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Prada
Prada
Prada
S.p.A
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Givenchy
Givenchy
Givenchy
(French pronunciation: ​[ʒivɑ̃ʃi]) is a French luxury fashion and perfume house. It hosts the brand of haute couture clothing, accessories and Parfums Givenchy, perfumes and cosmetics. The house of Givenchy
Givenchy
was founded in 1952 by designer Hubert de Givenchy
Givenchy
and is a member of Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture et du Pret-a-Porter. It is owned by luxury conglomerate LVMH
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Fashion House
Fashion
Fashion
design is the art of applying design, aesthetics and natural beauty to clothing and its accessories. It is influenced by cultural and social attitudes, and has varied over time and place. Fashion designers work in a number of ways in designing clothing and accessories such as bracelets and necklaces. Because of the time required to bring a garment onto the market, designers must at times anticipate changes to consumer tastes. Designers conduct research on fashion trends and interpret them for their audience. Their specific designs are used by manufacturers
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Wine
Wine
Wine
(from Latin
Latin
vinum) is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes, generally Vitis
Vitis
vinifera, fermented without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients.[1] Yeast consumes the sugar in the grapes and converts it to ethanol and carbon dioxide. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different styles of wine. These variations result from the complex interactions between the biochemical development of the grape, the reactions involved in fermentation, the terroir, and the production process. Many countries enact legal appellations intended to define styles and qualities of wine. These typically restrict the geographical origin and permitted varieties of grapes, as well as other aspects of wine production
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Boutique
A boutique is "a small store that sells stylish clothing, jewelry, or other usually luxury goods".[1] The word is French for "shop", which derives ultimately from the Greek ἀποθήκη (apothēkē) or "storehouse".[2][3] The term "boutique," and also "designer" refer (with some differences) to both goods and services which are containing some element that is claimed to justify an extremely high price, itself called boutique pricing. As with the fine art market, and the use of art in money laundering schemes, national governments have to be concerned with boutique shops and the high pricing of boutique goods as instruments in fraud and other financial schemes.Contents1 Etymology and usage 2 Lifestyle 3 See also 4 NotesEtymology and usage[edit] The term "boutique" entered into everyday English since the late 1960s
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US$
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Pravda
Pravda
Pravda
(Russian: Правда, IPA: [ˈpravdə] ( listen), "Truth") is a Russian broadsheet newspaper, formerly the official newspaper of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, when it was one of the most influential papers in the country with a circulation of 11 million.[1] The newspaper began publication on 5 May 1912 in the Russian Empire, but was already extant abroad in January 1911.[2] It emerged as a leading newspaper of the Soviet Union
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Luxury Goods
In economics, a luxury good (or upmarket good) is a good for which demand increases more than proportionally as income rises, and is a contrast to a "necessity good", for which demand increases proportionally less than income.[1] Luxury goods
Luxury goods
are often synonymous with superior goods and Veblen goods. The word "luxury" is originated from the Latin word “Luxus,” which means indulgence of the senses, regardless of cost.[2]Contents1 Market characteristics 2 Market trends 3 Market size 4 Art history 5 Scope of the term 6 Socioeconomic significance 7 Luxury brands 8 Luxury department stores 9 Luxury shopping districts 10 See also 11 References 12 Further readingMarket characteristics[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Ready-to-wear
Ready-to-wear
Ready-to-wear
or prêt-à-porter (/ˌprɛt ɑː pɔːrˈteɪ/, French pronunciation: ​[pʁɛ.ta pɔʁ.te]; often abbreviated RTW; "off-the-rack" or "off-the-peg" in casual use) is the term for factory-made clothing, sold in finished condition in standardized sizes, as distinct from made to measure or bespoke clothing tailored to a particular person's frame. Off-the-peg is sometimes used for items other than clothing such as handbags. Ready-to-wear
Ready-to-wear
has rather different connotations in the spheres of fashion and classic clothing. In the fashion industry, designers produce ready-to-wear clothing, intended to be worn without significant alteration because clothing made to standard sizes fits most people. They use standard patterns, factory equipment, and faster construction techniques to keep costs low, compared to a custom-sewn version of the same item
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Cell Phone
A mobile phone, known as a cell phone in North America, is a portable telephone that can make and receive calls over a radio frequency link while the user is moving within a telephone service area. The radio frequency link establishes a connection to the switching systems of a mobile phone operator, which provides access to the public switched telephone network (PSTN). Modern mobile telephone services use a cellular network architecture, and, therefore, mobile telephones are called cellular telephones or cell phones, in North America. In addition to telephony, 2000s-era mobile phones support a variety of other services, such as text messaging, MMS, email, Internet
Internet
access, short-range wireless communications (infrared, Bluetooth), business applications, video games, and digital photography
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Madrid
Madrid
Madrid
(/məˈdrɪd/, Spanish: [maˈðɾið], locally [maˈðɾi(θ)]) is the capital of Spain
Spain
and the largest municipality in both the Community of Madrid
Community of Madrid
and Spain
Spain
as a whole. The city has almost 3.166 million[4] inhabitants with a metropolitan area population of approximately 6.5 million
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Ginia Bellafante
Ginia Bellafante (born March 31, 1965) is an American writer and critic for The New York Times.[1] She first worked as a fashion critic then spending the next five years reviewing television.[2] In 2011, she began writing for the Big City column.[2] She has written for Time magazine.[3][4]Contents1 Criticism 2 Personal 3 References 4 External linksCriticism[edit] Some of Bellafante's writing has been criticized for its treatment of gender issues
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High Fashion
Haute couture (/ˌoʊt kuːˈtjʊər/; French pronunciation: ​[ot kuˈtyʁ]; French for "high sewing" or "high dressmaking" or "high fashion") is the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is high-end fashion that is constructed by hand from start to finish, made from high-quality, expensive, often unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable sewers, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques.[1] Couture translates literally from French as "dressmaking" but may also refer to fashion, sewing, or needlework[2] and is also used as a common abbreviation of haute couture and refers to the same thing in spirit.[3] Haute translates literally to "high". A haute couture garment is often made for a client, tailored specifically for the wearer's measurements and body stance
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Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°47′25″N 73°57′35″W / 40.79028°N 73.95972°W / 40.79028; -73.95972Manhattan New York CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateView from Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower ManhattanFlagEtymology: Lenape: Manna-hata (island of many hills)Nickname(s): The City[1]Location of Manhattan, shown in red, in New York CityCoordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W / 40.72833; -73.99417Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New York (Coterminous)City  New YorkSettled 1624Government • Type Borough (New York City) • Borough President Gale Brewer
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Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal, along with its Asian and European editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to News Corp, in their June 2017 10-K Filing with the SEC, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.277 million copies (including nearly 1,270,000 digital subscriptions) as of June 2017[update],[2] compared with USA Today's 1.7 million. The newspaper has won 40 Pulitzer Prizes through 2017[3] and derives its name from Wall Street
Wall Street
in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan
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