HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Preces
Preces ( Latin
Latin
preces, plural of prex, "prayer") are, in liturgical worship, short petitions that are said or sung as versicle and response by the officiant and congregation respectively
[...More...]

"Preces" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sanctus
The Sanctus
Sanctus
(Latin: Sanctus, "Holy") is a hymn in Christian liturgy. It may also be called the epinikios hymnos (Greek: ἐπινίκιος ὕμνος, " Hymn
Hymn
of Victory") when referring to the Greek rendition. In Western Christianity, the Sanctus
Sanctus
forms part of the Ordinary and is sung (or said) as the final words of the Preface of the Eucharistic Prayer, the prayer of consecration of the bread and wine. The preface, which alters according to the season, usually concludes with words describing the praise of the worshippers joining with the angels, who are pictured as praising God with the words of the Sanctus
[...More...]

"Sanctus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Breviary
The Breviary
Breviary
(Latin: breviarium) is a book in many Western Christian denominations that "contains all the liturgical texts for the Office, whether said in choir or in private."[1] Historically, different breviaries were used in the various parts of Christendom, such as Aberdeen Breviary, Belleville Breviary, Stowe Breviary
[...More...]

"Breviary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lent
Lent
Lent
(Latin: Quadragesima: Fortieth) is a solemn religious observance in the Christian liturgical calendar that begins on Ash Wednesday
Ash Wednesday
and ends approximately six weeks later, before Easter
Easter
Sunday
[...More...]

"Lent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Easter
Easter,[nb 1] also called Pascha (Greek, Latin)[nb 2] or Resurrection Sunday,[3][4] is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
from the dead, described in the New Testament
New Testament
as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary
Calvary
c
[...More...]

"Easter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ordinary Time
Ordinary Time
Ordinary Time
refers to two periods of time in the Christian liturgical year that are found in the calendar of the ordinary form of the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
of the Catholic Church, as well as some other churches of Western Christianity, including those that use the Revised Common Lec
[...More...]

"Ordinary Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

General Intercessions
The General Intercessions or Universal Prayer or Prayer of the Faithful are a series of prayers which form part of the liturgy in the Anglican, Catholic, Lutheran, Methodist and other Western Liturgical Churches.Contents1 Roman Rite 2 History 3 Liturgy of the Hours 4 ReferencesRoman Rite[edit] Main article: Roman Rite These prayers are said at the conclusion of the Liturgy of the Word or Mass of the Catechumens (the older term). The General Instruction of the Roman Missal
Roman Missal
states:In the General Intercessions or the Prayer of the Faithful, the people respond in a certain way to the word of God which they have welcomed in faith and, exercising the office of their baptismal priesthood, offer prayers to God for the salvation of all
[...More...]

"General Intercessions" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mass
Mass
Mass
is both a property of a physical body and a measure of its resistance to acceleration (a change in its state of motion) when a net force is applied.[1] It also determines the strength of its mutual gravitational attraction to other bodies. The basic SI unit
SI unit
of mass is the kilogram (kg). In physics, mass is not the same as weight, even though mass is often determined by measuring the object's weight using a spring scale, rather than balance scale comparing it directly with known masses. An object on the Moon
Moon
would weigh less than it does on Earth
Earth
because of the lower gravity, but it would still have the same mass. This is because weight is a force, while mass is the property that (along with gravity) determines the strength of this force. In Newtonian physics, mass can be generalized as the amount of matter in an object
[...More...]

"Mass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Breviary
The Roman Breviary
Breviary
(Latin: Breviarium Romanum) is the liturgical book of the Latin liturgical rites
Latin liturgical rites
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
containing the public or canonical prayers, hymns, the Psalms, readings, and notations for everyday use, especially by bishops, priests, and deacons in the Divine Office (i.e., at the canonical hours or Liturgy of the Hours, the Christians' daily prayer). The word breviary, in general, refers to a collection of Christian orders of prayers and readings, such as contained in Anglican
Anglican
or Lutheran
Lutheran
resources. It may also be used to refer to an abridged version of any text or a brief account or summary of some subject, but is primarily used to refer to a Christian liturgical book
[...More...]

"Roman Breviary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Prime (liturgy)
Prime, or the First Hour, is a fixed time of prayer of the traditional Divine Office (Canonical Hours), said at the first hour of daylight (approximately 6:00 a.m.), between the morning Hour of Lauds and the 9 a.m. Hour of Terce. It is part of the Christian liturgies of Eastern Christianity, but in the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
it was suppressed by the liturgical reforms following the Second Vatican Council.[1] However, clergy who have an obligation to celebrate the Liturgy of the Hours may still fulfil their obligation by using the Roman Breviary promulgated by Pope John XXIII
Pope John XXIII
in 1962,[2] which contains the Hour of Prime. Like all the liturgical hours, except the Office of Readings, it consists primarily of Psalms
[...More...]

"Prime (liturgy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vespers
Vespers
Vespers
is a sunset evening prayer service in the Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Eastern Catholic, Anglican, and Lutheran liturgies of the canonical hours. The word comes from the Greek ἑσπέρα ("hespera") and the Latin
Latin
vesper, meaning "evening"
[...More...]

"Vespers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Creed
A creed (also known as a confession, symbol, or statement of faith) is a statement of the shared beliefs of a religious community in the form of a fixed formula summarizing core tenets. One of the most widely used creeds in Christianity
Christianity
is the Nicene Creed, first formulated in AD 325 at the First Council of Nicaea. It was based on Christian understanding of the Canonical Gospels, the letters of the New Testament
New Testament
and to a lesser extent the Old Testament. Affirmation of this creed, which describes the Trinity, is generally taken as a fundamental test of orthodoxy for most Christian denominations.[1] The Apostles' Creed
Apostles' Creed
is also broadly accepted
[...More...]

"Creed" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lord's Prayer
The Lord's Prayer
Lord's Prayer
(also called the Our Father or Pater Noster, among other names) is a venerated Christian prayer
Christian prayer
that, according to the New Testament, Jesus
Jesus
taught as the way to pray.[1] Two versions of this prayer are recorded: the long form in the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
in the middle of the Sermon
Sermon
on the Mount, and the short form in the Gospel of Luke
Gospel of Luke
when "one of his disciples said to him, 'Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.'"[2] The first three of the seven petitions in Matthew address God; the other four are related to human needs and concerns. The Matthew account alone includes the "Your will be done" and the "Rescue us from the evil one" (or "Deliver us from evil") petitions
[...More...]

"Lord's Prayer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sign Of The Cross
The sign of the cross (Latin: signum crucis), or blessing oneself or crossing oneself, is a ritual blessing made by members of most branches of Christianity. This blessing is made by the tracing of an upright cross or + across the body with the right hand, often accompanied by spoken or mental recitation of the trinitarian formula: "In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen."[1] The movement is the tracing of the shape of a cross in the air or on one's own body, echoing the traditional shape of the cross of the Christian
Christian
crucifixion narrative
[...More...]

"Sign Of The Cross" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mozarabic Rite
The Mozarabic Rite, also called the Visigothic Rite or the Hispanic Rite, is a continuing form of Christian
Christian
worship within the Latin Catholic Church, also adopted by the Western Rite liturgical family of the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
and in the Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church.[1] Its beginning dates to the 7th century, and is localized in the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
(Hispania). "Mozarab" is a modern historical term used to refer to Christians that lived under Muslim
Muslim
rulers in Al-Andalus. The Visigothic/Mozarabic Rite's origins predates the Al-Andalus
Al-Andalus
to the time of the Christian
Christian
Visigothic Kingdom
[...More...]

"Mozarabic Rite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prelature
A prelate is a high-ranking member of the clergy who is an ordinary or who ranks in precedence with ordinaries. The word derives from the Latin
Latin
prælatus, the past participle of præferre, which means "carry before", "be set above or over" or "prefer"; hence, a prelate is one set over others. The archetypal prelate is a bishop, whose prelature is his particular church. All other prelates, including the regular prelates such as abbots and major superiors, are based upon this original model of prelacy.Contents1 Related terminology 2 Territorial prelatures 3 Personal prelatures 4 Controversies Surrounding Retired Prelates 5 See also 6 ReferencesRelated terminology[edit] In a general sense, a prelate in the Catholic Church and other Christian churches is a bishop or another ecclesiastical person having ordinary authority over a jurisdiction equivalent to a diocese or a similar jurisdiction (e.g
[...More...]

"Prelature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.