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Principality Of Turov
The Principality of Turov, also called Duchy of Turov and Pinsk (Belarusian: Турава-Пінскае княства, Ukrainian: Турово-Пінське князівство) by East Slavic scholars, was a medieval principality and important subdivision of Kievan Rus
Kievan Rus
since the 10th century on the territory of modern southern Belarus
Belarus
and northern Ukraine. Princes of Turov often served as the Grand Princes of Rus early in 10th-11th centuries. The principality's capital was Turov (now called Turaŭ) and other important cities were Pinsk, Mazyr, Slutsk, Lutsk, Berestia, and Volodymyr. Until the 12th century the principality was very closely associated with the principalities of Kiev and Volhynia. Later for a short period time until the Mongol invasion it enjoyed a wide degree of autonomy when it was annexed to the Kingdom of Rus
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Gediminas
Gediminas
Gediminas
(c. 1275 – December 1341) was Grand Duke
Grand Duke
of Lithuania from 1315 or 1316[1][2] until his death
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Rostislav Vsevolodovich
Rostislav Vsevolodovich (Russian: Ростислав Всеволодович) (1070–1093) was the Prince of Pereyaslavl (1078–1093), son of Vsevolod I of Kiev, and half brother of Vladimir Monomakh. He fought at Stugna river against the Cumans
Cumans
and drowned while fleeing the battle.[1] Notes[edit]^ Basil Dmytryshyn, Medieval Russia: A sourcebook 850-1700, (Academic International Press, 2000), 60.   This Russian history-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t e   This Ukrainian history-related article is a stub
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Rogvolod
Rogvolod
Rogvolod
(Russian: Рогволод, Rogvolod; Belarusian: Рагвалод, Rahvałod) (c. 920 – 978) was first chronicled prince of Polatsk
Polatsk
(945–978). In the Russian Primary Chronicle, he is known as Рогъволодъ, probably a slavicized version of the Old Norse
Old Norse
name Ragnvald. He came from overseas (i.e., from Scandinavia or Southern Baltic) and established himself at Polatsk
Polatsk
in the mid-10th century
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Vladimir The Great
Vladimir the Great
Vladimir the Great
(also (Saint) Vladimir of Kiev; Old East Slavic: Володимѣръ Свѧтославичь, Volodiměrъ Svętoslavičь,[3] Old Norse Valdamarr gamli;[4] c. 958 – 15 July 1015, Berestove) was a prince of Novgorod, grand prince of Kiev, and ruler of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
from 980 to 1015.[5][6] Vladimir's father was prince Sviatoslav of the Rurik dynasty.[7] After the death of his father in 972, Vladimir, who was then prince of Novgorod, was forced to flee to Scandinavia
Scandinavia
in 976 after his brother Yaropolk had murdered his other brother Oleg and conquered Rus'
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Yaroslav The Wise
Yaroslav I, Grand Prince of Rus', known as Yaroslav the Wise
Yaroslav the Wise
or Iaroslav the Wise (Old East Slavic: Ꙗрославъ Володимѣровичъ Мѫдрꙑи; Russian: Яросла́в Му́дрый, translit. Jaroslav Mudryj [jɪrɐˈslaf ˈmudrɨj]; Ukrainian: Яросла́в Му́дрий, translit. Jaroslav Mudryj [jɐroˈslɑu̯ ˈmudrɪj]; Old Norse: Jarizleifr Valdamarsson;[1]; Latin: Iaroslaus Sapiens; c. 978 – 20 February 1054) was thrice grand prince of Veliky Novgorod
Veliky Novgorod
and Kiev, uniting the two principalities for a time under his rule. Yaroslav's Christian name was George (Yuri) after Saint George
Saint George
(Old East Slavic: Гюрьгi, Gjurĭgì). A son of Vladimir the Great, the first Christian Prince of Novgorod, Yaroslav acted as vice-regent of Novgorod
Novgorod
at the time of his father's death in 1015
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Izyaslav I Of Kiev
Iziaslav Yaroslavich (1024 – 3 October 1078, baptized as Demetrius) Kniaz'
Kniaz'
(Prince) of Turov, Veliki Kniaz
Veliki Kniaz
(Grand Prince) of Kiev
Kiev
(from 1054). Iziaslav's children Yaropolk and Sviatopolk would rule the Turov Principality. Their authority was mainly challenged by the Rostilavichi of Rostislav Vsevolodovich.Contents1 Biography 2 Children 3 Ancestry 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksBiography[edit] Iziaslav was the oldest son of Yaroslav I the Wise
Yaroslav I the Wise
by his second wife Ingigerd Olafsdottir. Iziaslav succeeded his father, after Yaroslav's oldest child, Vladimir (the only child by Yaroslav's first wife), had predeceased his father
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Casimir I Of Poland
Casimir I the Restorer
Casimir I the Restorer
(Polish: Kazimierz I Odnowiciel; b. Kraków, 25 July 1016 – d. Poznań, 28 November 1058), was Duke
Duke
of Poland
Poland
of the Piast dynasty
Piast dynasty
and the de jure monarch of the entire country from 1034 until his death. He was the only son of Mieszko II Lambert
Mieszko II Lambert
by his wife Richeza, daughter of Count Palatine Ezzo of Lotharingia
Lotharingia
(of the Ezzonids) and granddaughter of Emperor Otto II. Casimir is known as the Restorer because he managed to reunite all parts of the Polish Kingdom after a period of turmoil. He reinstated Masovia, Silesia
Silesia
and Pomerania
Pomerania
into his realm
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Knyaz
Knyaz
Knyaz
or knez is a historical Slavic title, used both as a royal and noble title in different times of history and different ancient Slavic lands. It is usually translated into English as prince, duke or count, depending on specific historical context and the potentially known Latin
Latin
equivalents of the title for each bearer of the name. In Latin, sources the title is usually translated as comes or princeps, but the word was originally derived from the Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
kuningaz (king).[1] The female form transliterated from Bulgarian and Russian is knyaginya (княгиня), kniahynia (княгиня) in Ukrainian, kneginja in Slovene, Croatian and Serbian (Serbian Cyrillic: кнегиња). In Russian, the daughter of a knyaz is knyazhna (княжна), in Ukrainian is kniazivna (князівна)
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Vsevolod I Of Kiev
Vsevolod I
Vsevolod I
Yaroslavich (Russian: Всеволод I Ярославович, Ukrainian: Всеволод I Ярославич, Old Norse: Vissivald), (1030 – 13 April 1093) ruled as Grand Prince of Kiev
Kiev
from 1078 until his death.Contents1 Early life 2 Reign 3 Children 4 Ancestry 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksEarly life[edit] He was the fifth[1] and favourite son of Yaroslav I the Wise
Yaroslav I the Wise
by Ingigerd Olafsdottir
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Yaropolk Izyaslavich
Yaropolk Izyaslavich[2] (died 1087) was a Knyaz
Knyaz
(prince) during the eleventh-century in the Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
kingdom and was the King of Rus (1076–1078). The son of Grand Prince Izyaslav Yaroslavich by a Polish princess named Gertruda, he is visible in papal sources by the early 1070s but largely absent in contemporary Rus sources until his father's death in 1078. During his father's exile in the 1070s, Yaropolk can be found acting on his father's behalf in an attempt to gain the favor of the German emperors and the papal court of Pope Gregory VII
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Galicia (Eastern Europe)
Galicia (Ukrainian and Rusyn: Галичина, Halyčyna; Polish: Galicja; Czech and Slovak: Halič; German: Galizien; Hungarian: Galícia/Kaliz/Gácsország/Halics; Romanian: Galiția/Halici; Russian: Галиция, Galicija; Yiddish: גאַליציע‎ Galitsiye) is a historical and geographic region in Central Europe[1][2][3] once a small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia
and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, that straddled the modern-day border between Poland
Poland
and Ukraine
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Drevlyans
The Drevlians
Drevlians
(Ukrainian: Древляни, translit. Drevliany) were a tribe of Early East Slavs
Early East Slavs
between the 6th and the 10th century, which inhabited the territories of Polesia
Polesia
and Right-bank Ukraine, west of the eastern Polans and along the lower reaches of the rivers Teteriv, Uzh, Ubort, and Stviga. To the west, the Drevlians' territories reached the Sluch River, where the Volynians
Volynians
(related to the territory of Volynia) and Buzhans (related to the name of Southern Bug river) lived
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Vladimir II Monomakh
Vladimir II Monomakh
Vladimir II Monomakh
(Old East Slavic: Володимѣръ Мономахъ, Volodimer Monomakh; Christian name: Vasiliy, or Basileios) (1053 – 19 May 1125) reigned as Grand Prince
Grand Prince
of Kievan Rus' from 1113 to 1125.Contents1 Family 2 Reign 3 Marriages and children 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 Further reading 8 External linksFamily[edit] He was the son of Vsevolod I (married in 1046) by a relative of Byzantine emperor Constantine IX Monomachos, from whom Vladimir obtained his surname.[1] Contemporary Byzantine naming practice allowed the adoption of a maternal surname if the mother's family was perceived to be of a more exalted origin than that of the father.[2] Reign[edit]The Testament of Vladimir Monomakh to Children, 1125
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Sviatopolk II Of Kiev
Out of wedlock: Mstislav With the first: Iaroslav Zbyslava Predslava With the second: Anna Maria Bryachislav IzyaslavFull nameSviatopolk Iziaslavovich (Mikhail)Dynasty RurikidFather Iziaslav ISviatopolk II Iziaslavich (1050 – April 16, 1113) was supreme ruler of the Kievan Rus
Kievan Rus
for 20 years, from 1093 to 1113. He was not a popular prince, and his reign was marked by incessant rivalry with his cousin Vladimir Monomakh. Upon his death the Kievan citizens raised a rebellion against the Jewish merchants and Varangian
Varangian
officials who speculated in grain and salt.Contents1 Early life 2 Reign 3 Marriage and children 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Sviatopolk was the son of Iziaslav Iaroslavich by his concubine. Sviatopolk's Christian
Christian
name was Michael
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Vladimir Monomakh
Vladimir
Vladimir
may refer to:Contents1 Names 2 Places 3 Religious leaders 4 Musicians 5 Nobles 6 Political and military leaders 7 Sports people 8 Fictional characters 9 Actors, writers, poets 10 Artists 11 Ships 12 See alsoNames[edit] Vladimir
Vladimir
(name), Bulgaria
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