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Prathia Hall
Prathia Hall (January 1, 1940 – August 12, 2002) was a leader and activist in the Civil Rights Movement, a womanist theologian, and ethicist. She was the key inspiration for Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech.Contents1 Early life 2 Civil rights involvement 3 "I Have A Dream" 4 Selma, Alabama 5 Later life 6 Quotations about Hall 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External LinksEarly life[edit] Hall was raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the daughter of founders of Mount Sharon Baptist
Baptist
Church, an inner-city church in an under-served area of Philadelphia.[1] Her father was a Baptist preacher and a passionate advocate for racial justice,[2] who regarded her as his successor. He inspired her to pursue religion and social justice.[1][3] Prathia believed she was brought into the world for a reason – to integrate religion and freedom together.[4] Her leadership potential was recognized early
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Visiting Scholar
In US academia, a visiting scholar, visiting researcher, visiting fellow, visiting lecturer or visiting professor is a scholar from an institution who visits a host university and is projected to teach, lecture, or perform research on a topic the visitor is valued for.[1] In many cases the position is not salaried because the scholar typically is salaried by their home institution (or partially salaried, as in some cases of sabbatical leave from US universities), while some visiting positions are salaried. Typically, a position as visiting scholar is for a couple of months or even a year,[2][3] though it can be extended
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Princeton Theological Seminary
Princeton Theological Seminary (PTS) is a private, nonprofit, and independent graduate school of theology in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1812 under the auspices of Archibald Alexander, the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, and the College
College
of New Jersey (now Princeton University), it is the second-oldest seminary in the United States.[1][2] It is also the largest of ten seminaries associated with the Presbyterian Church (USA). Princeton Seminary has long been influential in theological studies, with many leading biblical scholars, theologians, and clergy among its faculty and alumni. In addition, it operates one of the largest theological libraries in the world and maintains a number of special collections, including the Karl Barth
Karl Barth
Research Collection in the Center for Barth Studies
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Dayton, Ohio
Dayton (/ˈdeɪtən/) is the sixth-largest city in the state of Ohio and the county seat of Montgomery County.[5] A small part of the city extends into Greene County.[6] In the 2010 census, the population was 141,759, and the Dayton metropolitan area
Dayton metropolitan area
had 799,232 residents, making it Ohio's fourth-largest metropolitan area, after Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Columbus, and the 63rd-largest in the United States.[7] The Dayton-Springfield-Greenville Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,080,044 in 2010, making it the 43rd-largest in the United States.[8] Dayton is within Ohio's
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Womanist Theology
Womanist theology is a religious conceptual framework which reconsiders and revises the traditions, practices, scriptures, and biblical interpretation with a special lens to empower and liberate African-American
African-American
women in America. Womanist theology associates with and departs from Feminist theology and Black theology
Black theology
specifically because it integrates the perspectives and experiences of African-American
African-American
and other women of color. The former's lack of attention to the everyday realities of women of color and the latter's lack of understanding of the full dimension of liberation from the unique oppressions of Black women require bringing them together in Womanist Theology
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Master Of Divinity
In the academic study of theology, the Master of Divinity (MDiv, magister divinitatis in Latin) is the first professional degree of the pastoral profession in North America. It is the most common academic degree in seminaries and divinity schools (e.g. in 2014 nearly 44% of all US students in schools accredited by the Association of Theological Schools were enrolled in an MDiv program).[1][2] In many Christian denominations and in some other religions the degree is the standard prerequisite for ordination to the priesthood or pastorship or other appointment, ordination or licensing to professional ministry
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Ku Klux Klan
The Ku Klux Klan
Ku Klux Klan
(/ˈkuː ˈklʌks ˈklæn, ˈkjuː/),[a] commonly called the KKK or simply the Klan, refers to three distinct secret movements at different point in time in the history of the United States. Each has advocated extremist reactionary positions such as white supremacy, white nationalism, anti-immigration and—especially in later iterations—Nordicism,[7][8] anti-Catholicism Historically, the KKK used terrorism—both physical assault and murder—against groups or individuals whom they opposed.[9] All three movements have called for the "purification" of American society and all are considered right-wing extremist organizations.[10][11][12][13] The first Klan flourished in the Southern United States
Southern United States
in the late 1860s, then died out by the early 1870s
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Interdenominational Theological Center
The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) is a consortium of five predominantly African-American denominational Christian seminaries located in Atlanta, Georgia, operating together as a professional graduate school of theology. It is the largest free-standing African American theological school in the United States and has been described as "one of the more successful ventures in black ecumenism" and "a major center of progressive, African American theological thought." Its constituent seminaries are the Morehouse School of Religion (associated with a number of Baptist groups, including American Baptist Churches USA, National Baptist Convention, USA, and Progressive National Baptist Convention); Gammon Theological Seminary (United Methodist Church); Turner Theological Seminary (African Methodist Episcopal Church); Phillips School of Theology (Christian Methodist Episcopal Church); and Charles H. Mason Theological Seminary (Church of God in Christ)
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Master Of Theology
In North America, the Master of Theology
Master of Theology
(Latin: Theologiae Magister, abbreviated ThM) is a post graduate or doctoral degree considered by the Association of Theological Schools
Association of Theological Schools
to be the minimum educational credential for teaching theological subjects in accredited seminaries and graduate schools. The ThM is equivalent to the Master of Sacred Theology and the Association of Theological Schools
Association of Theological Schools
classifies both degrees as "Advanced Programs Oriented Toward Theological Research and Teaching."[1] North America[edit] A Master of Theology
Master of Theology
(ThM) is an advanced theological research degree offered by universities, divinity schools, and seminaries.[2] The degree is usually earned after the Master of Divinity (MDiv) or an equivalent of three years of graduate studies in theology
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Sasser, Georgia
Sasser is a town in Terrell County, Georgia, United States. The population was 393 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Albany, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area. Geography[edit] Sasser is located at 31°43′12″N 84°20′52″W / 31.72000°N 84.34778°W / 31.72000; -84.34778 (31.720119, -84.347676).[4] According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.8 square miles (2.1 km2), all land. Demographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±1900 322—1910 44137.0%1920 402−8.8%1930 4122.5%1940 365−11.4%1950 3711.6%1960 3823.0%1970 339−11.3%1980 40720.1%1990 335−17.7%2000 39317.3%2010 279−29.0%Est. 2016 260 [1] −6.8%U.S. Decennial Census[5]As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 393 people, 152 households, and 112 families residing in the town. The population density was 500.9 people per square mile (194.5/km²)
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Ph.D.
A Doctor of Philosophy
Philosophy
(PhD, Ph.D., DPhil, or Dr. phil.; Latin Philosophiae doctor) is the highest academic degree awarded by universities in most countries. PhDs are awarded for programs across the whole breadth of academic fields. The completion of a PhD is often a requirement for employment as a university professor, researcher, or scientist in many fields. Individuals who have earned a Doctor of Philosophy
Philosophy
degree may, in most jurisdictions, use the title Doctor (often abbreviated "Dr") or, in non-English speaking countries, variants such as "Dr. phil." with their name, and may use post-nominal letters such as "Ph.D.", "PhD" (depending on the awarding institute). The requirements to earn a PhD degree vary considerably according to the country, institution, and time period, from entry-level research degrees to higher doctorates
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Southwest Georgia
Southwest Georgia
Southwest Georgia
is a fourteen-county region in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Georgia. It has a 2010 census population of 496,433, and is the least populated region in Georgia, just slightly behind Southeast Georgia. Additionally, the area has historically been the poorest region of the state since at least 1995, when over 25% of the residents were in poverty. It is commonly referred to as SOWEGA, pronounced "Sow WEE guh". Southwest Georgia
Southwest Georgia
is anchored by Albany, the most populous city and region's sole metropolitan area.Contents1 Major cities 2 Metropolitan Areas 3 Micropolitan Statistical Areas 4 Counties 5 ReferencesMajor cities[edit]Albany- Pop. 77,434 Thomasville- Pop. 19,398 Moultrie- Pop. 15,405 Bainbridge- Pop. 15,697Metropolitan Areas[edit]Albany Metropolitan Area- Pop. 157,688Micropolitan Statistical Areas[edit]Moultrie Micropolitan Statistical Area- Pop
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American Baptist Association
The American Baptist
Baptist
Association (ABA), formed by a merger of two related groups in 1924, is an association of Baptist
Baptist
churches.[1] The principal founder was Ben M. Bogard, a pastor of Antioch Missionary Baptist
Baptist
Church in Little Rock, Arkansas. ABA headquarters, including its bookstore and publishing house, Bogard Press, is based in Texarkana, Texas.[2]Part of a series onBaptistsBackgroundChristianity Protestantism Puritanism AnabaptismDoctrinePriesthood of all believers Individual soul liberty Separation of church and state Sola scriptura Congregationalism Ordinances Offices ConfessionsKey figuresJohn Smyth Thomas Helwys Roger Williams John Clarke John Bunyan Shubal Stearns Andrew Fuller Charles Spurgeon D. N
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Ebony (magazine)
Ebony Media Operations, LLC (2016-present) Johnson Publishing (1945-2016)Total circulation (2017) 1,333,421 [1]Founder John H. JohnsonFirst issue November 1, 1945; 72 years ago (1945-11-01)[2]Country United StatesBased in Chicago, IllinoisLanguage EnglishWebsite www.ebony.comISSN 0012-9011Ebony is a monthly magazine for the African-American
African-American
market. It was founded by John H. Johnson
John H. Johnson
in Chicago and has published continuously since the autumn of 1945. A digest-sized sister magazine, Jet, was founded by the Johnson Publishing Company.[3] After 71 years, in 2016, Johnson sold the publications to private equity firm Clear View Group. The new publisher will be known as Ebony Media Corporation.[4][5]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Ebony was founded by John H. Johnson
John H

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Annapolis, Maryland
Annapolis (/əˈnæpəlɪs/) is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, as well as the county seat of Anne Arundel
Anne Arundel
County. Situated on the Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
at the mouth of the Severn River, 25 miles (40 km) south of Baltimore
Baltimore
and about 30 miles (50 km) east of Washington, D.C., Annapolis is part of the Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area. Its population was measured at 38,394 by the 2010 census. The city served as the seat of the Confederation Congress
Confederation Congress
(former Second Continental Congress) and temporary national capital of the United States
United States
in 1783–1784. At that time, General George Washington came before the body convened in the new Maryland
Maryland
State House and resigned his commission as commander of the Continental Army
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Temple University
Temple University
Temple University
(Temple or TU) is a public research university located in the Cecil B. Moore neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. It was founded in 1884 by Baptist Minister Russell Conwell. In 1882, Conwell came to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
to lead the Grace Baptist Church while he began tutoring working class citizens late at night to accommodate their work schedules. These students, later dubbed "night owls", were taught in the basement of Conwell's Baptist Temple, hence the origin of the university's name and mascot
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