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Pro-Growth Budgeting Act Of 2013
The Pro-Growth Budgeting Act of 2013
Pro-Growth Budgeting Act of 2013
(H.R. 1874) is a bill that would require the Congressional Budget Office
Congressional Budget Office
to provide a macroeconomic impact analysis for bills that are estimated to have a large budgetary effect.[1] The bill was introduced into the United States House of Representatives during the 113th United States Congress. The Pro-Growth Budgeting Act of 2013
Pro-Growth Budgeting Act of 2013
was introduced at the same time as the Baseline Reform Act of 2013 (H.R. 1871; 113th Congress) and the Budget and Accounting Transparency Act of 2014 (H.R
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113th United States Congress
The One Hundred Thirteenth United States
United States
Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States
United States
federal government, from January 3, 2013, to January 3, 2015, during the fifth and sixth years of Barack Obama's presidency. It was composed of the United States Senate and the United States
United States
House of Representatives based on the results of the 2012 Senate elections and the 2012 House elections. The seats in the House were apportioned based on the 2010 United States Census. It first met in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
on January 3, 2013, and it ended on January 3, 2015. Senators elected to regular terms in 2008 were in the last two years of those terms during this Congress. The Senate had a Democratic majority, while the House had a Republican majority
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Fiscal Year
A fiscal year (or financial year, or sometimes budget year) is the period used by governments for accounting and budget purposes, which vary between countries. It is also used for financial reporting by business and other organizations. Laws in many jurisdictions require company financial reports to be prepared and published on an annual basis, but generally do not require the reporting period to align with the calendar year (1 January to 31 December). Taxation laws generally require accounting records to be maintained and taxes calculated on an annual basis, which usually corresponds to the fiscal year used for government purposes. The calculation of tax on an annual basis is especially relevant for direct taxaction, such as income tax. Many annual government fees—such as Council rates, licence fees, etc.—are also levied on a fiscal year basis, while others are charged on an anniversary basis. The "fiscal year end" (FYE) is the date that marks the end of the fiscal year
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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United States Government
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Copyright Status Of Work By The U.S. Government
A work of the United States
United States
government, as defined by the United States copyright law, is "a work prepared by an officer or employee" of the federal government "as part of that person's official duties."[1] In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act,[2] such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This act only applies to U.S. domestic copyright as that is the extent of U.S. federal law. The U.S. government asserts that it can still hold the copyright to those works in other countries.[3][4] Publication of an otherwise protected work by the U.S. government does not put that work in the public domain. For example, government publications may include works copyrighted by a contractor or grantee; copyrighted material assigned to the U.S
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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Trickle-down Economics
Trickle-down economics, also referred to as trickle-down theory, is an economic theory that advocates reducing taxes on businesses and the wealthy in society as a means to stimulate business investment in the short term and benefit society at large in the long term. It is a form of laissez-faire capitalism in general and more specifically supply-side economics. Whereas general supply-side theory favors lowering taxes overall, trickle-down theory more specifically targets taxes on the upper end of the economic spectrum.[1][2] The term "trickle-down" originated as a joke by humorist Will Rogers and today is often used to criticize economic policies which favor the wealthy or privileged, while being framed as good for the average citizen. In recent history, it has been used by critics of supply-side economic policies, such as "Reaganomics"
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Americans For Prosperity
Americans for Prosperity
Americans for Prosperity
(AFP), founded in 2004, is a libertarian/conservative political advocacy group in the United States funded by David H. Koch
David H. Koch
and Charles Koch. As the Koch brothers' primary political advocacy group, it is one of the most influential American conservative organizations.[5][6][7] After the 2009 inauguration of President Barack Obama, AFP helped transform the Tea Party movement
Tea Party movement
into a political force. It organized significant opposition to Obama administration initiatives such as global warming regulation, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the expansion of Medicaid
Medicaid
and economic stimulus. It helped turn back cap and trade, the major environmental proposal of Obama's first term
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Paul Ryan
v t ePaul Davis Ryan Jr. (born January 29, 1970) is an American politician serving as the 54th Speaker of the United States House of Representatives since 2015. He was the Republican Party nominee for Vice President of the United States, running alongside former Massachusetts
Massachusetts
governor Mitt Romney
Mitt Romney
in the 2012 U.S. presidential election.[1][2] Ryan also has been the U.S. Representative for Wisconsin's 1st congressional district since 1999. He was previously chair of the House Ways and Means Committee from January 3 to October 29, 2015, and, before that, chair of the House Budget Committee
House Budget Committee
from 2011 to 2015. Ryan, together with Democratic Party U.S. Senator Patty Murray, negotiated the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013.[3][4][5] On October 29, 2015, Ryan was elected to replace John Boehner
John Boehner
as Speaker of the U.S
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Unfunded Mandates Reform Act
The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA) (Pub.L. 104–4) restricts the federal imposition of unfunded mandates on state, local and tribal governments. History[edit] UMRA was introduced on January 4, 1995, in the Senate by Dirk Kempthorne of Idaho as S. 1 to the Committees on the Budget and Governmental Affairs. It passed the full Senate on the 27th by a vote of 86 to 10; an identical version passed the House on February 1st. It was signed into law by president Bill Clinton on March 22nd. Provisions[edit] The four titles of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act are: Title I: Legislative Accountability and Reform. Any bill passed by committee must be submitted to the director of the Congressional Budget Office so that any federal mandates may be identified
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PAYGO
PAYGO (Pay As You GO) is the practice in the United States of financing expenditures with funds that are currently available rather than borrowed.Contents1 Budgeting1.1 History1.1.1 Statutory PAYGO (1990–2002) 1.1.2 PAYGO not in effect (2003–2006) 1.1.3 PAYGO as House rule (2007–2010) 1.1.4 Return of statutory PAYGO (2010–present)2 Social insurance2.1 U.S. Social Security3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBudgeting[edit] The PAYGO compels new spending or tax changes not to add to the federal debt. Not to be confused with pay-as-you-go financing, which is when a government saves up money to fund a specific project
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Appropriations Bill (United States)
An appropriations bill is a bill that appropriates (gives to, sets aside for) money to specific federal government departments, agencies, and programs. The money provides funding for operations, personnel, equipment, and activities.[1] Regular appropriations bills are passed annually, with the funding they provide covering one fiscal year
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Gross Domestic Product
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product
(GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly) of time. Nominal GDP estimates are commonly used to determine the economic performance of a whole country or region, and to make international comparisons
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software creat
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Congressional Research Service
The Congressional Research Service
Congressional Research Service
(CRS), known as Congress's think tank,[3] is a public policy research arm of the United States Congress. As a legislative branch agency within the Library of Congress, CRS works primarily and directly for Members of Congress, their Committees and staff on a confidential, nonpartisan basis. Its staff of approximately 600 employees includes lawyers, economists, reference librarians, and social, natural, and physical scientists.[4] In fiscal year 2016, CRS was appropriated a budget of roughly $106.9 million by Congress.[1] CRS is joined by two major congressional support agencies. The Congressional Budget Office
Congressional Budget Office
provides Congress with budget-related information, reports on fiscal, budgetary, and programmatic issues, and analyses of budget policy options, costs, and effects
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