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Prince Shōtoku
Prince Shōtoku
Prince Shōtoku
(聖徳太子, Shōtoku Taishi, February 7, 574 – April 8, 622[2]), also known as Prince Umayado (厩戸皇子, Umayado no ōji) or Prince Kamitsumiya (上宮皇子, Kamitsumiya no ōji), was a semi-legendary regent and a politician of the Asuka period
Asuka period
in Japan
Japan
who served under Empress Suiko. He was the son of Emperor Yōmei and his consort, Princess Anahobe no Hashihito, who was also Yōmei's younger half-sister. His parents were relatives of the ruling Soga clan[3] and he was involved in the defeat of the rival Mononobe clan.[4] The primary source of the life and accomplishments of Prince Shōtoku comes from the Nihon Shoki. Over successive generations, a devotional cult arose around the figure of Prince Shōtoku
Prince Shōtoku
for the protection of Japan, the Imperial Family, and for Buddhism
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Matsudo, Chiba
Matsudo
Matsudo
(松戸市, Matsudo-shi) is a city located in Chiba Prefecture, Japan. As of February 2016[update], the city has an estimated population of 483,796, and a population density of 7,880 persons per km2
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Kojiki
Kojiki
Kojiki
(古事記, "Records of Ancient Matters" or "An Account of Ancient Matters"), also sometimes read as Furukotofumi,[1] is the oldest extant chronicle in Japan, dating from the early 8th century (711–712) and composed by Ō no Yasumaro
Ō no Yasumaro
at the request of Empress Genmei.[2] The Kojiki
Kojiki
is a collection of myths concerning the origin of the Japanese archipelago, and the Kami
Kami
(神). The myths contained in the Kojiki
Kojiki
as well as the Nihon Shoki
Nihon Shoki
(日本書紀) are part of the inspiration behind many practices
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Kan-on
Kan-on
Kan-on
(漢音, "Han sound") is one of the sources of pronunciation of Japanese kanji. They were borrowed during the Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
(7th to 9th century), introduced by, among others, envoys from Japanese missions to Tang China
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Gifu, Gifu
Gifu
Gifu
(岐阜市, Gifu-shi) is a city located in the south-central portion of Gifu
Gifu
Prefecture, Japan, and serves as the prefectural capital. The city has played an important role in Japan's history because of its location in the middle of the country. During the Sengoku period, various warlords, including Oda Nobunaga, used the area as a base in an attempt to unify and control Japan.[5][6] Gifu continued to flourish even after Japan's unification as both an important shukuba along the Edo period
Edo period
Nakasendō[7] and, later, as one of Japan's fashion centers
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Osaka Prefecture
Osaka
Osaka
Prefecture (大阪府, Ōsaka-fu) is a prefecture located in the Kansai region
Kansai region
on Honshu, the main island of Japan.[1] The capital is the city of Osaka
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Names Of Japan
The word Japan
Japan
is an exonym, and is used (in one form or another) by a large number of languages. The Japanese names for Japan
Japan
are Nippon (にっぽん  listen (help·info)) and Nihon (にほん  listen (help·info)). They are both written in Japanese using the kanji 日本.Contents1 History 2 Historical2.1 Nifon 2.2 Jippon3 Nihon and Nippon3.1 Meaning 3.2 History and evolution 3.3 Modern conventions4 Jipangu 5 Other Names5.1 Classical: 5.2 Non-CJK Names:6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesHistory[edit] Further information: Wa (Japan)Cipangu on the 1453 Fra Mauro map, the first known Western depiction of the island.Both Nippon and Nihon literally mean "the sun's origin", that is, where the sun originates,[1] and are often translated as the Land of the Rising Sun
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Wa (Japan)
Japanese Wa (倭, "Japan, Japanese", from Chinese 倭 Wō) is the oldest recorded name of Japan. Chinese, Korean, and Japanese scribes regularly wrote Wa or Yamato "Japan" with the Chinese character
Chinese character
倭 until the 8th century, when the Japanese replaced it with 和 "harmony, peace, balance."Damyeom-ripbon-wang-heedo (唐閻立本王會圖). 6th century, China. Envoys visiting the Tang Emperor
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Shinto
Shinto
Shinto
(神道, Shintō) or kami-no-michi (among other names)[note 1] is the traditional religion of Japan
Japan
that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day
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Kansai Region
The Kansai region
Kansai region
(関西地方, Kansai-chihō) or the Kinki region (近畿地方, Kinki-chihō) lies in the southern-central region of Japan's main island Honshū.[4] The region includes the prefectures of Mie, Nara, Wakayama, Kyoto, Osaka, Hyōgo and Shiga, sometimes Fukui, Tokushima and Tottori. While the use of the terms "Kansai" and "Kinki" have changed over history, in most modern contexts the use of the two terms is interchangeable
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Yamato Province
Yamato Province
Yamato Province
(大和国, Yamato no Kuni) was a province of Japan, located in Kinai, corresponding to present-day Nara Prefecture
Nara Prefecture
in Honshū.[1] It was also called Washū (和州). At first, the name was written with one different character (大倭; cf. Names of Japan), and for about ten years after 737, this was revised to use more desirable characters (大養徳). The final revision was made in the second year of the Tenpyō-hōji
Tenpyō-hōji
era (c. 758). It is classified as a great province in the Engishiki. The Yamato Period
Yamato Period
in the history of Japan
Japan
refers to the late Kofun Period (c. 250–538) and Asuka Period
Asuka Period
(538–710)
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Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Settsu Province
Settsu Province
Settsu Province
(摂津国, Settsu no kuni) was a province of Japan, which today comprises the southeastern part of Hyōgo Prefecture
Hyōgo Prefecture
and the northern part of Osaka Prefecture.[1] It was also referred to as Tsu Province (津国, Tsu no kuni) or Sesshū (摂州). Osaka and Osaka Castle
Osaka Castle
were the main center of the province. Most of Settsu's area comprises the modern day cities of Osaka and Kōbe.Contents1 History 2 Historical districts 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] During the Sengoku period, the Miyoshi clan ruled Settsu and its neighbors, Izumi and Kawachi, until they were conquered by Oda Nobunaga. The provinces were ruled subsequently by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. The regents of Hideyoshi's son soon quarreled, and when Ishida Mitsunari lost the Battle of Sekigahara, the area was given to relatives of Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Vimalakirti Sutra
The Vimalakīrti Nirdeśa Sūtra (Sanskrit: विमलकीर्तिनिर्देशसूत्र), (Standard Tibetan: འཕགས་པ་དྲི་མ་མེད་པར་གྲགས་པས་བསྟན་པ་ཞེས་བྱ་བ་མདོ།) or Vimalakīrti Sūtra is a Mahayana
Mahayana
Buddhist sutra. Sometimes used in the title, the word nirdeśa means "instruction, advice". The sutra teaches, among other subjects, the meaning of nondualism. It contains a report of a teaching addressed to both arhats and bodhisattvas by the upāsaka (lay practitioner) Vimalakīrti, who expounds the doctrine of śūnyatā to them. This culminates with the wordless teaching of silence. The sutra has been influential in East Asian Buddhism
East Asian Buddhism
for its "brash humor" and flexibility
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Lotus Sutra
The Lotus Sūtra (Sanskrit: सद्धर्मपुण्डरीक सूत्र Saddharma Puṇḍarīka Sūtra, literally "Sūtra on the White Lotus of the Sublime Dharma"[1]) is one of the most popular and influential Mahayana
Mahayana
sutras, and the basis on which the Tiantai, Tendai, Cheontae, and Nichiren
Nichiren
schools of Buddhism
Buddhism
were established
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Ōji, Nara
Ōji (王寺町, Ōji-chō) is a town located in Kitakatsuragi District, Nara Prefecture, Japan. As of April 1, 2015, the town has an estimated population of 22,791 and 9,771 households, and a density of around 3,000 people per km².[1] The total area is 7.00 km².Contents1 Cultural sites 2 Transportation2.1 Rail 2.2 Road3 References 4 External linksCultural sites[edit]Daruma-jiTransportation[edit] Rail[edit]West Japan
Japan
Railway Company Kansai Main Line
Kansai Main Line
(Yamatoji Line): Ōji Station Wakayama Line: Oji Station - Hatakeda StationKintetsu RailwayIkoma Line: Oji Station Tawaramoto Line: Shin-Ōji StationRoad[edit] Japan
Japan
National Route 25 Japan
Japan
National Route 168References[edit]^ "市町村別推計人口・世帯数". Nara Prefecture. April 1, 2015
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