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Prince Henry Of Portugal
Infante D. Henrique of Portugal, Duke of Viseu
Duke of Viseu
(4 March 1394 – 13 November 1460), better known as Prince Henry the Navigator (Portuguese: Infante Dom Henrique, o Navegador), was a central figure in the early days of the Portuguese Empire
Portuguese Empire
and in the 15th-century European maritime discoveries and maritime expansion. Through his administrative direction, he is regarded as the main initiator of what would be known as the Age of Discovery. Henry was the third[1] child of the Portuguese king John I and responsible for the early development of Portuguese exploration and maritime trade with other continents through the systematic exploration of Western Africa, the islands of the Atlantic Ocean, and the search for new routes. King John I founded the House of Aviz
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Prince William Frederick Henry Of The Netherlands
Prince William Frederick Henry of the Netherlands (Dutch: Willem Frederik Hendrik; 13 June 1820 – 14 January 1879) was the third son of King William II of the Netherlands and his wife, Grand Duchess Anna Pavlovna of Russia. He was born at Soestdijk Palace. Prince Henry became Governor of Luxembourg in 1850, in which capacity he served until his death in 1879. During his tenure, he worked with the government to launch the reactionary Coup of 1856, which consolidated power in the monarchy and the executive.[1] However, most of the changes were reversed by the new constitution issued in 1868 after the 1867 Luxembourg Crisis,[1] during which the crown tried to sell the grand duchy to France.Contents1 Personal life 2 Ancestry 3 See also 4 Footnotes 5 External linksPersonal life[edit]Henry portrayed youngA bust of Prince Henry in AmsterdamHe married twice
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African Slave Trade
Slavery
Slavery
has historically been widespread in Africa, and still continues today in some countries. Systems of servitude and slavery were common in parts of Africa, as they were in much of the ancient world. In many African societies where slavery was prevalent, the enslaved people were not treated as chattel slaves and were given certain rights in a system similar to indentured servitude elsewhere in the world
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Luís De Sousa (writer)
Frei Luís de Sousa (Manoel or Manuel de Sousa Coutinho) (1555 – 5 May 1632), a Portuguese monk and prose-writer, was born at Santarém, a member of the noble family of Sousa Coutinho.Contents1 Capture and release 2 In Portugal 3 To Madrid 4 Writing 5 Poetry 6 Authorities 7 ReferencesCapture and release[edit] In 1576, he broke off his studies at Coimbra University to join the order of Malta, and shortly afterwards was captured at sea by Barbary pirates and taken prisoner to Argel, where he met Cervantes. A year later, Manuel de Sousa Coutinho was ransomed, and landing on the coast of Aragon passed through Valencia, where he made the acquaintance of the poet Jaime Falcão, who seems to have inspired him with a taste for study and a quiet life. The national disasters and family troubles increased his desire, which was confirmed when he returned to Portugal after the Battle of Alcácer Quibir
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Egyptian Pyramids
The Egyptian pyramids
Egyptian pyramids
are ancient pyramid-shaped masonry structures located in Egypt. As of November 2008, sources cite either 118 or 138 as the number of identified Egyptian pyramids.[1][2] Most were built as tombs for the country's pharaohs and their consorts during the Old and Middle Kingdom periods.[3][4][5] The earliest known Egyptian pyramids
Egyptian pyramids
are found at Saqqara, northwest of Memphis. The earliest among these is the Pyramid of Djoser (constructed 2630 BC–2611 BC) which was built during the third dynasty. This pyramid and its surrounding complex were designed by the architect Imhotep, and are generally considered to be the world's oldest monumental structures constructed of dressed masonry.[6] The most famous Egyptian pyramids
Egyptian pyramids
are those found at Giza, on the outskirts of Cairo
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Giza
Giza
Giza
(/ˈɡiːzə/; sometimes spelled Gizah or Jizah; Arabic: الجيزة‎ al-Jīzah; Coptic: ϯⲡⲉⲣⲥⲏⲥ, ⲅⲓⲍⲁ Tiperses, Giza) is the third-largest city in Egypt
Egypt
and the capital of the Giza
Giza
Governorate. It is located on the west bank of the Nile, 5 km (3 mi) southwest of central Cairo
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Henry IV Of England
Henry IV (15 April 1367[1] – 20 March 1413), also known as Henry Bolingbroke (/ˈbɒlɪŋbrʊk/), was King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland
Ireland
from 1399 to 1413, and asserted the claim of his grandfather, Edward III, to the Kingdom of France. Henry was born at Bolingbroke Castle
Bolingbroke Castle
in Lincolnshire
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Mint (coin)
A mint is an industrial facility which manufactures coins that can be used in currency. The history of mints correlates closely with the history of coins. In the beginning, hammered coinage or cast coinage were the chief means of coin minting, with resulting production runs numbering as little as the hundreds or thousands. In modern mints, coin dies are manufactured in large numbers and planchets are made into milled coins by the billions. With the mass production of currency, the production cost is weighed when minting coins
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Casa Do Infante
The Casa do Infante (House of the Prince), or alternately as the Alfândega Velha (Old Customshouse) is a historical house in the civil parish of Cedofeita, Santo Ildefonso, Sé, Miragaia, São Nicolau e Vitória, in the municipality of Porto, in northern Portuguese. The house was originally built in the 14th century as customs and mint, although its present condition derives mostly from a remodelling carried out in the 17th century. Its name derived from an oral tradition that suggested the house was the birthplace of Prince Henry the Navigator in 1394
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Fort Of Leça De Palmeira
The Fort of Leça da Palmeira
Leça da Palmeira
(Portuguese: Forte de Leça da Palmeira), or alternately the Castle of Matosinhos (Portuguese: Castelo de Matosinhos) is a 17th-century fort located in civil parish of Leça da Palmeira, municipality of Matosinhos in the Greater Porto region of Portugal. History[edit]The manicured grounds of the fort, showing the battlements and barbicansThe fort was begun in 1638 in the area known as Santa Catarina by João Sá e Meneses, then Count of Penaguião, which they initially designated as the Forte de Nossa Senhora das Neves da Barra de Leça (Fort of Our Layd of the Snow
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Conquest Of Ceuta
The conquest of Ceuta (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈθeuta]) by the Portuguese on 21 August 1415 marks an important step in the beginning of the Portuguese Empire in Africa.Contents1 History 2 In popular culture 3 Notes 4 References 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Shortly after the conquest of the region by the Arabs from the Byzantine Empire, Ceuta served as a staging ground in the Umayyad conquest of Hispania in 711, but it was destroyed in 740 and only rebuilt in the 9th century, passing to the Caliphate of Córdoba in the 10th century. In the subsequent centuries it remained under the rule of the Almoravids and Almohades as well as various Andalusian Taifas. Prior to its capture by the Portuguese, Ceuta had seen a period of political instability in previous decades, under competing interests from the Marinid Empire and the Kingdom of Granada.[n. 1] The chief promoter of the Ceuta expedition was João Afonso, royal overseer of finance
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Morocco
Coordinates: 32°N 6°W / 32°N 6°W / 32; -6Kingdom of Moroccoالمملكة المغربية (Arabic) ⵜⴰⴳⵍⴷⵉⵜ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ (Berber)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  لله، الوطن، الملك  (Arabic) Allah, Al Watan, Al Malik ⴰⴽⵓⵛ, ⴰⵎⵓⵔ, ⴰⴳⵍⵍⵉⴷ (Berber)"God, Homeland, King"Anthem:  النشيد الوطني المغربي  (Arabic) ⵉⵣⵍⵉ ⴰⵏⴰⵎⵓⵔ ⵏ ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ  (Berber) Cherifian AnthemDark green: Internationally recognized territory of Morocco. Lighter green: Western Sahara, a territory claimed and mostly controlled by Morocco
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Barbary Pirate
The Barbary pirates, sometimes called Barbary corsairs or Ottoman corsairs, were Ottoman pirates and privateers who operated from North Africa, based primarily in the ports of Salé, Rabat, Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli. This area was known in Europe
Europe
as the Barbary Coast, a term derived from the name of its Berber inhabitants. Their predation extended throughout the Mediterranean, south along West Africa's Atlantic
Atlantic
seaboard and even South America,[1] and into the North Atlantic
Atlantic
as far north as Iceland, but they primarily operated in the western Mediterranean
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West Africa
West
West
Africa, also called Western Africa
Africa
and the West
West
of Africa, is the westernmost region of Africa
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Gomes Eanes De Zurara
Gomes Eanes de Zurara (c. 1410 – c. 1474), sometimes spelled Eannes or Azurara, was a Portuguese chronicler of the Age of Discovery, the most notable after Fernão Lopes.Contents1 Life and career 2 Chronicles 3 Chronicle of the Henrican Discoveries 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife and career[edit] Gomes Eanes de Zurara adopted the career of letters in middle life. He probably entered the royal library as assistant to Fernão Lopes during the reign of King Edward of Portugal (1433–1438), and he had sole charge of it in 1452. His Chronicle of the Siege and Capture of Ceuta, a supplement (third part) to Lopes's Chronicle of King John I, dates from 1450, and three years later he completed the first draft of the Chronicle of the Discovery and Conquest of Guinea, our authority for the early Portuguese voyages of discovery down the African coast and in the ocean, more especially for those undertaken under the auspices of Prince Henry the Navigator
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Caravel
A caravel (Portuguese: caravela, IPA: [kɐɾɐˈvɛlɐ]) is a small, highly maneuverable sailing ship developed in the 15th century by the Portuguese to explore along the West African coast and into the Atlantic Ocean. The lateen sails gave it speed and the capacity for sailing windward (beating). Caravels were used by the Portuguese for the oceanic exploration voyages during the 15th and 16th centuries in the Age of Discovery
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