
Michael S. Hart
and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 March 2018[update], Project Gutenberg reached 56,750 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content, including regional and language-specific works
[...More...]

"Project Gutenberg" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

ISO/IEC 8859-1
ISO/IEC 8859-1:1998, Information technology — 8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets — Part 1: Latin alphabet No. 1, is part of the ISO/IEC 8859 series of ASCII-based standard character encodings, first edition published in 1987. ISO 8859-1 encodes what it refers to as "Latin alphabet no. 1," consisting of 191 characters from the Latin script. This character-encoding scheme is used throughout the Americas, Western Europe, Oceania, and much of Africa. It is also commonly used in most standard romanizations of East-Asian languages. It is the basis for most popular 8-bit character sets, including Windows-1252
Windows-1252
and the first block of characters in Unicode. It is very common (on the Internet) to mislabel Windows-1252
Windows-1252
text with the charset label ISO-8859-1
[...More...]

"ISO/IEC 8859-1" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Benedictine University
Benedictine University
University
is a private Roman Catholic university located in Lisle, a suburb of Chicago, Illinois. The school was founded in 1887 as St. Procopius College
College
by the Benedictine monks of St. Procopius Abbey in the Pilsen community on the West Side of Chicago. The institution has retained a close relationship with the Benedictine Order, which bears the name of St. Benedict (480–543 A.D.), the acknowledged father of western monasticism. The university resides within the Chicago
Chicago
metropolitan area, and is located nearby two national research facilities—Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The university's location in the East-West Tollway corridor provides various internship and employment opportunities for students
[...More...]

"Benedictine University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Node (networking)
In telecommunications networks, a node ( Latin
Latin
nodus, ‘knot’) is either a redistribution point or a communication endpoint. The definition of a node depends on the network and protocol layer referred to
[...More...]

"Node (networking)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

ARPANET
The Advanced Research Projects Agency
Advanced Research Projects Agency
Network (ARPANET) was an early packet switching network and the first network to implement the protocol suite TCP/IP. Both technologies became the technical foundation of the Internet
[...More...]

"ARPANET" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Internet
The Internet
Internet
is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite
Internet protocol suite
(TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies
[...More...]

"Internet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

DVD
DVD
DVD
(an abbreviation of "digital video disc"[5] or "digital versatile disc"[6][7]) is a digital optical disc storage format invented and developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
in 1995. The medium can store any kind of digital data and is widely used for software and other computer files as well as video programs watched using DVD
DVD
players. DVDs offer higher storage capacity than compact discs while having the same dimensions. Prerecorded DVDs are mass-produced using molding machines that physically stamp data onto the DVD. Such discs are a form of DVD-ROM because data can only be read and not written or erased. Blank recordable DVD
DVD
discs ( DVD-R
DVD-R
and DVD+R) can be recorded once using a DVD recorder and then function as a DVD-ROM
[...More...]

"DVD" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Movable Type
Movable type
Movable type
(US English; moveable type in British English) is the system and technology of printing and typography that uses movable components to reproduce the elements of a document (usually individual letters or punctuation) usually on the medium of paper. The world's first movable type printing press technology for printing paper books was made of porcelain materials and was invented around AD 1040 in China during the Northern Song Dynasty
Northern Song Dynasty
by the inventor Bi Sheng (990–1051).[1] Subsequently in 1377, the world's oldest extant movable metal print book, Jikji, was printed in Korea
Korea
during the Goryeo
Goryeo
dynasty
[...More...]

"Movable Type" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Printing Press
A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink. It marked a dramatic improvement on earlier printing methods in which the cloth, paper or other medium was brushed or rubbed repeatedly to achieve the transfer of ink, and accelerated the process. Typically used for texts, the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium.[1][2] Johannes Gutenberg, a goldsmith by profession, developed, circa 1439, a printing system by adapting existing technologies to printing purposes, as well as making inventions of his own. Printing
Printing
in East Asia had been prevalent since the Tang dynasty,[3][4] and in Europe, woodblock printing based on existing screw presses was common by the 14th century
[...More...]

"Printing Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Image Scanner
An image scanner—often abbreviated to just scanner, although the term is ambiguous out of context (barcode scanner, CT scanner etc.)—is a device that optically scans images, printed text, handwriting or an object and converts it to a digital image. Commonly used in offices are variations of the desktop flatbed scanner where the document is placed on a glass window for scanning. Hand-held scanners, where the device is moved by hand, have evolved from text scanning "wands" to 3D scanners used for industrial design, reverse engineering, test and measurement, orthotics, gaming and other applications
[...More...]

"Image Scanner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

SDS Sigma Series
The SDS Sigma series
SDS Sigma series
is a series of computers that were introduced by Scientific Data Systems
Scientific Data Systems
in 1966.[1] The first machines in the series are the 16-bit Sigma 2 and the 32-bit
32-bit
Sigma 7; the Sigma 7 was the first 32-bit
32-bit
computer released by SDS. At the time the only competition for the Sigma 7 was the IBM 360. Memory size increments for all SDS/XDS/Xerox computers are stated in kWords, not kBytes. For example, the Sigma 5 base memory is 16K 32-Bit words (64K Bytes)
[...More...]

"SDS Sigma Series" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carnegie Mellon University
Coordinates: 40°26′36″N 79°56′37″W / 40.443322°N 79.943583°W / 40.443322; -79.943583 Carnegie Mellon University
Carnegie Mellon University
(Carnegie Mellon or CMU /ˈkɑːrnɪɡi ˈmɛlən/ or /kɑːrˈneɪɡi ˈmɛlən/) is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1900 by Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
as the Carnegie Technical Schools, the university became the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1912 and began granting four-year degrees. In 1967, the Carnegie Institute of Technology merged with the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research
Mellon Institute of Industrial Research
to form Carnegie Mellon University. The university's 140-acre (57 ha) main campus is 3 miles (5 km) from Downtown Pittsburgh
[...More...]

"Carnegie Mellon University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hyperlink
In computing, a hyperlink, or simply a link, is a reference to data that the reader can directly follow either by clicking, tapping, or hovering.[1] A hyperlink points to a whole document or to a specific element within a document. Hypertext
Hypertext
is text with hyperlinks. The text that is linked from is called anchor text. A software system that is used for viewing and creating hypertext is a hypertext system, and to create a hyperlink is to hyperlink (or simply to link)
[...More...]

"Hyperlink" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill
Coordinates: 35°54′30″N 79°3′0″W / 35.90833°N 79.05000°W / 35.90833; -79.05000University of North CarolinaFormer names North Carolina
North Carolina
University (1789–1963)Motto Lux libertas[1] (Latin)Motto in EnglishLight and liberty[1]Type Public FlagshipEstablished December 11, 1789[2]Parent institutionUNC SystemAcademic affiliationsURA AAU SURA APLUEndowment $3.9 billion (2016)[3]Chancellor Carol Folt[4]Academic staff3,696 (Fall 2015)[5]Administrative staff8,287 (F
[...More...]

"University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Non-profit Organization
A non-profit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity[1] or non-profit institution,[2] is dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a shared point of view. In economic terms, it is an organization that uses its surplus of the revenues to further achieve its ultimate objective, rather than distributing its income to the organization's shareholders, leaders, or members. Non-profits are tax exempt or charitable, meaning they do not pay income tax on the money that they receive for their organization. They can operate in religious, scientific, research, or educational settings. The key aspects of nonprofits is accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into the organization. Nonprofit organizations are accountable to the donors, funders, volunteers, program recipients, and the public community
[...More...]

"Non-profit Organization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mississippi
Mississippi
Mississippi
(/ˌmɪsɪˈsɪpi/ ( listen)) is a state in the Southern United States, with part of its southern border formed by the Gulf of Mexico. Its western border is formed by the Mississippi
Mississippi
River. The state has a population of approximately 3 million. It is the 32nd most extensive and the 32nd most populous of the 50 United States. Located in the center of the state, Jackson is the state capital and largest city, with a population of approximately 175,000 people. The state is heavily forested outside of the Mississippi Delta
Mississippi Delta
area, between the Mississippi
Mississippi
and Yazoo rivers. Before the American Civil War, most development in the state was along riverfronts, where slaves worked on cotton plantations. After the war, the bottomlands to the interior were cleared, mostly by freedmen
[...More...]

"Mississippi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.