HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Prelate
A prelate is a high-ranking member of the clergy who is an ordinary or who ranks in precedence with ordinaries. The word derives from the Latin
Latin
prælatus, the past participle of præferre, which means "carry before", "be set above or over" or "prefer"; hence, a prelate is one set over others. The archetypal prelate is a bishop, whose prelature is his particular church. All other prelates, including the regular prelates such as abbots and major superiors, are based upon this original model of prelacy.Contents1 Related terminology 2 Territorial prelatures 3 Personal prelatures 4 Controversies Surrounding Retired Prelates 5 See also 6 ReferencesRelated terminology[edit] In a general sense, a prelate in the Catholic Church and other Christian churches is a bishop or another ecclesiastical person having ordinary authority over a jurisdiction equivalent to a diocese or a similar jurisdiction (e.g
[...More...]

"Prelate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anglicanism
Anglicanism
Anglicanism
is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England
Church of England
following the Protestant Reformation.[1] Adherents of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion,[2] which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic
Catholic
Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.[3] They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals")
[...More...]

"Anglicanism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Apostolic Constitution
A constitution is a set of fundamental principles or established precedents according to which a state or other organization is governed.[1] These rules together make up, i.e. constitute, what the entity is. When these principles are written down into a single document or set of legal documents, those documents may be said to embody a written constitution; if they are written down in a single comprehensive document, it is said to embody a codified constitution. Some constitutions (such as the constitution of the United Kingdom) are uncodified, but written in numerous fundamental Acts of a legislature, court cases or treaties.[2] Constitutions concern different levels of organizations, from sovereign states to companies and unincorporated associations. A treaty which establishes an international organization is also its constitution, in that it would define how that organization is constituted
[...More...]

"Apostolic Constitution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theology
Theology
Theology
is the critical study of the nature of the divine
[...More...]

"Theology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Motu Proprio
Corpus Juris CanoniciDecretist Regulæ Juris Decretals of Gregory IXDecretalistDecretum Gratiani Extravagantes Liber SeptimusAncient Church OrdersDidache The Apostolic ConstitutionsCanons of the ApostlesCollections of ancient canonsCollectiones canonum Dionysianae Collectio canonum quadripartita Collectio canonum Quesnelliana Collectio canonum WigorniensisOtherPseudo-Isidorian Decretals Benedictus Deus (Pius IV) Contractum trinius Defect of Birth Jus exclusivae Papal appointmentOriental lawCode of Canons of the Eastern Churches Eastern Canonical Reforms of Pius XII Nomocanon ArcheparchyEparchyLiturgical lawEcclesia Dei Mysterii Paschalis Sacrosanctum conciliumMusicam sacramSummorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudiniSacramental lawCanon 844 Ex opere operato Omnium in mentem Valid but illicitHoly OrdersImpediment (canon law)Abstemius


[...More...]

"Motu Proprio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Diocese
The word diocese (/ˈdaɪəsɪs, -siːs, -siːz/)[a] is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration". When now used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to an administrative territorial entity.[2] In the Western Church, the district is under the supervision of a bishop (who may have assistant bishops to help him or her) and is divided into parishes under the care of priests; but in the Eastern Church, the word denotes the area under the jurisdiction of a patriarch and the bishops under his jurisdiction administer parishes.[2] This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity. The word diocesan means relating or pertaining to a diocese. It can also be used as a noun meaning the bishop who has the principal supervision of a diocese
[...More...]

"Diocese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Second Vatican Council
Four Constitutions: Sacrosanctum Concilium
Sacrosanctum Concilium
(Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy) Lumen gentium
Lumen gentium
(Dogmatic Constitution on the Church)
[...More...]

"Second Vatican Council" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pope John Paul II
Pope
Pope
Saint
Saint
John Paul II (Latin: Ioannes Paulus II; Italian: Giovanni Paolo II; Polish: Jan Paweł II; born Karol Józef Wojtyła;[a] [ˈkarɔl ˈjuzɛv vɔjˈtɨwa];[b] 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) served as Pope
Pope
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and sovereign of Vatican City from 1978 to 2005. He is called Saint
Saint
John Paul the Great by some Catholics.[6][7][8] He was elected by the second Papal conclave of 1978, which was called after Pope
Pope
John Paul I, who had been elected in August to succeed Pope Paul VI, died after thirty-three days
[...More...]

"Pope John Paul II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin Catholic Church
The Latin Church, sometimes called the Western Church, is the largest particular church sui iuris in full communion with the Pope
Pope
and the rest of the Catholic Church, tracing its history to the earliest days of Christianity. Employing the Latin liturgical rites, with 1.255 billion members (2015), the Latin Church
Latin Church
is the original and still major part of Western Christianity,[2] in contrast to the Eastern Catholic churches. It is headquartered in the Vatican City, enclaved in Rome, Italy. Historically, the leadership of the Latin Church, i.e., the Holy See, has been viewed as one of the five patriarchates of the Pentarchy
Pentarchy
of early Christianity, along with the patriarchates of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem
[...More...]

"Latin Catholic Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holy See
The Holy See
Holy See
(Italian: Santa Sede; Latin: Sancta Sedes; Ecclesiastical Latin: [ˈsaŋkta ˈsedes]), also referred to as the See of Rome, is the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in Rome, the episcopal see of the Pope, and an independent sovereign entity. It serves as the central point of reference for the Catholic Church everywhere and the focal point of communion due to its position as the pre-eminent episcopal see of the universal church. Today, it is responsible for the governance of all Catholics, organised in their Particular Churches, Patriarchates and religious institutes. As an independent sovereign entity, holding the Vatican City
Vatican City
enclave in Rome
Rome
as an independent state, it maintains diplomatic relations with other states
[...More...]

"Holy See" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
[...More...]

"Roman Catholic Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Curia
The Roman Curia
Curia
is the administrative apparatus of the Holy See[a] and the central body through which the Roman Pontiff
Roman Pontiff
conducts the affairs of the universal Catholic Church
[...More...]

"Roman Curia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
(from the Latin
Latin
ius, iuris meaning "law" and dicere meaning "to speak") is the practical authority granted to a legal body to administer justice within a defined field of responsibility, e.g., Michigan tax law. In federations like the United States, areas of jurisdiction apply to local, state, and federal levels; e.g. the court has jurisdiction to apply federal law. Colloquially it is used to refer to the geographical area to which such authority applies, e.g. the court has jurisdiction over all of Colorado
[...More...]

"Jurisdiction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ordinariate For The Faithful Of Eastern Rite
An ordinariate for the faithful of Eastern rite is a geographical ecclesiastical structure for Eastern Catholic communities in areas where no eparchy of their own particular Church has been established. This structure was introduced by the apostolic letter Officium supremi Apostolatus of 15 July 1912.[1] In the Annuario Pontificio
Annuario Pontificio
the eight existing ordinariates of this kind are listed together with the fifteen (pre-diocesan) apostolic exarchates. Of these ordinariates, four (in Argentina, Brazil, France and Poland) are generically for all Eastern Catholics who lack a 'proper' diocesan jurisdiction of their own rite in the particular country and who are therefore entrusted to the care of a Latin Archbishop
Archbishop
in the country. The one in Austria
Austria
is for Catholics belonging to any of the fourteen particular Churches that use the Byzantine Rite
[...More...]

"Ordinariate For The Faithful Of Eastern Rite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Religious Institute
In the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
a religious institute is "a society in which members...pronounce public vows...and lead a life of brothers or sisters in common".[1] Consecrated life
Consecrated life
may be lived either individually or as a member of an institute. The Catholic Church
Catholic Church
recognises, as forms of individual consecrated life, that of a hermit and that of a consecrated virgin.[2] It also envisages new forms of consecrated life emerging.[3] Religious institutes are one of the two types of institutes of consecrated life
[...More...]

"Religious Institute" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Particular Church
A particular church (Latin: ecclesia particularis) is a hierarchically ordered ecclesiastical community of faithful headed by a bishop (or equivalent), as defined by Catholic canon law
Catholic canon law
and ecclesiology. Liturgical rite depend on the bishop, i.e the particular church. Though closely related, in this context "church" thus refers to the institution, and "rite" to its practices. Then again, there are two kinds of particular churches:An autonomous particular church, or particular church sui iuris: an aggregation of particular churches with specific liturgical rites along distinctive theological, liturgical, spiritual and canonical traditions.[1] The largest such autonomous particular church is the Latin
Latin
Church, while the other 23 are referred to collectively as the Eastern Catholic Churches, some of which are headed by bishops who have the title and rank of Patriarch
Patriarch
or Major Archbishop
[...More...]

"Particular Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.