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Principality Of Polotsk
The Principality
Principality
of Polotsk, also known as the Kingdom of Polotsk
Polotsk
or the Duchy of Polotsk
Polotsk
(Belarusian: По́лацкае кня́ства; Russian: По́лоцкое кня́жество), was a medieval principality of the Early East Slavs. The origin and date of state establishment is uncertain. The Russian chronicles mention Polotsk being conquered by Vladimir the Great,[1] and thereafter it became associated with the Rurik dynasty
Rurik dynasty
and Kievan Rus'. The Principality
Principality
was supposedly established around the ancient town of Polotsk
Polotsk
(modern Polatsk, Belarus) by the tribal union of Krivichs
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Partitions Of Poland
The Partitions of Poland[nb 1] were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
that took place towards the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland
Poland
and Lithuania
Lithuania
for 123 years. The partitions were conducted by Habsburg Austria, the Kingdom of Prussia, and the Russian Empire, which divided up the Commonwealth lands among themselves progressively in the process of territorial seizures and annexations.[1][2][3][4] The First Partition of Poland
Poland
was decided on August 5, 1772. Two decades later, Russian and Prussian troops entered the Commonwealth again and the Second Partition was signed on January 23, 1793. Austria did not participate in the Second Partition
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Vladimir I Of Kiev
Vladimir the Great
Vladimir the Great
(also (Saint) Vladimir of Kiev; Old East Slavic: Володимѣръ Свѧтославичь, Volodiměrъ Svętoslavičь,[3] Old Norse Valdamarr gamli;[4] c. 958 – 15 July 1015, Berestove) was a prince of Novgorod, grand prince of Kiev, and ruler of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
from 980 to 1015.[5][6] Vladimir's father was prince Sviatoslav of the Rurik dynasty.[7] After the death of his father in 972, Vladimir, who was then prince of Novgorod, was forced to flee to Scandinavia
Scandinavia
in 976 after his brother Yaropolk had murdered his other brother Oleg and conquered Rus'
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Rurik
Rurik
Rurik
(also Riurik; Old Church Slavonic
Old Church Slavonic
Рюрикъ Rjurikŭ, from Old Norse
Old Norse
Hrøríkʀ; c. 830 – 879), according to the 12th-century Primary Chronicle, was a Varangian
Varangian
chieftain of the Rus' who in the year 862 gained control of Ladoga, and built the Holmgard
Holmgard
settlement near Novgorod
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Murom
Murom
Murom
(Russian: Муром, IPA: [ˈmurəm]; Old Norse: Moramar) is a historical city in Vladimir Oblast, Russia, which sprawls along the left bank of the Oka River. Population: 116,075 (2010 Census);[7] 126,901 (2002 Census);[10] 124,229 (1989 Census).[11]Contents1 History 2 Administrative and municipal status 3 Sights 4 International relations4.1 Twin towns — Sister cities5 Notable people 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 SourcesHistory[edit] In the 9th century CE, the city marked the easternmost settlement of the East Slavs
East Slavs
in the land of the Finno-Ugric people called Muromians. The Primary Chronicle
Primary Chronicle
mentions it as early as 862.[12] It is thus one of the oldest cities in Russia
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Beloozero
Belozersk
Belozersk
(Russian: Белозе́рск) is a town and the administrative center of Belozersky District in Vologda
Vologda
Oblast, Russia, located on the southern bank of Lake Beloye, from which it takes the name, 214 kilometers (133 mi) northwest of Vologda, the administrative center of the oblast
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Early East Slavs
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
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Krivichs
The Krivichi (Belarusian: Крывічы, Kryvičý, IPA: [kɾɨviˈt͡ʃɨ:]; Russian: Кривичи́, IPA: [krʲɪvʲɪˈtɕi]) was one of the tribal unions of Early East Slavs between the 6th and the 12th centuries.[1] They migrated to the mostly Finnic areas in the upper reaches of the Volga, Dnieper, Western Dvina, areas south of the lower reaches of river Velikaya and parts of the Neman basin.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Modern uses of the name 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Many historians suggest that the name of the tribe probably stems from that of their legendary forefather Kriv, possibly a kniaz or a voivode. According to Max Vasmer, this sobriquet was derived from the Slavic adjective krivoy ("crooked/twisted") due to some possible birth defect
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Varangian
The Varangians
Varangians
(/vəˈrændʒiənz/; Old Norse: Væringjar; Greek: Βάραγγοι, Várangoi, Βαριάγοι, Variágoi) was the name given by Greeks, Rus' people
Rus' people
and Ruthenians to Vikings,[1][2][3][4] who between the 9th and 11th centuries, ruled the medieval state of Kievan Rus', settled among many territories of modern Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, and formed the Byzantine
Byzantine
Varangian Guard.[5][6] According to the 12th century Kievan Primary Chronicle, a group of Varangians known as the Rus'[7] settled in Novgorod
Novgorod
in 862 under the leadership of Rurik. Before Rurik, the Rus' might have ruled an earlier hypothetical polity
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Kiev
Kiev
Kiev
(/ˈkiːɛf, -ɛv/ KEE-ef, -ev)[10] or Kyiv (Ukrainian: Київ, translit. Kyiv [ˈkɪjiu̯] ( listen); Old East Slavic: Кыѥвъ, translit. Kyjev; Polish: Kijów Polish pronunciation: [ˈkʲijuf]; Russian: Киев, translit. Kiyev [ˈkʲiɪf]) is the capital and largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper. The population in July 2015 was 2,887,974[2] (though higher estimated numbers have been cited in the press),[11] making Kiev
Kiev
the 7th most populous city in Europe.[12] Kiev
Kiev
is an important industrial, scientific, educational, and cultural centre of Eastern Europe
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Sviatoslav I Of Kiev
Sviatoslav I Igorevich (Old East Slavic: С~тославъ / Свѧтославъ[1] Игорєвичь, Sventoslavŭ / Svantoslavŭ Igorevičǐ; Old Norse: Sveinald Ingvarsson) (c. 942 – 26 March 972), also spelled Svyatoslav was a Grand prince of Kiev[2][3] famous for his persistent campaigns in the east and south, which precipitated the collapse of two great powers of Eastern Europe, Khazaria and the First Bulgarian Empire. He also conquered numerous East Slavic tribes, defeated the Alans
Alans
and attacked the Volga Bulgars,[4][5] and at times was allied with the Pechenegs
Pechenegs
and Magyars. His decade-long reign over the Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
was marked by rapid expansion into the Volga River
Volga River
valley, the Pontic steppe, and the Balkans
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Yaropolk I Of Kiev
Yaropolk I Sviatoslavich (c. 958–960 – 11 June? 980) (East Slavic: Ярополк I Святославич, sometimes transliterated as Iaropolk) was a young and rather enigmatic ruler of Kiev
Kiev
between 972 and 980. He was the oldest son of Svyatoslav. His royal title is traditionally translated as "Prince".Contents1 Life 2 Purported baptism 3 Marriage and issues 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Yaropolk was given Kiev
Kiev
by his father Sviatoslav I, who left on a military campaign against the Danube
Danube
Bulgars. Soon after Svyatoslav's death, however, civil war began between Yaropolk and his brothers. According to one chronicle, Yaropolk's brother Oleg killed Lyut, the son of Yaropolk's chief adviser and military commander Sveneld. In an act of revenge and at the insistence of Sveneld, Yaropolk went to war against his brother and killed him
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Zaslawye
Zaslawye
Zaslawye
or Zaslaŭje (Belarusian: Засла́ўе, [zaˈsɫau̯je]; Russian: Заславль; Polish: Zasław; Lithuanian: Zaslavlis) is a historic city in Minsk
Minsk
Province of Belarus, 20 kilometres northwest of Minsk. In 2009 its population was 14,400.[1]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Sites 4 Notable residents 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] According to chronicles, Zaslawye
Zaslawye
was founded in 985 by Vladimir the Great who sent his wife Rogneda
Rogneda
to live here with their son Izyaslav of Polotsk, the founder of the princely house of Polatsk. It is mentioned in historical writings as Izyaslavl. The town's current name derives from this name. In the early Middle Age the town was centre of the Duchy of Zaslawye. In the 11th century, the town was heavily fortified; much of its territory has been designated an archaeological reservation
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Anna Porphyrogeneta
Anna Porphyrogenita
Porphyrogenita
(Greek: Άννα Πορφυρογέννητη, Russian: Анна Византийская, Ukrainian: Анна Порфірогенета; 13 March 963 – 1011) was a Grand Princess consort of Kiev; she was married to Grand Prince Vladimir the Great.[1] Anna was the daughter of Byzantine Emperor
Byzantine Emperor
Romanos II
Romanos II
and the Empress Theophano. She was also the sister of Emperors Basil II
Basil II
Bulgaroktonos (The Bulgar-Slayer) and Constantine VIII. Anna was a Porphyrogenita, a legitimate daughter born in the special purple chamber of the Byzantine Emperor's Palace. Anna's hand was considered such a prize that some theorize that Vladimir became Christian just to marry her.[2] Anna did not wish to marry Vladimir and expressed deep distress on her way to her wedding
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Zasłaŭje
Zaslawye
Zaslawye
or Zaslaŭje (Belarusian: Засла́ўе, [zaˈsɫau̯je]; Russian: Заславль; Polish: Zasław; Lithuanian: Zaslavlis) is a historic city in Minsk
Minsk
Province of Belarus, 20 kilometres northwest of Minsk. In 2009 its population was 14,400.[1]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Sites 4 Notable residents 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] According to chronicles, Zaslawye
Zaslawye
was founded in 985 by Vladimir the Great who sent his wife Rogneda
Rogneda
to live here with their son Izyaslav of Polotsk, the founder of the princely house of Polatsk. It is mentioned in historical writings as Izyaslavl. The town's current name derives from this name. In the early Middle Age the town was centre of the Duchy of Zaslawye. In the 11th century, the town was heavily fortified; much of its territory has been designated an archaeological reservation
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Eastern Orthodox
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe,
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