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Pratt Institute
Pratt Institute
Pratt Institute
is a private, nonsectarian, non-profit institution of higher learning located in the Clinton Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, United States, with a satellite campus located at 14th Street in Manhattan
Manhattan
and an extension campus in Utica, New York
Utica, New York
(Pratt MWP).[2] The school originated in 1887 with programs primarily in engineering, architecture, and fine arts.[3] Comprising six schools, the Institute is primarily known for its highly ranked programs in architecture, interior design, and industrial design, and offers both undergraduate and Master's degree programs in a variety of fields, with a strong focus on research.[4] U.S
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Private School
Private schools, also known to many as independent schools, non-governmental, privately funded, or nonstate schools,[1] are not administered by local, state or national governments; parents of kids who attend private schools choose to have their child be in a school where kids are accordingly selected based on either their family income, religious background, or simply based on their academics. Private schools retain the right to select their students and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition, rather than relying on mandatory taxation through public (government) funding; at some private schools students may be able to get a scholarship, lowering this tuition fee, dependent on a student's talents or abilities (e.g. sport scholarship, art scholarship, academic scholarship), need for financial aid, or tax credit scholarships that might be available
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Standard Oil
Standard Oil
Standard Oil
Co. Inc. was an American oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. Established in 1870 by John D. Rockefeller and Henry Flagler
Henry Flagler
as a corporation in Ohio, it was the largest oil refinery in the world of its time.[7] Its controversial history as one of the world's first and largest multinational corporations ended in 1911, when the United States
United States
Supreme Court ruled that Standard Oil
Standard Oil
was an illegal monopoly. Standard Oil
Standard Oil
dominated the oil products market initially through horizontal integration in the refining sector, then, in later years vertical integration; the company was an innovator in the development of the business trust
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Master's Degree
A master's degree[fn 1] (from Latin
Latin
magister) is usually a second-cycle academic degree awarded by universities or colleges upon completion of a course of study demonstrating mastery or a high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice.[1] A master's degree normally requires previous study at the bachelor's level, either as a separate degree or as part of an integrated course
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Princeton Review
The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review
is a college admission services company offering test preparation services, tutoring and admissions resources, online courses, and books published by Random House. The company has more than 4,000 teachers and tutors in the United States and Canada and international franchises in 14 other countries. The company is headquartered in Natick, Massachusetts, and is privately held. It is not associated with Princeton University.[1]Contents1 Corporate history 2 Test preparation 3 Criticisms3.1 General 3.2 Ranking schools 3.3 Privacy concerns4 References 5 External linksCorporate history[edit] The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review
was founded in 1981 by John Katzman, who—shortly after leaving college—taught SAT
SAT
preparation to 15 students in New York City.[2] He served as CEO until 2007, and was replaced by Michael Perik
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Industrialist
A business magnate (formally industrialist) refers to an entrepreneur of great influence, importance, or standing in a particular enterprise or field of business. The term characteristically refers to a wealthy entrepreneur or investor who controls, through personal business ownership or dominant shareholding position, a firm or industry whose goods or services are widely consumed
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Oil Industry
The petroleum industry, also known as the oil industry or the oil patch, includes the global processes of exploration, extraction, refining, transporting (often by oil tankers and pipelines), and marketing of petroleum products. The largest volume products of the industry are fuel oil and gasoline (petrol). Petroleum
Petroleum
(oil) is also the raw material for many chemical products, including pharmaceuticals, solvents, fertilizers, pesticides, synthetic fragrances, and plastics. The industry is usually divided into three major components: upstream, midstream and downstream. Midstream operations are often included in the downstream category. Petroleum
Petroleum
is vital to many industries, and is of importance to the maintenance of industrial civilization in its current configuration, and thus is a critical concern for many nations
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Greenpoint, Brooklyn
Greenpoint is the northernmost neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York
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Whale Oil
Whale
Whale
oil is oil obtained from the blubber of whales. Whale
Whale
oil was sometimes known as train oil, which comes from the Dutch word traan ("tear" or "drop"). Sperm oil, a special kind of oil obtained from the head cavities of sperm whales, differs chemically from ordinary whale oil: it is composed mostly of liquid wax. Its properties and applications differ from those of regular whale oil, and is sold at a higher price when marketed. Early industrial societies used whale oil widely in oil lamps and to make soap and margarine
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John D. Rockefeller
Founding the University of Chicago, Rockefeller University, Central Philippine University, General Education Board and Rockefeller FoundationNet worth US$400 billion (in 2017 dollars; inflation-adjusted) in 1913,[a] according to Forbes[1][2] (1.5% to 2% of the United States
United States
economy; or approximately 1/65th to 1/50th of its GDP)[b]Political party RepublicanSpouse(s) Laura Celestia Spelman (m. 1864–1915; her death)Children Elizabeth, Alice, Alta, Edith, and John Jr.Parent(s)William Avery Rockefeller Eliza DavisonRelatives Rockefeller familyJohn Davison Rockefeller Sr. (July 8, 1839 – May 23, 1937) was an American oil industry business magnate, industrialist, and philanthropist. He is widely considered the wealthiest American of all time,[4][5] and the richest person in modern history.[6][7] Rockefeller was born into a large family in upstate New York and was shaped by his con man father and religious mother
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14th Street (Manhattan)
14th Street is a major crosstown street in the New York City
New York City
borough of Manhattan. Presently primarily a shopping street, in the earlier history of New York City
New York City
14th Street was an upscale location, but it lost its glamor and status as the city grew northward. At Broadway, 14th Street forms the southern border of Union Square. It is also considered the northern boundary of Greenwich Village, Alphabet City, and the East Village, and the southern boundary of Chelsea, Flatiron/Lower Midtown, and Gramercy. 14th Street marks the southern terminus of Manhattan's grid system. North of 14th Street, the streets make up a near-perfect grid that runs in numerical order
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New York State Legislature
Majority caucus (104)     Democratic (103)      Independence (1)Minority caucus (37)     Republican (37)Vacant (9)     Vacant (9)Political groupsMajority caucus (32)     Republican (31)      Democrat Caucusing with Republicans (1)Minority caucus (29)     Democratic (29)Vacant (2)     Vacant (2)Salary $79,000ElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Meeting placeNew York State Capitol, AlbanyWebsitepublic.leginfo.state.ny.us www.assembly.state.ny.usNew York State Legislature
Legislature
are the two houses that act as the state legislature of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York
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Scientific American
Scientific American
Scientific American
(informally abbreviated SciAm) is an American popular science magazine. Many famous scientists, including Albert Einstein, have contributed articles in the past 170 years. It is the oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States (though it only became monthly in 1921).Contents1 History 2 International editions 3 First issue 4 Editors 5 Special
Special
issues 6 Scientific American
Scientific American
50 award 7 Website 8 Columns 9 Television 10 Books 11 Scientific and political debate 12 Awards 13 Top 10 Science Stories of the Year 14 Controversy 15 See also 16 References 17 External linksHistory[edit] Scientific American
Scientific American
was founded by inventor and publisher Rufus M. Porter in 1845[2] as a four-page weekly newspaper. Throughout its early years, much emphasis was placed on reports of what was going on at the U.S
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Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
(/kɑːrˈneɪɡi/ kar-NAY-gee, but commonly /ˈkɑːrnəɡi/ KAR-nə-ghee or /kɑːrˈnɛɡi/ kar-NEG-ee;[3] November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist. Carnegie led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century and is often identified as one of the richest people (and richest Americans).[4] He became a leading philanthropist in the United States and in the British Empire. During the last 18 years of his life, he gave away about $350 million[5][note 1] to charities, foundations, and universities—almost 90 percent of his fortune. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy. Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1848
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Renaissance Revival Architecture
Renaissance
Renaissance
Revival (sometimes referred to as "Neo-Renaissance") is an all-encompassing designation that covers many 19th century architectural revival styles which were neither Grecian (see Greek Revival) nor Gothic (see Gothic Revival) but which instead drew inspiration from a wide range of classicizing Italian modes. Under the broad designation " Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture" nineteenth-century architects and critics went beyond the architectural style which began in Florence
Florence
and central Italy in the early 15th century as an expression of Humanism; they also included styles we would identify as Mannerist or Baroque
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