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Prince Of Orange
Prince
Prince
of Orange is a title originally associated with the sovereign Principality of Orange, in what is now southern France. Under the Treaty of Utrecht[3] of 1713, Frederick William I of Prussia
Frederick William I of Prussia
ceded the Principality of Orange
Principality of Orange
to King Louis XIV of France
France
(while retaining the title as part of his dynastic titulature)
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Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons. Politically, the island is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and constitutes most of its territory.[10] Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island
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Occitan
Occitan
Occitan
(English: /ˈɒksɪtən, -tæn, -tɑːn/;[8][9] Occitan: [utsiˈta];[10] French: [ɔksitɑ̃]), also known as lenga d'òc (Occitan: [ˈleŋɡɔ ˈðɔ(k)] ( listen); French: langue d'oc) by its native speakers, is a Romance language. It is spoken in southern France, Italy's Occitan
Occitan
Valleys, Monaco, and Spain's Val d'Aran; collectively, these regions are sometimes referred to as Occitania. Occitan
Occitan
is also spoken in the linguistic enclave of Guardia Piemontese
Guardia Piemontese
(Calabria, Italy). However, there is controversy about the unity of the language, as some think that Occitan
Occitan
is a macrolanguage
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Fief
A fief (/fiːf/; Latin: feudum) was the central element of feudalism and consisted of heritable property or rights granted by an overlord to a vassal who held it in fealty (or "in fee") in return for a form of feudal allegiance and service, usually given by the personal ceremonies of homage and fealty. The fees were often lands or revenue-producing real property held in feudal land tenure: these are typically known as fiefs or fiefdoms
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Holy Roman Empire
The Holy Roman Empire
Roman Empire
(Latin: Sacrum Romanum Imperium; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and continued until its dissolution in 1806.[6] The largest territory of the empire after 962 was the Kingdom of Germany, though it also came to include the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Burgundy, the Kingdom of Italy, and numerous other territories.[7][8][9] On 25 December 800, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish king Charlemagne as Emperor, reviving the title in Western Europe, more than three centuries after the fall of the Western Roman Empire
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King Of Burgundy
The following is a list of the kings of the two Kingdoms of Burgundy, and a number of related political entities devolving from Carolingian machinations over family relations.Contents1 Kings of the Burgundians 2 Burgundy under Frankish kings2.1 Merovingian kings 2.2 Carolingian kings 2.3 Kingdom of Upper Burgundy3 Kingdom of Burgundy
Kingdom of Burgundy
(Arelat) as part of the Holy Roman Empire3.1 Salian (Frankish) dynasty 3.2 Supplinburger 3.3 Staufen (or Hohenstaufen
Hohenstaufen
dynasty) 3.4 Rectorate of Burgundy4 See also 5 ReferencesKings of the Burgundians[edit] The Burgundians
Burgundians
had left Bornholm
Bornholm
c
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William Of Gellone
William of Gellone
William of Gellone
(c. 755 – 28 May 812 or 814 AD), sometimes called William of Orange,[1] was the second Duke of Toulouse from 790 until 811. In 804, he founded the abbey of Gellone. He was canonized a saint in 1066 by Pope Alexander II.[2] In the tenth or eleventh century,[3] a Latin hagiography, the Vita sancti Willelmi, was composed based on oral traditions. By the twelfth century, William's legend had grown. He is the hero of an entire cycle of chansons de geste, the earliest of which is the Chanson de Guillaume of about 1140. In the chansons, he is nicknamed Fièrebrace (wild arm) on account of his strength and the marquis au court nez (margrave with the short nose) on account of an injury suffered in battle with a giant.Contents1 William in history 2 William in romance 3 References 4 External linksWilliam in history[edit] William was born in northern France
France
in the mid-8th century
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Charles Martel
Charles Martel
Charles Martel
(c. 686 – 22 October 741) was a Frankish statesman and military leader who as Duke and Prince of the Franks and Mayor of the Palace, was de facto ruler of Francia
Francia
from 718 until his death.[2][3][4] The son of the Frankish statesman Pepin of Herstal
Pepin of Herstal
and a noblewoman named Alpaida, Charles successfully asserted his claims to power as successor to his father as the power behind the throne in Frankish politics
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Charlemagne
Charlemagne
Charlemagne
(/ˈʃɑːrləmeɪn/) or Charles
Charles
the Great[a] (2 April 742[1][b] – 28 January 814), numbered Charles
Charles
I, was King of the Franks
Franks
from 768, King of the Lombards
Lombards
from 774 and Holy Roman Emperor from 800. He united much of western and central Europe during the early Middle Ages. He was the first recognised emperor to rule from western Europe since the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
three centuries earlier.[2] The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded is called the Carolingian
Carolingian
Empire
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Marca Hispanica
The Marca Hispanica
Marca Hispanica
(Spanish: Marca Hispánica, Catalan: Marca Hispànica, Aragonese and Occitan: Marca Hispanica, Basque: Hispaniako Marka, French: Marche d'Espagne), also known as the March of Barcelona, was a military buffer zone beyond the former province of Septimania, created by Charlemagne
Charlemagne
in 795 as a defensive barrier between the Umayyad
Umayyad
Moors
Moors
of Al-Andalus
Al-Andalus
and the Frankish Carolingian Empire (Duchy of Gascony, the Duchy of Aquitaine
Duchy of Aquitaine
and Carolingian Septimania). In its broader meaning, Marca Hispanica
Marca Hispanica
sometimes refers to a group of early Iberian and trans-Pyrenean lordships or counts coming under Frankish rule
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Count Of Toulouse
The Count of Toulouse
Toulouse
was the ruler of Toulouse
Toulouse
during the 8th to 13th centuries. Originating as vassals of the Frankish kings,[1] the hereditary counts ruled the city of Toulouse
Toulouse
and its surrounding county from the late 9th century until 1270. The counts and other family members were also at various times counts of Quercy, Rouergue, Albi, and Nîmes, and sometimes margraves (military defenders of the Holy Roman Empire) of Septimania
Septimania
and Provence
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Mailly-Maillet
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Mailly-Maillet is a commune in the Somme department in Hauts-de-France in northern France.Contents1 Geography 2 Population 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit] The commune is situated on the D919 road, about 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Abbeville. It is close to the area of the Battle of the Somme. Population[edit]Historical population of Mailly-MailletYear 1962 1968 1975 1982 1990 1999 2006Population 657 675 657 620 639 604 613From the year 1962 on: No double counting—residents of multiple communes (e.g
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Septimania
Septimania
Septimania
(French: Septimanie, IPA: [sɛptimani]; Occitan: Septimània, IPA: [septiˈmanjɔ]; Catalan: Septimània, IPA: [səptiˈmaniə]) was the western region of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis
Gallia Narbonensis
that passed under the control of the Visigoths
Visigoths
in 462, when Septimania
Septimania
was ceded to their king, Theodoric II. Under the Visigoths
Visigoths
it was known as simply Gallia or Narbonensis. It corresponded roughly with the former administrative region of Languedoc-Roussillon
Languedoc-Roussillon
of modern France
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Chanson De Geste
The chanson de geste, /ʃɑːnˈsɔːn də ˈʒɛst/ Old French
Old French
for "song of heroic deeds" (from gesta: Latin: "deeds, actions accomplished"[1]), is a medieval narrative, a type of epic poem that appears at the dawn of French literature.[2] The earliest known poems of this genre date from the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries, before the emergence of the lyric poetry of the trouvères (troubadours) and the earliest verse romances. They reached their apogee in the period 1150–1250.[3] Composed in verse, these narrative poems of moderate length (averaging 4000 lines[4]) were originally sung, or (later) recited, by minstrels or jongleurs
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Chanson De Guillaume
The Chanson de Guillaume or Chançun de Willame (English: "Song of William") is a chanson de geste from the first half of the twelfth-century (c.1140,[1] although the first half of the poem may date from as early as the eleventh century;[1][2] along with The Song of Roland
Roland
and Gormont et Isembart, it is considered one of three chansons de geste whose composition incontestably dates from before 1150[3])
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Orbieu
The Orbieu is a 84.3-kilometre (52.4 mi) long river in the Aude département, in south central France. Its source is at Fourtou, in the Corbières. It flows generally northeast. It is a right tributary of the Aude into which it flows between Raissac-d'Aude and Marcorignan, 10 kilometres (6 mi) northwest of Narbonne. Communes along its course[edit] This list is ordered from source to mouth: Fourtou, Auriac, Lanet, Montjoi, Vignevieille, Mayronnes, Saint-Martin-des-Puits, Saint-Pierre-des-Champs, Lagrasse, Ribaute, Camplong-d'Aude, Fabrezan, Ferrals-les-Corbières, Lézignan-Corbières, Luc-sur-Orbieu, Cruscades, Ornaisons, Névian, Villedaigne, Raissac-d'Aude, Marcorignan Notes[edit]This article is based on the equivalent article from the French Wikipedia, consulted on 29 April 2009.References[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Orbieu.http://www.geoportail.fr The Orbieu at the Sandre databaseThis Aude geographical article is a stub
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