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Preaching
A sermon is an oration, lecture, or talk by a member of a religious institution or clergy. Sermons address a Biblical, theological, religious, or moral topic, usually expounding on a type of belief, law or behavior within both past and present contexts. Elements of the sermon often include exposition, exhortation and practical application. In Christianity, a sermon is usually delivered in a place of worship from an elevated architectural feature, variously known as a pulpit, a lectern, or an ambo. The word "sermon" comes from a Middle English word which was derived from Old French, which in turn came from the Latin word sermō meaning "discourse". The word can mean "conversation", which could mean that early sermons were delivered in the form of question and answer, and that only later did it come to mean a monologue
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Sermon (other)
A sermon is an oration by a prophet or member of the clergy. Sermon
Sermon
may also refer to: People[edit] Sermon
Sermon
(ruler), 11th-century ruler of Srem, vassal of Samuil of Bulgaria Erick Sermon, American hip hop musician and record producer Paul Sermon, Professo
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Early Christianity
Early Christianity
Christianity
is the period of Christianity
Christianity
preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325. It is typically divided into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period
Ante-Nicene Period
(from the Apostolic Age
Apostolic Age
until Nicea). The first Christians, as described in the first chapters of the Acts of the Apostles, were all Jews
Jews
either by birth or conversion, for which the biblical term "proselyte" is used,[1] and referred to by historians as Jewish Christians
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History Of Christian Theology
The doctrine of the Trinity, considered the core of Christian
Christian
theology by Trinitarians, is the result of continuous exploration by the church of the biblical data, thrashed out in debate and treatises, eventually formulated at the First Council of Nicaea
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Patriology
In Christian
Christian
theology, term Patriology
Patriology
refers to the study of the God the Father. The word Patriology
Patriology
comes from two Greek words: πατέρας (pateras, father) and λογος (logos, teaching about). As a theological discipline, Patriology
Patriology
is closely connected to Christology
Christology
(study of Christ
Christ
as God the Son) and Pneumatology (study of Holy Ghost as God the Spirit). The term Patriology
Patriology
should not be confused with similar term Patrology that involves the study of teachings of the Church Fathers. There are three basic forms of the name of God the Father
God the Father
in the New Testament: Theos (θεός the Greek woed for God), Kyrios
Kyrios
(i.e. Lord in Greek) and Pateras (πατέρας i.e
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Pneumatology (Christianity)
Pneumatology in Christianity
Christianity
refers to a particular discipline within Christian theology
Christian theology
that focuses on the study of the Holy Spirit. The term is essentially derived from the Greek word Pneuma (πνεῦμα), which designates "breath" or "spirit" and metaphorically describes a non-material being or influence. The English term pneumatology comes from two Greek words: πνευμα (pneuma, spirit) and λογος (logos, teaching about)
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Salvation In Christianity
Salvation
Salvation
in Christianity, or deliverance, is the saving of the soul from sin and its consequences.[1] Variant views on salvation are among the main fault lines dividing the various Christian denominations, being a point of disagreement between Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism
Roman Catholicism
and Protestantism, as well as within Protestantism, notably in the Calvinist–Arminian debate
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History Of Christianity
The history of Christianity
Christianity
concerns the Christian religion, Christendom, and the Church with its various denominations, from the 1st century to the present. Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
and Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Christianity
spread to all of Europe in the Middle Ages. Christianity
Christianity
expanded throughout the world and became the world's largest religion due to European colonialism.[1] Today there are more than two billion Christians worldwide.[2]Contents1 Early Christianity
Christianity
(c
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Christian Tradition
Christian tradition is a collection of traditions consisting of practices or beliefs associated with Christianity. These ecclesiastical traditions have more or less authority based on the nature of the practices or beliefs and on the group in question. Many churches have traditional practices, such as particular patterns of worship or rites, that developed over time. Deviations from such patterns are sometimes considered unacceptable or heretical. Similarly, traditions can be stories or history that are or were widely accepted without being part of Christian doctrine, e.g., the crucifixion of Saint Peter
Saint Peter
or the evangelistic activity of Thomas the Apostle in India, which are widely believed to have happened but are not recorded in scripture
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Mary, Mother Of Jesus
Mary (Greek: Μαρία, translit. María; Aramaic: ܡܪܝܡ‎, translit. Mariam; Hebrew: מִרְיָם‎, translit. Miriam; Coptic: Ⲙⲁⲣⲓⲁ; Arabic: مريم‎, translit. Maryam), also known by various titles, styles and honorifics, was a 1st-century BC Galilean Jewish[2] woman of Nazareth, and the mother of Jesus, according to the New Testament[3][4][5][6] and the Quran.[7][8] The gospels of Matthew and Luke in the New Testament
New Testament
and the Quran describe Mary as a virgin (Greek: παρθένος, translit. parthénos)[9] and many[which?] Christians believe that she conceived her son while a virgin by the Holy Spirit
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Apostles
In Christian theology
Christian theology
and ecclesiology, the apostles (Greek: ἀπόστολος, translit. apóstolos, lit. 'one who is sent away'), particularly the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
(also known as the Twelve Disciples or simply the Twelve), were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity. During the life and ministry of Jesus
Jesus
in the 1st century AD, the apostles were his closest followers and became the primary teachers of the gospel message of Jesus. The word disciple is sometimes used interchangeably with apostle; for instance, the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
makes no distinction between the two terms[citation needed]. In modern usage, prominent missionaries are often called apostles, a practice which stems from the Latin
Latin
equivalent of apostle, i.e. missio, the source of the English word missionary
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Church Fathers
The Church Fathers, Early Church
Early Church
Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and generally influential Christian theologians, some of whom were eminent teachers and great bishops. The term is used of writers or teachers of the Church not necessarily ordained[1] and not necessarily "saints"— Origen
Origen
Adamantius and Tertullian
Tertullian
are often considered Church Fathers, but are not saints, owing to their views later being deemed heretical.[2] Most Church Fathers are honored as saints in the Catholic
Catholic
Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Church of the East, Anglicanism
Anglicanism
and Lutheranism, as well as other churches and groups
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Constantine The Great
Constantine the Great
Constantine the Great
(Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus;[2] Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD[1] – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine, in the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles,[3] was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian and Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD. He was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman Army
Roman Army
officer, and his consort Helena. His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west, in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under Emperors Diocletian
Diocletian
and Galerius
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Christian Apologetics
Christian apologetics
Christian apologetics
(Greek: ἀπολογία, "verbal defence, speech in defence")[1] is a branch of Christian theology
Christian theology
that aims to present historical, reasoned, and evidential bases for Christianity, defending it against objections.[2] Christian apologetics
Christian apologetics
have taken many forms over the centuries, starting with Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
in the early church and Patristic writers such as Origen, Augustine of Hippo, Justin Martyr
Justin Martyr
and Tertullian, then continuing with writers such as Thomas Aquinas
Thomas Aquinas
and Anselm of Canterbury
Anselm of Canterbury
during Scholasticism
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Ecumenical Council
An ecumenical council (or oecumenical council; also general council)[1] is a conference of ecclesiastical dignitaries and theological experts convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice in which those entitled to vote are convoked from the whole world (oikoumene) and which secures the approbation of the whole Church.[2] The word "ecumenical" derives from the Late Latin oecumenicus "general, universal", from Greek oikoumenikos "from the whole world", from he oikoumene ge "the inhabited world (as known to the ancient Greeks); the Greeks and their neighbors considered as developed human society (as opposed to barbarian lands)", in later use "the Roman world" and in the Christian sense in ecclesiastical Greek, from oikoumenos, present passive participle of oikein "inhabit", from oikos "house, habitation."[3] The first seven
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Augustine Of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
(/ɔːˈɡʌstɪn/; 13 November 354 – 28 August 430)[1] was an early Christian theologian
Christian theologian
and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity
Western Christianity
and Western philosophy. He was the bishop of Hippo Regius
Hippo Regius
in north Africa and is viewed as one of the most important Church Fathers
Church Fathers
in Western Christianity
Christianity
for his writings in the Patristic Era. Among his most important works are The City of God, On Christian Doctrine
On Christian Doctrine
and Confessions. According to his contemporary Jerome, Augustine "established anew the ancient Faith".[note 1] In his youth he was drawn to Manichaeism, later to neo-Platonism
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