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Preacher
A preacher is usually a person who delivers sermons or homilies on religious topics to an assembly of people. Less common are preachers who preach on the street, or those whose message is not necessarily religious, but who preach components such as a moral or social worldview or philosophy.Contents1 History 2 Other uses 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Preachers are common throughout most cultures. They can take the form of a Christian
Christian
minister on a Sunday morning, or an Islamic Imam. A Muslim preacher in general is referred to as a dā‘ī, while one giving sermons on a Friday afternoon is called a khatib. The sermon or homily has been an important part of Christian
Christian
services since Early Christianity, and remains prominent in both Roman Catholicism and Protestantism
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Lay Brother
In the past, the term lay brother was used within some Catholic religious institutes to distinguish members who were not ordained from those members who were clerics (priests and seminarians). This term is now considered controversial by some because of the history of inequality between Brothers and clerics. The term "lay" has also been used in the past to designate someone as "uneducated" in contrast to "illiterate". Instead, the term "religious Brother" or simply "Brother" is appropriate when referring to a vowed male religious who is neither priest, deacon, nor seminarian. The vocational title "Brother" is generally capitalized in order to distinguish it from the generic use of the biologically relational term "brother". In religious communities today, religious Brothers are no longer restricted by the institutional inequalities of the past and enjoy the same status, rights, and opportunities as their priest and seminarian confreres, except where sacramental ministry is concerned
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Praça Da Sé
Praça da Sé
Praça da Sé
(English: See Square) is a public space in São Paulo, Brazil. Considered as the city's central point, it is the point from where the distance of all roads passing through São Paulo
São Paulo
are counted. The square was the location of many historic events in São Paulo's history, most notably during the Diretas Já
Diretas Já
movement. The name originates from the episcopal see of the city, the São Paulo Cathedral.Contents1 History1.1 Landscape
Landscape
project 1.2 Renovation2 References 3 Bibliography 4 External linksHistory[edit]Cathedral square in a photo of 1880 by Marc Ferrez. The old Cathedral of São Paulo
São Paulo
is the church to the right.Originally known as Largo da Sé (Field of the See), the square developed around the religious building which preceded the cathedral and surrounding edifices
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Sao Paulo
São Paulo
São Paulo
(/ˌsaʊ ˈpaʊloʊ/; Portuguese pronunciation: [sɐ̃w ˈpawlu] ( listen)) is a municipality in the southeast region of Brazil. The metropolis is an alpha global city (as listed by the GaWC) and the most populous city in Brazil, the Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
and the Southern Hemisphere. The municipality is also the Earth's 13th largest city proper by population. The city is the capital of the surrounding state of São Paulo, one of 26 constituent states of the republic. It is the most populous and wealthiest city in Brazil. It exerts strong international influences in commerce, finance, arts and entertainment.[8] The name of the city honors the Apostle, Saint Paul of Tarsus
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Brasil
Coordinates: 10°S 52°W / 10°S 52°W / -10; -52Federative Republic
Republic
of Brazil República Federativa do Brasil  (Portuguese)FlagCoat of armsMotto: Ordem e Progresso  (Portuguese) (English: "Order and Progress")Anthem: "Hino Nacional Brasileiro" (English: "Brazilian National Anthem")Flag anthem: Hino à Bandeira Nacional[1] (English: "National Flag Anthem")National sealSelo Nacional do Brasil National Seal of BrazilLocation of  Brazil  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital Br
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Quaker
Quakers
Quakers
(or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.[2] Members of the various Quaker movements are all generally united in a belief in the ability of each human being to experientially access "the light within", or "that of God
God
in every person". Some may profess the priesthood of all believers, a doctrine derived from the First Epistle of Peter.[3][4][5][6] They include those with evangelical, holiness, liberal, and traditional Quaker understandings of Christianity. There are also Nontheist Quakers whose spiritual practice is not reliant on the existence of a Christian God
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Saint Peter
Saint
Saint
Peter (Syriac/Aramaic: ܫܸܡܥܘܿܢ ܟܹ݁ܐܦ݂ܵܐ, Shemayon Keppa, Hebrew: שמעון בר יונה‎ Shim'on bar Yona, Greek: Πέτρος Petros, Coptic: ⲡⲉⲧⲣⲟⲥ, translit. Petros, Latin: Petrus; r. AD 30;[1] d. between AD 64 and 68[2]), also known as Simon Peter, Simeon, or Simon ( pronunciation (help·info)), according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
of Jesus
Jesus
Christ, leaders of the early Christian Great Church. Pope
Pope
Gregory I called him repeatedly the "Prince of the Apostles".[3] According to Catholic teaching, Jesus promised Peter in the "Rock of My Church" dialogue in Matthew 16:18 a special position in the Church
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Military Ordinariate
A military ordinariate is an ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Church, of the Latin or an Eastern Church, responsible for the pastoral care of Catholics serving in the armed forces of a nation. Until 1986, they were called "military vicariates" and had a status similar to that of apostolic vicariates, which are headed by a bishop who receives his authority by delegation from the Pope. The apostolic constitution Spirituali militum curae of 21 April 1986 raised their status, declaring that the bishop who heads one of them is an "ordinary", holding authority by virtue of his office, and not by delegation from another person in authority.[1] It likened the military vicariates to dioceses.[2] Each of them is headed by a bishop, who may have the personal rank of archbishop
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Coadjutor Bishop
A coadjutor bishop (or bishop coadjutor) is a bishop in the Catholic, Anglican, and (historically) Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
churches whose main role is to assist the diocesan bishop in the administration of the diocese.[1][2] The coadjutor (literally, "co-assister" in Latin) is a bishop himself, although he is also appointed as vicar general. The coadjutor bishop is, however, given authority beyond that ordinarily given to the vicar general, making him co-head of the diocese in all but ceremonial precedence. In modern times, the coadjutor automatically succeeds the diocesan bishop upon the latter's retirement, removal, or death. Roman Catholic Church[edit] Main article: Bishop (Catholic Church) In the Roman Catholic Church, a coadjutor bishop is an immediate collaborator of the diocesan bishop, similar to an auxiliary bishop.[3][4] However, unlike auxiliary bishops, coadjutors are given the right of succession to the episcopal see
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Auxiliary Bishop
An auxiliary bishop is a bishop assigned to assist the diocesan bishop in meeting the pastoral and administrative needs of the diocese. Auxiliary bishops are titular bishops of sees that no longer exist. In Catholic Church, auxiliary bishops exist in both the Latin Church and in the Eastern Catholic Churches. The particular duties of an auxiliary bishop are given by the diocesan bishop and can vary widely depending on the auxiliary bishop, the ordinary, and the needs of the diocese. In a larger archdiocese, they might be in assigned to serve a portion of the archdiocese (sometimes called deaneries, regions, or vicariates) or to serve a particular population such as immigrants or those of a particular heritage or language
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Territorial Prelate
A territorial prelate is, in Catholic
Catholic
usage, a prelate whose geographic jurisdiction, called territorial prelature, does not belong to any diocese and is considered a particular church. The territorial prelate is sometimes called a prelate nullius, from the Latin nullius diœceseos, prelate "of no diocese," meaning the territory falls directly under the 'exempt' jurisdiction of the Holy See ( Pope
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Territorial Abbey
A territorial abbey (or territorial abbacy) is a particular church of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
comprising defined territory which is not part of a diocese but surrounds an abbey or monastery whose abbot or superior functions as ordinary for all Catholics and parishes in the territory. Such an abbot is called a territorial abbot or abbot nullius diœceseos (abbreviated abbot nullius and Latin for "abbot of no diocese"). A territorial abbot thus differs from an ordinary abbot, who exercises authority only within the monastery's walls or to monks or canons who have taken their vows there
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Consecrator
Consecrator
Consecrator
is a term used in the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
to designate a bishop who ordains a priest to the episcopal state. The term is also used in Eastern Rite Churches and in Anglican
Anglican
communities.Contents1 History 2 Validity 3 Co-Consecrators 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The church has always sought to assemble as many bishops as possible for the election and consecration of new bishops.[1] Although due to difficulties in travel, timing, and frequency of consecrations, this was reduced to the requirement that all comprovincial (of the same province) bishops participate
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Auditor (ecclesiastical)
In ecclesiastical terminology, an Auditor (from a Latin word meaning "hearer") is a person given authority to hear cases in an ecclesiastical court.Contents1 Roman Catholic Church 2 Church of England 3 Church of Scientology 4 ReferencesRoman Catholic Church[edit]Part of a series on theHierarchy of the Catholic ChurchSaint PeterEcclesiastical titles (order of precedence)Pope CardinalCardinal VicarModerator of the curia Chaplain
Chaplain
of His Holiness Papal legate Papal majordomo Apostolic Nuncio Apostolic Delegate Apostolic Syndic Apostolic visitor Vicar Apostolic Apostolic
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Chancellor (ecclesiastical)
Chancellor is an ecclesiastical title used by several quite distinct officials of some Christian churches.In some churches, the Chancellor of a diocese is a lawyer who represents the church in legal matters. In the Church of England, the Chancellor is the judge of the consistory court of the diocese
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Chaplain
A chaplain is a cleric (such as a minister, priest, pastor, rabbi, or imam), or a lay representative of a religious tradition, attached to a secular institution such as a hospital, prison, military unit, school, business, police department, fire department, university, or private chapel. Though originally the word chaplain referred to representatives of the Christian
Christian
faith,[1][2] it is now also applied to people of other religions or philosophical traditions–such as the case of chaplains serving with military forces and an increasing number of chaplaincies at American universities.[3] In recent times, many lay people have received professional training in chaplaincy and a
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